Midsouth’s Black Friday Giveaway!

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Midsouth Shooters Lock-N-Load Giveaway

If you’ve been a customer of Midsouth Shooters Supply for long, you know we love our Black Friday Giveaways. One of our favorites in the past has been the Lock-N-Load Giveaway we did a few years ago. Thanks to the fantastic folks at Hornady, we’re able to bring you the Return of the Lock-N-Load Giveaway! Click Here to get started!

As the crowning jewel of our Black Friday through Cyber Monday sales extravaganza, the Lock-N-Load Giveaway gives our customers the chance to win one of three Hornady Press Kits.

What You Could Win:

One lucky winner will receive the Lock-N-Load Classic Kit Deluxe, with almost everything a reloader would need on their bench to start cranking out their own ammunition, at a fraction of the cost.

the lock-n-load classic press kit deluxe
Comes with Classic Single Stage Press, Powder Measure with Stand, and everything else shown here!

Next is the Lock-N-Load AP Progressive Press. This kit is great for the bulk ammo producer. With every pull of the press handle, you have the ability to churn out hundreds of rounds of ammo, great for bulk pistol shooters, competition shooters, and AR enthusiasts.

the lock-n-load ap progressive press
The Lock-N-Load AP Progressive Press

Lastly, one winner will get their hands on the newest offering from Hornady, the Lock-N-Load Iron Press Kit. This beefy press offers the heaviest in class weight, great for building big ammo for max distance and knock-down.

the new lock-n-load iron press kit
The New Lock-N-Load Iron Press Kit, with Auto Prime

The deals are still going on, so head over to Midsouth for some great sales, and a chance to win a brand new press. There are tons of ways to enter, so don’t worry about not being on social media. We’re thankful we get to serve our customers, and we wish all of them luck in the giveaway!

IMR Powders: A Growing Family

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IMR Legendary Powders recently released their new family of smokeless reloading powders! To the well trained eye of a seasoned reloader, or one who reloads with a lot of Alliant Powders, one could ascertain the namesakes of these IMR powders. Having another source for some of the best powders on the market is factor every reloader can get behind!

Press Release Date 11-12-16

IMR® Legendary Powders Releases New IMR Family of Powders

IMR Legendary Powders is excited to announce a new family of shotshell and pistol propellants.

We believe it takes a Legendary Powder brand like IMR to improve this series of legendary powders. This series of five popular burn-rate powders covers an extremely wide range of shotshell and pistol cartridges, utilizing new, green technology. Each powder was designed to match current shotshell bushing charts, so the handloader will already have the appropriate bushings available for each load.  This new technology burns clean, providing accurate metering and top performance characteristics.  All of these powders are REACH compliant, meaning these propellants are not harmful to the environment.

IMR Family of Powders grows

IMR Target™ The first powder in this new family is a fast-burning pistol powder.  This fine-grained, small-flake pistol powder meters superbly, providing very precise loads in even the smallest pistol cartridges like the .25 ACP!

IMR Red™ The second powder in this new family was designed to be an efficient, clean-burning, 12-gauge target powder. IMR Red also performs nicely in various lead pistol target loads, such as match competition loads and Cowboy reduced loads.

IMR Green™ The third in this new family is slightly slower-burning than IMR Red, making it an ideal Trap Handicap powder and soon a favorite with Sporting Clays enthusiasts.

IMR Unequal™ IMR Unequal combines small-sized flakes for uniform metering in all pistol applications and its burn speed accommodates a wide range of shotshell and pistol cartridges.

IMR Blue™ The slowest burn speed of the five new propellants, IMR BLUE, has excellent application for heavy 12-gauge 2-¾-inch, 3-inch and 3-1/2-inch field loads.

These new powders will be available in January 2017 at quality reloading powder dealers everywhere. IMR Target and IMR Blue will be available in one-pound (1lb), four-pound (4lb) and eight-pound (8lb) containers and IMR Red, IMR Green and IMR Unequal in 14-ounce (14 oz), four-pound (4lb) and eight-pound (8lb) containers.

Complete load data for these versatile and useful propellants is accessible on the Hodgdon Reloading Data Center at www.HodgdonReloading.com.

