Category Archives: Accessories

Massachusetts AG Effectively, Unilaterally Bans AR-15s and State-Compliant Variants

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube
Maura Healey, attorney general of Massachusetts,
Maura Healey, attorney general of Massachusetts,

Maura Healey, the attorney general of Massachusetts, recently rewrote the state’s 1998 Gun Control Act to reinterpret what it had meant since 1998.

Writing in the Boston Globe, Healey outlined the changes:

— The Massachusetts assault weapons ban mirrors the federal ban Congress allowed to expire in 2004. It prohibits the sale of specific weapons like the Colt AR-15 and AK-47 and explicitly bans “copies or duplicates” of those products.

— “Copies or duplicates” mean “state compliant” versions of Modern Sporting Rifles sold in Massachusetts. Such “state compliant” versions lack a flash suppressor, a folding or telescoping stock, or other helpful shooter features. The AG will notify all gun manufacturers and dealers to make clear that the sale of semi-auto rifles with certain features is now illegal in Massachusetts.

— The effect could mean that all AR-15s that have been modified to comply with Massachusetts law are now illegal purely because they are AR-15s. This could eventually outlaw all semi-automatic weapons in the state, which should violate D.C. v Heller’s explicit “common use” standard.

— Healey said in her Globe article that “if a gun’s operating system is essentially the same as that of a banned weapon, or if the gun has components that are interchangeable with those of a banned weapon, it’s a ‘copy’ or ‘duplicate,’ and it is illegal.”

Bottom Line: Some of our customers in Middle America will notice this state-law change and not be too concerned about it, because it is Massachusetts, and things like this are to be expected there.

Quite a few of our customers and fellow countrymen in the Bay State are now in limbo because basic AR-15 parts may turn a vanilla semi-auto rifle into “copies or duplicates” of those products.

Will this turn into another nudge in the direction of our fellow Americans losing their rights? There seems to have been a precedent set with California cities banning firearms, the strict laws placed in Chicago (which seems to be working, he lied), and other “leaders” treating their constituents more like an authoritarian society.

Hopefully the people of Massachusetts sound off in a clear, unified, voice at the ballot box this November.

Case Segregation: Neck-Wall Thickness

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

This is a specially-adapted excerpt from the forthcoming book, “Top Grade Ammo,” by author Glen Zediker, owner of Zediker Publishing. Click here to order from Midsouth.

by Glen Zediker

“Segregation” is sorting and separating. If someone is looking for the best performance, which, in my mind, is the most consistent performance, from stock-on-hand, then it’s a worthwhile chore. However, it is a chore. Keeping that in mind, the item below hopes to help a handloader decide how to proceed when there are 100 new pieces of brass set out on the workbench.

I segregate new brass for my tournament rounds. The “tournament” is NRA High Power Rifle. That’s fired at 200, 300, 600 yards. Clearly, the “best” of my brass goes to the 600-yard-line. I do this with new brass because, as I said in an earlier installment, cases should be kept with the same load, and I want to know my best cases before I fire-form with my 600-yard load. Keep same for same.

The questions are: How many piles do you want? and What criteria do you use?

This is an old photo of my segregation results on 100 WW-brand .223 cases. These sized cases were checked using a runout indicator. Here’s how it broke down, left to right: 7 were “flatliners,” under 0.0005; 32 were under 0.0010; 37 were at 0.0010; 18 were up to 0.0015; 6 were over 0.0015; none were more than 0.0020. That’s pretty good, as far as I know. Seems good. I need a total of 88 rounds for a tournament, so I had confidence in this brass. Tip to make your sorting easy: Go to a discount store and get a few small containers, something suitable to contain several cases. Get some masking tape and write the criteria or content (after you sort enough to get a range) and mark the containers. Then just pitch each case into the suitable container as each is measured.
This is an old photo of my segregation results on 100 WW-brand .223 cases. These sized cases were checked using a runout indicator. Here’s how it broke down, left to right: 7 were “flatliners,” under 0.0005; 32 were under 0.0010; 37 were at 0.0010; 18 were up to 0.0015; 6 were over 0.0015; none were more than 0.0020. That’s pretty good, as far as I know. Seems good. I need a total of 88 rounds for a tournament, so I had confidence in this brass. Tip to make your sorting easy: Go to a discount store and get a few small containers, something suitable to contain several cases. Get some masking tape and write the criteria or content (after you sort enough to get a range) and mark the containers. Then just pitch each case into the suitable container as each is measured.