Also from Hodgdon, comes the CFEBLK powder, optimized for use in reloading 300 Blackout Sub-Sonic Loads

Press Release Date 11-3-16

Hodgdon® releases CFE BLK

Hodgdon, The Brand That’s True®, is excited to announce the release of CFE BLK™, a new Spherical powder specifically formulated for the .300 AAC Blackout cartridge. CFE BLK joins the Hodgdon CFE™ family of CFE 223™ and CFE Pistol™.

This new powder provides full function of AR-type rifles throughout the range of bullet weights, and is perfect for those subsonic

Copper Fouling Eliminator, Ball Powder for Great Metering
Copper Fouling Eliminator, Ball Powder for Great Metering

reduced loads.  In addition to being the perfect solution for the .300 Blackout, it performs beautifully in many smaller capacity cartridges, in particular, varmint cartridges such as the .17 Hornet, .17 Ackley Hornet, .218 Bee, .221 Fireball and many more.  It also yields top performance in the 6.8 Remington SPC and the 7.62X39 MM Russian cartridge.  This fine powder meters like a dream and leaves no copper residue, extending accuracy for longer shooting periods, and making clean-up quick and easy.  It is truly a remarkable new propellant!

This new powder will be available in January 2017 in one-pound (1lb) and eight-pound (8lb) containers at quality reloading powder dealers.

Complete load data for this versatile and useful propellant will be accessible December 2016 on the Hodgdon Reloading Data Center at www.HodgdonReloading.com.

Review: Springfield Armory Range Officer Operator

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If you’re looking for higher-end features in a quality 1911, and you’re on a lower-end budget, look no further than the Range Officer: it’s ready to go!


by Bob Campbell


Springfield Armory Range Officer Operator
Springfield Armory Range Officer Operator

The original Springfield Armory (the very first armory established under authority of General George Washington) started making guns in 1777. Closed by the federal government in 1968, and then privately reopened with a brand new start in 1974 in Geneseo, Illinois, the resurrected Springfield Armory also resurrected its military roots, producing the semi-auto M1A rifles (the first civilian production of the M-14) and soon thereafter the venerable 1911 John-Browning-designed handgun — the “Government Model.”

The 1911 has been produced now by a plethora of different manufacturers, and, holding true to the original design, they all share most things in common. A 1911 is a single-action, magazine-fed autoloader with a sear-blocking safety as well as a grip-actuated safety on the frame backstrap. A well-made 1911 is a hard-hitting, durable, and reliable pistol design (especially hard-hitting in its original .45 ACP chambering). The original 1911 pistol endured a series of rigorous testing trials before being adopted by the U.S. including being dropped in sand, corroded in acid, fired until too hot to handle, and firing through 6,000 rounds without a single malfunction. It was the only design submitted that passed all these tests. (It later passed a 20,000 round endurance test to meet FBI-mandated contract requirements, a contract which was won by Springfield Armory.)

The 1911 safety and firing mechanism is different from most available handguns: its safety can only be applied when the pistol’s hammer is set fully to the rear, ready to fire. Carrying a 1911 in this mode, known as “cocked-and-locked,” makes it very fast getting to the first shot. The single-action trigger helps here too. Unlike the double-action-first-shot, double-action-only, or those using a “trigger-actuated” safety system, all a single-action trigger does is move the sear to drop the hammer. This is an advantage in accuracy and control on the first shot, and for subsequent rounds. The grip safety locks the trigger until the safety is depressed by the shooter’s hand grip.

Springfield Armory offers a wide variety of 1911-style handguns, ranging across frame and slide sizes, weights, calibers, and “levels” of build attention. There is also a wide price range that goes along across that board. The main differences among their various 1911 models are in the attention to details: the component quality, and the level of fitting and tuning, and the finish. At the base level, you can still get an “original” GI-spec .45, and at the upper-end, Springfield Armory can box up a championship-level competition piece ready for you to take to the USPSA Nationals, and win it.

Springfield Range Officer Operator grip
Checkered grips, checkered mainspring housing, a speed thumb safety, and a good beavertail grip safety are desirable features for a 1911. The 1911 is one of the fastest handguns out there coming from the holster to an accurate first shot on a target.