In sorting cases, the finer the increments that define what you assess are Grade A, B, C (and possibly D, E, and F) cases, the greater the range encountered, and the fewer single examples that will occupy each group.

Establishing criteria limits (defining the contents of each pile) comes mostly from experience in checking examples of the stock. One thing you will learn from segregation is what the component is “supposed to be.” You’ll see a pattern. The more you measure, the more you’ll learn, and it will help to establish the criteria you end up banking on.

For me, I sort by wall-thickness variation, specifically, case-neck-wall-thickness variation. All other things being the same, and the tooling being what it should be, consistent case-neck walls result in bullets looking into the dead center of the rifle bore. Some call it “concentric,” and I do too.

You’ll need either an “inside” micrometer (which has a ball-end, made for tubing measurement) or, way faster and easier, a specialty fixture that incorporates a dial indicator. The micrometer will be more precise because it will provide a number in the 0.0001’s, but that gets back to the realism of the criteria. A quality dial indicator still shows less than 0.0010 variations, just look at the needle position between whole marks. Measure at 4 points around the neck. My expectation is “0” for my 600-yard brass: no variation, which really means I accept anything that’s under 0.0010. I end up with piles in 0.0005 increments: less than 0.0010, 0.0010, 0.0015, 0.0020, and any larger doesn’t get fired in competition. I do this because it’s direct and fast, and because I am looking for good, better, and best case groupings to coincide with my needs for 200, 300, and 600 yards.

This appliance is from Forster and is pretty versatile. Purpose-built, single-station tools are a little better to use, but, all around, something like this serves most well.
This appliance is from Forster and is pretty versatile. Purpose-built, single-station tools are a little better to use, but, all around, something like this serves most well.
Here’s how to use the tool to check wall thickness. Zero the indicator against the pilot/spindle and then read the dial with the case neck over the spindle; position the indicator about halfway down the neck. I read it at 12, 3, 6, 9 on the clock face. Understand that wall thickness variation and runout are related, but not directly.
Here’s how to use the tool to check wall thickness. Zero the indicator against the pilot/spindle and then read the dial with the case neck over the spindle; position the indicator about halfway down the neck. I read it at 12, 3, 6, 9 on the clock face. Understand that wall thickness variation and runout are related, but not directly.

If I get lazy, which is more common now than not, I size all the cases (to get the necks shaped up) and then check runout at the neck on another specialty tool: a concentricity fixture (some call it a “spinner”). The system I’ve been using here of late serves both duties. Make sure to have run some sort of inside-neck sizing appliance, either an expander in the sizing die or a mandrel after the fact. If not, the results will not be viable. This explanation isn’t too detailed, but the variations get “pushed” either inside or outside depending on the last tooling the case neck was treated to, and it needs to be pushed to the outside.

Does it really matter? Yes. There have been tests done by many trying to establish the point where wall variations or runout influenced group size. Since this point varies in different tests I’ve seen, I have to believe that the rifle/ammo combo has a mighty influence. It’s very likely that the better the package, the more sensitive it will be to showing up variations. I do know that when Hornady tested this at 200 yards (on their indoor range), they found that variation in wall thickness of 13% had a significant influence on group sizes; in this instance, that equated to about 0.0015 inches variation.