Springfield Armory has used “Range Officer” as a designation for its “value line.” The primary difference between these guns and the higher-end pistols is the finish. The Range Officer line has a parkerized finish (stainless steel is also available). These pistols also have a one-sided thumb safety rather than the more expensive ambidextrous unit. However, the Range Officer lineup still features a match-grade stainless steel barrel and tightly-fitted barrel bushing, two primary keys to good accuracy potential from a 1911.

The Range Officer version tested (the “Operator”) features a light-mounting rail. This rail is compatible with the wide range of available combat lights and lasers. The Operator also has forward cocking serrations on the slide. Its sights are from Novak — a white dot rear and fiber optic front. The contrast is good, and the fiber optic sight provides rapid acquisition. The pistol also features a scalloped ejection port, lightweight hammer, target-style trigger, and a grip-enhancing beavertail grip safety. Trigger compression is factory-set at a clean 6.5 pounds.

Range Testing
Working from an Eclipse Holster, speed was excellent. This holster keeps the pistol secure on the belt and offers a good blend of speed and retention. I loaded the supplied Springfield magazines and backed them up with a good supply of other 7- and 8-round magazines. The pistol was lubricated prior to testing. The magazines were loaded with Federal American Eagle 230-grain FMJ ammunition.

Springfield Range Officer Operator firing
The author found the Springfield Range Officer Operator a reliable and accurate service pistol. A steel-frame .45 is heavy to carry but the extra weight provides excellent control.

Firing “double-taps” quickly at 5, 7, and 10 yards, the pistol produced excellent results. This is a handgun that responds well for a trained shooter. Moving between targets quickly, and getting the fiber optic sight on the target, gave a solid hit when the trigger was properly compressed. The results simply cannot be faulted. While I often deploy lighter, aluminum-frame handguns because they’re lighter in the holster, the extra weight of its steel frame makes the Range Officer easily controllable.

Accuracy
I also tested with several defense and service loads. Recoil was greater with +P loads and a decision must be made if these loads are worth the extra effort to master. The wound potential of the .45 ACP is proven. I do not let those with a one-safari resume influence my view. I don’t think anyone can argue against the defensive capability of a .45 ACP.

Springfield Range Officer Operator tsrget
The author found the Springfield .45 exhibited excellent practical accuracy. The Operator is factory-sighted for 25 yards and may fire a little low at 7 yards, but this is easily compensated for.

Among the top loads available for the .45 ACP is the Federal 230-grain Hydra-Shok. An intelligently-designed bullet with a proven history, the Hydra-Shok offers excellent wound potential. The American Eagle practice load fires to the same point of impact, making the two a good combination. Firing for accuracy from a solid bench-rest position at 25 yards, the single best group was a 2.0-inch effort for 5 shots with the Speer 230-grain Gold Dot.

Springfield Armory has taken a great handgun design and not only made it better, but, with the Range Officer, Springfield Armory made it affordable. Compared to even minimum custom-done modifications to a standard-style 1911, the package wrapped around the Range Officer is a great value.

Springfield Range Officer Operator accuracy


Bob Campbell is an established and well-respected outdoors writer, contributing regularly to many publications ranging from SWAT Magazine to Knifeworld. Bob has also authored three books: Holsters For Combat and Concealed Carry (Paladin Press), The 1911 Semi Auto (Stoeger Publishing), and The Handgun In Personal Defense (The Second Amendment Foundation).

Gun shops anticipate a busy Black Friday despite Hillary Clinton loss

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Despite many gun owners stocking up prior to the 2016 Presidential Election, firearms retailers still expect a good holiday sales season.


Source: Reuters


msss_holiday_sales

Like most other retailers, gun sellers thrive during the holidays. Last year’s Black Friday featured record activity for a single day, according to Federal background check data. This year, Christmas actually came early for U.S. gun shop owners. Spurred on by fears of a Hillary Clinton victory and the accompanying threat of restrictive gun legislation, U.S gun shop owners had staggering sales in the months prior to the election, but these same retailers may now be hard-pressed to match last year’s record holiday sales (December 2015 was the second busiest month ever, next to December 2012 in the face of an Obama-driven push for more restrictions). Analysts believe that this year’s holiday sales may appear to be floundering due to gun owners having stocked up in anticipation of a possible Clinton presidency. Overall, though, there’s no cause for alarm.