Reposition the hardware to check runout. This is not as precise as measuring thickness, but, in another way to look at it, provides more of a “what you get” evaluation. A 0.001 wall variance does not directly equal 0.001 measured runout. The basics of segregation: you can only find what you’re looking for. One tip: I get my most consistent, most accurate results by lifting and re-seating the indicator at each point I want to check rather than actually spinning the case and watching the indicator needle movement. It’s easy to check loaded rounds too, as shown. There’s a good deal of wobble in many factory loads, and if you rely on it for important shots (like on a big hunting trip) sometimes it’s good to know that you have the best-of-the-box in your pocket.
Reposition the hardware to check runout. This is not as precise as measuring thickness, but, in another way to look at it, provides more of a “what you get” evaluation. A 0.001 wall variance does not directly equal 0.001 measured runout. The basics of segregation: you can only find what you’re looking for. One tip: I get my most consistent, most accurate results by lifting and re-seating the indicator at each point I want to check rather than actually spinning the case and watching the indicator needle movement. It’s easy to check loaded rounds too, as shown. There’s a good deal of wobble in many factory loads, and if you rely on it for important shots (like on a big hunting trip) sometimes it’s good to know that you have the best-of-the-box in your pocket.

There is another popular and viable means of segregation and I’ll work that one next time. How you choose to segregate brass does have something to do with what the ammo is ultimately used for.

 

Iowa Legalizes Suppressors; Free Shoot Set for April 16

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

ASA-Map-March-31-2016

Iowa became the 42nd state to legalize suppressors when House File 2279, introduced by Rep. Matt Windschitl and Rep. Terry Baxter, was signed by Governor Terry Branstad on March 31. And to celebrate, a national suppressor-owners’ rights organization is throwing a free shoot next week.

After three years of efforts by the American Suppressor Association (ASA) and the Iowa Firearms Coalition (IFC) to educate lawmakers on the benefits and realities of suppressors, HF 2279 was met with positive response. The legislation passed earlier this session 46-4 in the Senate and 78-21 in the House.

Effective immediately, the new lawalso makes Iowa the 39th state to allow for the use of suppressors while hunting.

“The legalization of suppressors in Iowa is a tremendous victory for the law abiding citizens of The Hawkeye State,” said Knox Williams, President and Executive Director of the American Suppressor Association. “For the past three years, the ASA has worked alongside the Iowa Firearms Coalition, the National Rifle Association, Rep. Windschitl, and, this year, Rep. Baxter to get this legislation passed so that the sportsmen and women of Iowa could use these benign accessories to protect their hearing while in the field and at the range. We are incredibly excited that Iowa is now one of 42 states that allows suppressor ownership, and one of 39 states that allows their use while hunting.”

To celebrate the new law, the American Suppressor Association will be hosting a public suppressor shoot from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 16 at the Big Springs Shooting Complex.

To find the range, use Google Maps and search for the address, 5015 Highway 146, Searsboro, IA 50242. That will get you a pointer right by the range gate, according to the Big Springs Range website.

Knox said, “We will be bringing the top manufacturers from across the country to showcase their products, and educate any interested Iowans on why they should be excited that Iowa became the 42nd state to legalize suppressors. Admission and ammo are free, so we encourage you to join us!”

Cam-Over: Don’t Do It. Just Don’t.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

This is a specially-adapted excerpt from the forthcoming book, “Top Grade Ammo,” by author Glen Zediker, owner of Zediker Publishing. Click here to order from Midsouth.

by Glen Zediker

My approach to some topics has changed over the years. It used to be that I would state my version of the truth, and explain its origin, and that meant also that anything not said didn’t matter, to me, or to the advice and instruction I was set out to deliver. Well. The internet.

camming linkage effect
Here’s camming linkage and its effect. On left is the maximum height attained by the ram; on right is the ram position at the full-limit stop on the press handle. It’s 0.020 inches on this press. As long as the shellholder is not being contacted, presses with this sort of linkage have a smooth feel to them and do a little more positive job of sizing. In effect, the case gets sized twice (the ram elevates again just as the press handle is lowered). Linkage, either way, has zero effect on setting up a die because you measure what you get anyhow, and adjust the die accordingly, after you see what it is that you got.

If you’ve kept up with the advice presented in this space on the better way to set up a case-sizing die, this next has already been dispelled, but judging from some of the emails I received asking questions, here’s a little more. I’ve fielded a few about “camming-over” a reloading press.