Federal background check data showed that gun retailers had a record October this year, the month preceding the November Presidential Election. As reported last issue, gun store traffic has fallen off substantially since Donald Trump won the presidency. The following day, November 8, shares of Smith & Wesson Holding Corp dropped 15% (but with a rebound this past week), while Sturm Ruger & Company’s stock is 17% lower.

Now, with this year’s Black Friday upon us, gun dealers say traffic is regaining momentum after the post-election drop.

“I’m not expecting it to be any slower than our normal Black Friday,” said Kellie Weeks, owner of Georgia Gun Store in Gainesville: “But if Hillary had won, we would have sold out already…”

History repeats… After Democratic candidate Barack Obama was elected in 2008, November background checks jumped 48% compared to the prior November, according to data from the National Shooting Sports Foundation. By comparison, background checks rose a more modest 5% in November 2004 after Republican George W. Bush was re-elected.

The Federal background checks are the best source for factual data on gun sales, which gun manufacturers do not publicly release. This data is refined and relayed by the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF). The NSSF eliminates applications for conceal-carry permits (typically made by people who already own guns) from the data to give a better reflection of actual firearms purchases.

Through October 2016, background checks are up 15% compared to the same time last year, suggesting another a strong year of overall sales.

Wall Street expects Smith & Wesson’s revenue to increase 28% in 2016 and 11% next year, based on data from Thomson Reuters.


Let’s relax a little and go buy the guns that we really want to have, and let’s get back to enjoying that pursuit. It’s a far better feeling to buy something you’ve always wanted rather than something you might not be able to ever get again… So what’s on your Christmas shopping list?

black friday
christmas gift gun

Shooting Skills: Take a deep breath…

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…then let it out and read this to learn how to maximize on-target accuracy and consistency…


Glen Zediker


We’ve talked about what I call the “true fundamentals” of shooting. Put the sight on the target and pull the trigger without moving the sight… And we’ve talked about some of the mechanics, like natural point of aim, sight picture, and the trigger itself, that combine to assist this goal.

david tubb
Holding still sometimes takes more thought, and effort, than we might realize. Shooting well is a truly multi-faceted task that shooters like 11-time National Champion David Tubb have attended to through miniscule details, like being aware of the physical state continually while performing.

Another crucial and largely unknown element is controlling breathing. Right. That thing we do to stay awake and alive. Breathing can be a calculated technique among competitive shooters, and that is because the state of the body in the framework of making a shot is a defining element in the effectiveness of the shooting platform. That platform, by they way, is you!

I’ll break it down, and then offer a few suggestions on how to incorporate a better understanding of the dynamics of maintaining human oxygen supply.

When we are breathing when doing nothing in particular but living, we’re not taking the deepest breaths we can when we inhale, and we’re not expelling all the air we had when we exhale. We’re also not breathing in and out, in and out, in and out in constant successions. We breathe in to a comfortable level. Hold that a bit. We breathe out to a comfortable level. And then we hold that state for a bit. Then we very naturally breathe in again. These cycles are on a balanced rhythm, and a relatively shallow cycle. It’s a lot different than when we’re doing something strenuous, like running.

So. To fire a gun from our most stable state, make the trigger break in what shooting coaches call “the natural respiratory pause.” That’s the state between exhaling and inhaling. From a “human machine” standpoint, that’s when the body is most calm and stable.

breathing cycles for best shooting
Learn to use the natural pattern of your breathing to experience the most effective (steadiest) hold. When we breathe normally we don’t inhale as much air as we can hold and then blow it all out, and we also don’t breathe continually in and out, in and out. Rather, we simply inhale and exhale to levels that are comfortable to us. Take aim and fire the shot when you have reached what some call the “natural respiratory pause,” or the natural resting point prior to inhalation where we are “using” the oxygen we have retained.

It’s a narrow window. That window of opportunity varies widely depending on a lot of factors, but some experience dry-firing will show you where you stand.

When the body needs more oxygen, there are a few symptomatic results that get in the way of a steady hold. There are more eloquent ways to say it, but we get “the shakes.” The wobbles, the heaves and hos. It’s an unmistakable sensation. Visual acuity also diminishes. And, also, since we’re trying to finish something important (hit the target) anxiety takes over when we’re not getting cooperation between target and sight locations. Essentially, there’s an urge to slap the trigger and “get it over with.”

Do not “take a deep breath and hold it…” That supplies oxygen, to be sure. But it also creates tension in the body. Trying to keep that breath held has as bad an effect on stability as does trying to not breathe back in.

Breathing during a shot continually changes the location of the sight. Try it and you’ll see. Filling the lungs, emptying the lungs, both change the posture. From prone, it’s easy to see the effect on the vertical location of the sight. This, by the way, is the root of the “consistency” element of breathing. It’s very important to the goal to fire shot after shot after shot onto the same point.

Firing shots in succession, keep breathing, just time the shots with the natural pause. For a Rapid Fire event string in NRA High Power Rifle, which isn’t all that rapid (either 60 or 70 seconds to fire 10 rounds) I take a breath between each shot, and then settle down to my holding point. Now. Really rapid succession, like bam-bam-bam, it’s possible to fire quite a few well-directed rounds off of one pause. If that’s not enough, experiment with learning to take very shallow breaths in and out during the duration of the hose-down. I’ve used that “tactic” on very windy days when the standing position hold was a tad amount fluctuating, to avoid frequent restarts. It “works” for a couple of attempts to get a breakable sight picture, before muscle fatigue sets in.

Speaking of: there’s no question that the better physical condition someone is in, the better able they’ll be to extend a steady hold. Pulse also factors mightily: a beating heart moves the rifle. This is really evident shooting prone from a sling-supported position. A regular breathing pattern with no overt highs and lows combats heart rate increases. Taking in huge amounts of air prior to mounting up a rifle actually can backfire; that often causes a “spike” in body movement about 15 seconds afterward. Pulse quickens and becomes more intense when oxygen levels drop.

Main point here is do not “over-hold.” When you’re out of air, you’re out of time. Break it down, and start it again.


For more shooting tips and articles visit ZedikerPublishing.com; all are free to download. 

Progressive Press Tricks

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Progressive reloading presses are amazing and efficient ammo-creating machines, and they’re not just for pistols! Here’s a few tips on getting the most from yours. You can find the Hornady Lock-N-Load Progressive Press at Midsouth Shooters by Clicking Here!


Glen Zediker


A “progressive” press is a wondrous thing.

This is a machine (only word that fits) that progresses through loading operation stations via a rotating shell plate (well, most rotate, but some commercially-oriented units move straight-line). This plate incorporates a ratcheting mechanism that indexes a cartridge case into alignment with the next tool station with each cycle of the press handle (some require manual index-advancement of the plate, but most can be had as “automatic”). Another case is added with each stroke, as is another bullet at that station, so after the plate has been filled with cases, a loaded round is ejected and an empty case is added each cycle, with each stroke of the press handle.

It’s a compact-sized bench-mounted ammo assembly line.

hornady progressive
It’s not right at all to call a progressive an “automated turret.” Turrets have a head that moves; progressives have a shell-holding plate that moves. And, there are other operations embodied in a good progressive design that simply cannot be replicated with an auto-indexing turret.

In a progressive, each operation — case sizing, priming, propellant dispensing, bullet seating, and even more — is supplied by a toolhead that has four or more tool-containing bodies corresponding to the openings on the shell plate. Priming is accomplished via a primer dispenser, which is usually a tube containing primers coupled with an means to locate each primer such that it will be seated on the handle upstroke (shell plate coming down); almost always, this is coincidental with full-length sizing. The propellant dispenser form varies, but is another automated process that is linked (literally) to the press handle stroke.

Progressive loading machines are complex, but they can be well-conceived, well-made appliances that perform reliably. Results are largely up to the operator. More about that in a bit.

The cost and complexity of a progressive (related) primarily reflect its level of automation. A “basic” progressive requires the operator to manually position an empty case at the first station, manually advance the shell plate, and place a bullet in each case mouth. The more complex, and costly, machines have case and bullet feeders, and warning systems that give notice of diminishing components.