Some reloading presses, and RCBS comes first to mind, are designed with eccentric linkage. The concept involves circular motion and linear motion, meaning that when the ram traveling in a linear path reaches full extension, the linkage, which is traveling in a circular path, can move through the 0-degree mark and go to a negative degree. What that does is change the press ram position at the very top of its travel limit to a lower position. As the handle is drawn downward, the ram top reaches its maximum height and, at the last little bit, lowers. The amount varies in different designs. This action is an asset to attain flush-plus contact with the shellholder and the bottom of the sizing die, for them that wants it.

Now, any substantial press, whether it has eccentric linkage or not, can produce the effect of camming-over. A Forster Co-Ax, for good example, can just about crush a chrome bumper and doesn’t have eccentric linkage. To set up that press, any press, to cam-over, turn the sizing die downward beyond what provides full and flush contact with the shellholder when the ram is at its full height. Say, another 1/8 turn down.

Then, when the press handle is fully depressed, the additional pressure in the last bit of the handle stroke goes toward flexing the press. Simple as that, and that is what camming-over does: flex the press. That’s true whether it has eccentric linkage or not.

Don’t do it. Just don’t.

A press like this can be set up to “cam-over,” which is really just set up to flex. Any press with enough leverage can warp on itself. I’ve heard it said that the (excessive) lock down between press ram and shell holder “brings everything into perfect alignment…” No it doesn’t. Bud, if your press ain’t straight, bending it more won’t help. By the way, it’s one reason why cast iron is the traditional and proven material for presses: it has the characteristics that allow for flex without permanent change, even though it’s pretty rigid. It’s the parts that aren’t cast iron that bear the brunt of continual flexing. This is a Forster Co-Ax, a press design, favored by the author).

There’s no need to cam-over a press for a case-sizing operation. It stresses the machine and the tooling. Dies can get deformed and bent, carbide dies can break, and the press itself can suffer. I’ve known them to break. Some say that presses are designed to “take it,” but there’s an eventual penalty for repeatedly taking any machine to its limits. Ask any racer.

The main point is this: It’s not necessary. And it’s wrong. Going over the previous material on using a cartridge case headspace gage to determine sizing die positioning to get the correct amount of case shoulder setback, it’s clear that this sure should occur at a point shy of full contact of the die bottom and the shellholder surfaces. And, if it’s not enough, trying to push a case farther into the die by crushing the shellholder against the die isn’t going to do much. Folks. Done is done. The flexing might, maybe (maybe), increase setback 0.001.

If your sizing die doesn’t adequately set back a case shoulder, have a machinist remove metal from the die bottom. Best to use a surface grinder to avoid messing with the heat-treat on the die.

I’m rehashing a few things already covered because they’re germane to the whole camming tactic. Tooling manufacturers tend to suggest the “turn the die down to the shellholder, and then another xx-th turn…” to ensure that someone’s reloads are plenty short enough in headspace to fit any rifle made out there. As mentioned a few times back, I applied that tactic with a new Forster Full-Length .223 Rem. die (without adding any extra down-turns to cam-over the press) and that netted 0.008 additional case shoulder height reduction on a new, unfired commercial case. A foolish amount, in my belief. Since I then adjusted the die to provide 0.004 setback from fired, which was 0.002 taller than the new case read (on my headspace gage), it’s clear that this die is not touching the shellholder to produce well-beyond-safe shoulder reduction. One-eighth turn is about 0.009 inches.

Harrell Precision Sportsman press
If your press isn’t straight, get one of these, my day-in, day-out favorite of the “big” presses: a Harrell’s Precision Sportsman. Billet-made and precise, and very powerful. It doesn’t have eccentric linkage, just extreme strength and precision alignment. A press doesn’t have to weigh a ton to be strong, and it doesn’t have to be pressured to deliver dead-consistent sizing results.

To find out if you have a “cammer,” run the press ram fully up (press handle fully down) and thread a die in until it touches the shellholder. Try to move the handle back down. If it won’t budge, it’s got eccentric linkage. It won’t move because the ram is trying raise again. Back out the die until the handle moves and pulls the ram away. It’s at this point where “flush” contact with a die bottom will be.