Keep a close watch on supply levels! The efficiency of a good progressive can warp time… Running one of the “big” progressives I am always surprised how quickly the primer supply and powder meter hopper empty.

Keep the machine clean and lubricated. This eliminates most function issues. Think about what’s going on here and it’s easy to see that a well-maintained machine will be a reliable and consistent machine. Remember that all operations revolve around the revolution of the shell plate. Keep it clean and lubed appropriately.

Mount a progressive securely on a rigid base. There is a lot (a lot) of pressure and stress involved in cycling a progressive, especially a “big” one. Again, think about what’s going on, how many duties are being processed each stroke, and consider those processes, and it’s clear that this big bad boy best be fastened down. It’s noticeably easier to operate a progressive when it’s mounted rigidly. Some progressives seat the primer on the press handle upstroke, some on the downstroke (most are on the upstroke). A rigidly-mounted press adds to the feel of this operation.

Get “good” dies. Most progressives, and certainly the popular machines, can accommodate any 7/8-14 threaded die. Feel free, and encouraged, to use the “better” sizing and seating dies, just as you might for a single-stage press.

Incorporate a good quality powder meter (something with a 7/8-14 attachment means). This can be done via a “conversion kit,” if the machine isn’t already outfitted with linkage that will cycle the powder meter operating handle. Makes a huge difference here, just as it does regardless of press type.

Address primer pockets. The priming operation inherent in a progressive doesn’t provide the feel of a bench-mounted or hand-operated tool. That’s not a problem at all if the primers are being seated fully using a progressive. To help ensure that they do, I think it’s wise to run a pocket uniformer. That way, the pocket will be what it should be, so the priming operation should likewise result in a well-seated primer. At the least, check each and every loaded round you get of a progressive for a high primer. Sometimes the machine needs to be adjusted, by the way, to seat primers fully.

Caveats? There are a few, not many.

I have long and often said that the big reason I don’t use a progressive for all my ammunition is because I really never get to see one run. By that I mean the increased ease and speed potential of a progressive is wasted on me because of my loading habits. It all stops, dead in its tracks, with case preparation steps, which includes the steps themselves and maybe even more the order in which I do them. Once I get my case prep work done, actually loading each round comes down to dispensing a propellant charge, putting a bullet into the case mouth, and running it up into a bullet seating die. I can do that rapidly. However! And here’s the hold up, before I get a cartridge case to that point, I have to do all the sizing operations on it. A bigger-scale progressive would give me the means to size each case fully, which is body, neck, and then neck inside, so there’s an extra operation (the inside neck sizing). Again, if there’s a threaded hole for a die and a station point underneath that, it could work for me. But if I have to do the sizing and then, say, trimming, everything breaks down, and slows down.

I’ve been most wrongfully accused of knocking progressives. Not even a little bit am I doing that. The closer your starting point (sizing a clean case) is to your ending point (seating a bullet) the better a progressive will reward you. That’s all’s I’m saying.

Hornady Progressive Press
Progressive reloading presses are not at all just for straight-wall pistol cases. High-quality, precisely-constructed ammo can be produced on a progressive. Just need the right tooling and the right approaches. A “big” progressive, like this Hornady, can handle virtually any cartridge.

You will find, and it will be a natural evolution of your approach, that there is larger volume preparation work done for progressives. All I intend to suggest in that is that, as round-count volume increases, so too will round-count preparation. When I use a progressive I tend to “save up” empties and run bigger batches. Ways you might find to improve handling larger quantities is to split up bench sessions for decapping, cleaning, trimming, applying lube (even though I don’t think they work all that well, the spray-on lubes work easiest for prepping large quantities of cases), or whatever else you do prior to announcing a case is fit for a reload. I really think you should decap cases prior to running them on a progressive. Keep the press as clean as you can. Primer grit residue doesn’t help. Pay special attention to the keeping the priming station area clean.

decapping die
I strongly recommend using a decapping die prior to placing the cases on the shellplate. There’s a lot of grit otherwise that’s getting onto the mechanism. Pay particular attention to progressive priming parts: be watchful for any debris that could conceivably detonate a primer; that could be catastrophic.