Camming-over a press is a “feel-good” measure for some folks: there’s this satisfying “ka-thunk” at the bottoming limit of press handle stroke, and that lets a loader know that he or she gave it all they could get. It’s just going to be too much. The only time it’s not is for bullet swaging operations, but those aren’t on my list.

Yeti Rambler vs. ORCA Chaser

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

The Yeti Rambler vs the ORCA Chaser

In the current market, you can take advantage of any number of high-end, trendy drink-ware at your disposal. Whether you think it’s a fad or not, there are some compelling arguments for investing a little more cash in order to keep your drinks cold all day, or hot for an extended period of time. Read on to see Midsouth’s Mellissa compare the ORCA Chaser 27 oz tumbler, versus the YETI Rambler 20 oz. tumbler. Granted, there’s are size difference here, but for the cost (difference of $5) and availability (the Rambler 30 oz. wasn’t available yet), it’s the most direct comparison we could come up with at the time. We plan to retest soon with the entire line of ORCA and Yeti Products. Just to reiterate, WE KNOW THESE ARE DIFFERENT SIZES! We’ve seen the comments, and read the emails.

How does the Orca Chaser stand up to the Yeti Rambler, Tervis Tumbler, and regular Travel Coffee Mugs?

We just received our Orca Chaser travel mug and decided to compare it to the Yeti Rambler and regular travel coffee mugs. Each mug will go through two 24 hour tests. One full day with a cold beverage and one full day with a hot beverage. For the cold beverage test we will fill up each mug to the brim with ice and then pour water to fill the mug all the way. We will let them sit for the full 24 hours checking at 3, 19, and 24 hours. For the second test we will fill each mug with hot coffee and repeat the process of the cold beverage.

Pictured are the Yeti Rambler, Orca Chaser, Tervis Tumbler, Stanley Mug, and other promotional drink holders
Pictured are the Yeti Rambler, Orca Chaser, Tervis Tumbler, Stanley Mug, and other promotional drink holders

Travel Mug Competitors-
Here is What Yeti and Orca Say
About Their Mugs:

Yeti Rambler
– “Don’t you hate it when your favorite beverage loses its frosty (or piping hot) goodness before you have a chance to fully enjoy it? We sure do, and that’s why we over-engineered our Rambler Tumblers with kitchen-grade 18/8 stainless steel and double-wall vacuum insulation. The result is a tough, hard-wearing personal drink cooler that maintains ice twice as long as plastic tumblers – and it works just as well for hot beverages. The lid that keeps your liquid in its place is easy to clean, shatterproof and crystal clear so you know exactly how much of your drink you still have to look forward to. Dishwasher safe. Size: 20oz and 30oz ”

Orca Chaser
– “Tired of watered down drinks? Can’t get from home to work without your coffee getting cold? The ORCA Chaser can fix that. In today’s world everyone is on the move. Whether you are going to work, the ball field, a tailgate, into the woods, down the dock, or to a party, the ORCA Chaser believes in getting you there with an ice-cold (or piping hot) liquid. The ORCA Chaser’s stainless steel double walled vacuum sealed body ensures that your ice will stay frozen and your drink will stay strong, while its clear lid makes it easy to see when it’s time for a refill.”
18/8 stainless steel double vacuum sealed body. Not dishwasher safe. Triton polymer clear lid and SIZE: 7″ height 27 fluid ounce capacity.

Other Travel Mugs Used In Comparison
– Here are the other mugs we used in the test. We won’t go into great detail about these but, if you want more info feel free to look it up. Insulated plastic and stainless steel: Tervis Tumbler, Stanley, Cool Gear, and Delton promo mug.

Facts and Comparison:

Honest Two Cents About The Yeti
– Our catalog guy borrowed his wife’s 20oz Yeti Rambler for the test. He had this to say in conclusion about the test:

“My wife loves that Rambler, so much so that she’s bought several as gifts for friends. She makes sure to let me know just about every morning that it Still Has Ice in it after however many hours it has been sitting there. She prefers the size of the 20oz Yeti over the Orca 27oz Chaser and the Yeti 30oz Rambler, and I can understand that. My thought is that the Orca is every bit as good as the Yeti and vice-versa. The Orca just fills a size in between the 2 Yetis.
From looking at the test results, I think the fact that the Orca held temperatures longer was only because of the volume. Had we have filled a Yeti 30oz Rambler and tested it, it probably would have won. My son has a Yeti also and loves it for coffee. The only complaint I’ve heard from the Rambler is the fact that the lid does not have a closable slot. This is the same for the Chaser and isn’t a deal breaker to me. The lids seal tight and won’t leak down the side, that’s what matters to me. The Yeti Rambler is a great product, and even though we don’t sell Yeti, I would still recommend it. As for me, I’m getting an Orca.”

Check out the video below:

Conclusion
– The Orca Chaser 27oz and Yeti Rambler 20oz were neck and neck, but by the end of our test, the Orca Chaser came out on top in both the hot and cold tests.
We all agree, it was hard to compare apples to apples with the sizes being different, but they are both really impressive beverage holders.

Hot and Cold liquid comparison chart
Hot and Cold liquid comparison chart


Currently, we only sell Orca products.The Yeti Rambler can be found at just about any sporting retailer or outdoor store in America. But, the Orca can be found right here- If you’d like more info or would like to try one for yourself click this link.

As new products begin to show up from ORCA, we plan to put each one through the ringer, making sure that you’re not just buying the hype, but a quality product, at a reasonable price. So far, we’re sold on ORCA, and excited to see the new offerings arrive this spring.

Do you have an ORCA or a YETI drink holder, or cooler? What’s your thoughts on their function vs. price? Hit the comments to give us your thoughts.

 

Top Hunting and Shooting Equipment Brands for 2015

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

shooting-hunting-survey graphicSouthwick Associates, a Fernandina Beach, Fla.–based market research and economics firm specializing in the hunting, shooting, sportfishing, and outdoor-recreation markets, released what it says are the top brands for many hunting- and shooting-product categories in 2015. This list was compiled from internet-based surveys completed in 2015 HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com panels.

Midsouth Shooters Supply looked over Southwick’s product-category winners and assembled the 10-most-popular category winners for 2015:

Reloading Components

Top Reloading Bullet Brand: Hornady

Top Reloading Primer Brand: CCI

Top Reloading Powder Brand: Hodgdon

Ammunition

Top Shotgun Ammunition Brand: Winchester

Top Rifle Ammunition Brand: Federal

Top Handgun Ammunition Brand: Winchester

Top Blackpowder Brand: Pyrodex

Shooting Equipment

Top Scope: Leupold

Top Muzzleloader: CVA

Top Holster/Ammo Belt Brand: Blackhawk

In a previous survey of people who said they reloaded, 88 percent cited “saving money” as the key reason. The survey, conducted in September 2015, said that “improving accuracy” was the second largest interest of handloaders at 70 percent. “Obtaining rounds difficult to find in stores” came in third with 40 percent, and “reducing waste” was cited as a reason by only 30 percent. Survey participants could choose more than one reason.

Of the types of ammunition reloaded, 76 percent reload rifle ammo, 64 percent reload for their handguns, and 30 percent reload shells for their shotguns.

“Over time, ammunition can be the most expensive aspect of recreational shooting, so it makes sense that avid shooters see reloading as a way to cut costs without cutting time at the range,” said Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates. “Of course, a key byproduct of saving money through reloading is a person also becomes more knowledgeable about their firearm’s performance and can even potentially achieve better performance by fine-tuning a specific load to their firearm.”

You can participate in the surveys at HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com.

How do these survey results stack up, in your opinion?

 

 

SHOT Show 2016 Special Edition: New Accessories

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Guest post by Peter B. Mathiesen, courtesy of  SHOT Daily.

The 2016 SHOT Show offers an overflowing array of tempting goodies, so much so that consumers may feel  overwhelmed at the task of figuring out what to buy in the coming year. To help out, we’re offering a sampler of some of the more interesting products from a vast and diverse assortment.

Advanced Technologies, Inc.