The preceding was adapted from Glen Zediker’s newest book, Top-Grade Ammo, now available! Visit ZedkerPublishing.com or BuyZedikerBooks.com for more information. 

NRA CEO to members “Our Time is Now”

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NRA Chief Executive Officer Wayne LaPierre has released a new video commentary titled “Our Time is Now,”  which applauds NRA members and gun owners who achieved the historic accomplishment of electing Donald Trump the 45th President of the United States and sending HRC on permanent political vacation. Continue reading NRA CEO to members “Our Time is Now”

Bulk Packaged Bullets

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by Ultimate Reloader

It’s time for a shameless plug! Our friend, Gavin Gear over at Ultimate Reloader, got a hold of some of our bulk bullets in .223 and .308, and since the release of this article, we’ve introduced our sample packs of the .308 Match Monsters. You can find those here.

Now, these bullets are NOT blems. None of them. These bullets are sent to us in bulk from major bullet manufactures. Nosler actually teamed up with us to bring the bulk savings, with match performance in the Match Monster. You can read Gavin’s entire article here.

What caliber of bullets would you like to see in the Shot Group Sample Packs?

Ruger Mark IV vs S&W Victory

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by 22plinkster

Although both are phenomenal pistols, and the person behind the trigger makes all the difference, there are variables which play a major roll in picking one pistol over another. What’s the take-down like? How well does she perform out of the box?

Our pal, 22plinkster stacks the Ruger Mark IV Target pistol, up against the S&W Victory. This test isn’t really based on how accurately they shoot, it’s based on one pros assessment of the overall pistol. Check out the video below!

Kel-Tec PMR 30: A Second Look

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This space-age pistol has a lot of uses. It’s a great pistol for hunting, personal defense, and target practice — and it’s also the fun gun of the century! Also, yes, at the time of the article being published Midsouth does have .22 MAG in stock. You can find it by clicking HERE.


Bob Campbell


Kel-Tec
This is a space-age pistol, but then it is a Kel-Tec! With modern construction, light weight and reliability this is one interesting handgun.

I came to the Kel-Tec PMR 30 in a different manner than I would have thought. My experience with their CMR 30 carbine solidified my confidence in the company and promoted my eager appreciation of this .22 Magnum self-loader. When I had the chance to obtain a PMR 30 pistol, I did not hesitate.

These handguns have been scarce on the market. The situation seems better now and I am seeing more PMR 30s in well-stocked shops. The PMR 30 is a unique and highly interesting handgun. This is a polymer frame pistol with a steel slide and barrel that works on the simple blowback principle. The first thing you notice after the space age appearance is that the pistol weighs less than 14 ounces. Even with a fully-loaded 30-round magazine, the piece weighs but 20 ounces. Yes, 20 ounces for a 30-shot pistol!

The pistol is quite narrow overall, although the grip must be deep enough to accommodate the .22 Magnum cartridge. Just the same, the handgun is manageable by all but the smallest hand sizes. The geometry of the grip is subtle until understood, and when looked at with an experienced eye the engineering is impressive. The safety is ambidextrous and offers ergonomic operation and easy reach.

The pistol is supplied with fiber optic front and rear sights. The sights offer excellent visibility and are precise enough for accurate fire well past 25 yards. The pistol is drilled and tapped for optics from the factory. The PMR 30 also features a light rail — unusual for a rimfire pistol. This rail accommodates popular lasers and combat lights including the LaserMax Spartan red laser.

Kel-Tec PMR-30 sights
Optics ready! Note fiber-optic rear sight — very bright — and the front fiber-optic sight is a good choice for rapid target acquisition.

Among the best features of this single-action handgun is the trigger action. The trigger is clean and crisp, breaking smoother than any factory trigger I’ve tried in recent memory.

The PMR 30 differs from most modern handguns in using a heel-type magazine release. While speed is better with the Browning-type button release, the heel-type magazine release is more secure. Just the same, with sufficient practice reasonable speed may be had with the heel-based system, and, with 30 rounds on tap, I do not foresee the need for a speed load. As heel-based latches go, the Kel-Tec is a good design and faster than most.

Kel-Tec
Note the heel based-magazine catch. With such a relatively long and heavy magazine this is a good choice, but it takes a little practice to perform efficient reloads.

Firing Tests
When loading the magazines, be certain to properly center each cartridge and bump the magazine every 5 or 6 rounds to ensure that the cartridges are seated. This improves reliability. The last few cartridges are rather difficult to load. For informal practice loading 15 to 20 rounds is a sound program and a little easier on the self.

Kel-Tec PMR-30 magazine
The 30-round PMR magazine is well-made of good material.

I have been able to test the pistol with a variety of ammunition, including the Fiocchi 40-grain JSP, Winchester’s 40-grain FMJ, the CCI 40-grain JHP, and Hornady’s 45-grain Critical Defense. There were no failures to feed, chamber, fire, or eject. Engineering a pistol to fire the rimmed .22 Magnum cartridge isn’t an easy task but Kel-Tec took the challenge and ran with it.

CCI
The PMR 30 eats a lot of ammunition quickly. It functioned flawlessly with all four different ammo selections I tried.

The pistol is a joy to handle and fire. Although the .22 Magnum exhibits a healthy muzzle blast, recoil isn’t a factor. A combination of a comfortable grip, excellent sights, and a crisp trigger make the pistol easy to land hits with. At close range, the pistol gave excellent results on the combat course, scoring X-ring hits at 5, 7, and 10 yards.

At a long 25 yards, I tested 3 loads. These were the Winchester 40-grain FMJ, the CCI Maxi Mag JHP, and the Fiocchi 40-grain JSP. Firing offhand, there was little difference in accuracy among all four. Boxes of 50 rounds each went all too quickly!

Bob Campbell
The PMR 30 is accurate in offhand fire. Firing quickly the Kel-Tec PMR is a controllable handgun. Get sighted on a target out to 50 yards and chances are you can hit it with a handgun that shoots as flat as a wire.

Shooting from a solid bench-rest firing position, the Kel-Tec was more than accurate enough for small game or pest control. The fastest load tested was the CCI Maxi Mag at a strong 1440 fps. The best group for accuracy was the Fiocchi 40-grain JSP at 3.5 inches, with the Winchester and CCI each cutting just below 4.0 inches. I suspect that with practice, the pistol may be more accurate, however, it is a light pistol and it takes practice to stabilize the piece.

Personal Defense
While I prefer a larger caliber, there is something to be said for a bullet with plenty of velocity. Hornady’s 45-grain Critical Defense load is designed for defense use and exhibits good penetration and expansion. I would recommend this load, and it is completely reliable in the Kel-Tec pistol. For the recoil-shy this is a first-class alternative to a larger caliber handgun.

Barber Leather Works
The Barber Leather Works Chameleon works well for concealing the PMR 30.

I, frankly, would rather have this pistol loaded with Hornady’s ammunition than a .32 or .380 pistol. Accuracy is good, hit probability is excellent, and you have a good reserve of ammunition. For those who like to practice, the PMR 30 is an alternative to harder-kicking pistols.

The PMR 30 is a surprising piece, well worth its price and one of the top fun guns of the century.


Calibers: .22 Mag. (.22WMR)
Action Type: semi-auto, hybrid blowback/locked-breech system
Frame: 7075 aluminum covered by glass-reinforced Nylon
Barrel length: 4.3″
Rifling: 1:16″ RH twist
Magazine: 30+1 rounds
Sights: Fiber Optic
Trigger pull: 3 lbs. 6 oz.
Overall Length: 7.9″
Weight: 13.6 oz.
Width: 1.3″
Height: 5.8″
Accessories: owner’s manual, hard case, trigger lock, and two magazines
Suggested Retail Price: $415

Kel-Tec.com


Bob Campbell is an established and well-respected outdoors writer, contributing regularly to many publications ranging from SWAT Magazine to Knifeworld. Bob has also authored three books: Holsters For Combat and Concealed Carry (Paladin Press), The 1911 Semi Auto (Stoeger Publishing), and The Handgun In Personal Defense (The Second Amendment Foundation).