Given the phenomenal growth of the AR-15 pistol market, aftermarket supplier ATI sees an opportunity to help users of the popular Ruger Charger get more enjoyment out of its use. The AR-22 Pistol Stock System features a polymer receiver chassis and a T2 pistol grip as well as a six-sided aluminum free-floating forend that sports an FS8 nose cone. The T2-style pistol grip lowers a shooter’s hand to align the finger with the trigger, and the sure-grip texture helps reduce recoil. In addition, the stock also features a 16-inch aluminum Picatinny rail that runs the length of the receiver and forend for trouble-free optic and accessory mounting. SRP: $119.99. (atigunstocks.com)

American Furniture Classics

Feel safe and secure at home or in your truck with the Field Armory security cabinet. This stainless-steel cabinet is constructed of 2mm aluminum diamond plate and has secure storage for five long guns. The guns are secured during transport by hook-and-loop straps. Dual gas shocks provide stability when the lid is open, and the metal drawers feature rubber seals and ball-bearing glides to help make opening and closing easier. Sturdy stainless-steel side handles complete the package. The unit will fit under most tonneau covers. SRP: $999. (americanfurniture classics.com)

Ammo Up

Cleanup at the range is always a chore, but a clever device known as the Compact Ammo-Up makes it a bit easier and faster. With it, a shooter can collect spent brass and shotshells without bending over. The device will pick up a wide variety of casings, including .380, 9mm, 10mm, .40, .45 Auto, .38 Special, .308/7.62, and .223/5.56. A shotgun version picks up both shotgun shells and wads. SRP: $59.99. (ammoupusa.com)

Bear Metal Clean

Employing green chemistry, odor-free G-Tip gun cleaning swabs offer an environmentally friendly alternative to petroleum-based oils and solvents. The pointed tips easily work into tight areas inside receiver and trigger assemblies. The natural ingredients lubricate, clean, condition, and protect metal surfaces. The product uses American-made, biodegradable, bio-renewable, and bio-sustainable ingredients. The swab kits come in three sizes—small, medium, and large. SRP: starts at $27. Booth #N501. (bearmetalclean.com)

Breakthrough Clean Technologies

Battle Born High-Purity Oil is a blend of synthetic oils that includes extreme pressure additives, corrosion inhibitors, and anti-oxidant, anti-foam, and anti-wear additives. Its unique combination provides effective firearm lubrication and protection in extreme environmental conditions for extended service under high and low temperature conditions (from -90°F to 417°F). It’s safe to use on all metal, plastic, and polymer parts, and is water- and steam-resistant. It reduces friction and wear, and is non-flammable, non-toxic, odorless, non-staining, and fully synthetic. SRP: $8.95. (breakthroughclean.com)

CrossBreed Carry Holsters 

The late Mark Craighead was an avid shooter, reloader, and concealed-carry permit holder who was introduced to firearms at a young age. That ultimately led to a fascination with holsters.

After collecting his proverbial “box of holsters,” Craighead decided to create a design of his own, incorporating the best features of other holsters and discarding the non-functional elements. In doing so, he managed to handcraft a new breed of holsters, which were marketed by the company he founded—CrossBreed Holsters. Within a couple of years, his hybrid holster design had achieved such popularity that the company gained national recognition as a leading manufacturer of some of the best and most functional concealment holsters available on the market. Each holster is handmade by craftsmen who were personally trained by Craighead, and these craftsmen continue to pass on the skills, traditions, and attention to detail to a new generation of craftsmen who have joined the company.

For 2016, CrossBreed Holsters is introducing the latest in its line of handcrafted holsters, the Freedom Carry. The line was created in response to consumer demand for more versatile carrying tools. What sets this new holster apart from its predecessors is that it can be worn in several positions without sacrificing comfort. The holster also allows the user to carry larger firearms in the appendix position. The Freedom Carry is available for more than 300 different firearms, including those with lights, lasers, and micro red-dot sights (depending on model). CrossBreed Holsters offers a two-week, try-it-free guarantee as well as a lifetime warranty on selected items. (crossbreedholsters.com)

Galco

Previously available only for semi-auto pistols, the WalkAbout holster, part of Galco’s Carry Lite line, is now available for revolvers. The holster’s open top allows a fast draw while the reinforced mouth allows a smooth and easy return to the holster. A sturdy injection-molded nylon clip secures the holster on the belt. The holster carries the handgun in a vertical orientation, with no cant or angle, making it suitable for both traditional strong-side carry and the increasingly popular appendix position. Constructed of comfortable premium Center Cut Steerhide, the WalkAbout fits belts up to 1 ¾ inches wide. SRP: $39.95. (galco gunleather.com)

IMR Powders

Sitting between the IMR 4451 and IMR 7977 on the burn-rate chart, IMR 4955 is an ideal choice for many popular calibers such as the .270 Winchester, the .25/06 Remington, and the .300 Winchester Magnum. Enduron Technology maintains accuracy over longer shooting sessions, thanks to a special additive that helps remove copper fouling as the rifle is fired. In addition, the powder’s small grain size helps it flow easily through a powder measure. SRP: $207.99 (per 8-pound keg). (imrpowder.com)

Knight & Hale

To diversify the sounds a box call can produce, Knight & Hale has integrated a patented simple-to-use quick-release system into the new Switchblade box call. Featuring three different paddles made from three distinct types of wood, the call replicates the calls of three different hens. The box itself is a custom, one-piece design capable of producing loud tones that carry even on windy days, yet also can provide soft, ultra-realistic sounds to pull a wary tom in those final few yards. The lids can be removed without noisy Velcro or snaps for silent travel. SRP: $34.95. (knightand hale.com)

Mayville Engineering

The 100E portable clay target machine has a capacity of 135 targets and a throwing distance of 85 yards. Available in various models to match the desired discipline, including Skeet, ATA, and Sporting Clay, the 100E is ideal for recreational backyard shooting or for a small club. SRP: $995. (mecshootingsports.com)

Levy’s Leathers 

The handmade leather LTD/SN22D1 cobra-style sling is constructed of a vegetable-tanned leather top and soft suede backing. Decorative pattern stitching runs the length of the sling. It is adjustable from 28 to 36 inches and fits 1-inch swivels. SRP: $67.70. (levysleathers.com)

Mad Calls

Unlike a conventional, rectangular CNC-shaped box call, the Billy Yargus Easy Touch Box is formed and glued with curved sideboards that are stretched around a canoe-shaped frame. The curved walls create greater surface area contact with the lid, which yields a fuller, richer sound. The curved sidewalls are solid on one side and grooved on the other, giving callers two different tone options to attract fickle gobblers. Made from glued mahogany with jatoba (Brazilian cherry). SRP: $49.99. (flambeauoutdoors.com)

Pelican Products

Designed to traverse tough terrain with ease, the Pelican 80QT Elite Wheeled Cooler has heavy-duty 8-inch wheels with an extended pull handle. Additional adventure-friendly features include a built-in bottle opener, a lid-integrated fish scale, and raised anti-skid feet. Certified bear-resistant by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee, it’s perfect for any hunter camping in the wilderness. All Pelican Elite Coolers are built to exacting military standards and are engineered with rugged polymer exterior walls that feature an industry-leading 2-inch polyurethane foam core, which ensures extreme ice retention. Additional advanced features include secure press and pull latches, a freezer-grade O-ring seal, and dual molded-in handles for easy transport and tie-off. SRP: $549.95. (pelicanprogear.com)

Skull Hooker 

The new Table Hooker is an elegant way to display a wide variety of small- to medium-sized game skulls on office desks or shelves. Appropriate species, to name a few,  include cougar, bear, pronghorn, impala, and deer. SRP: $59.95. (skullhooker.com)

Summit Treestands

Both the Pro and the Sport harnesses feature high-performance tethers, quick-release buckles, padded shoulder straps, and include a lineman’s climbing belt. In addition, each line features a Women’s Pro and Women’s Sport version to meet the needs and fit of female hunters. All harnesses have a maximum weight rating of 300 pounds, and the Pro Harness line includes a bungee tether line and a military-inspired attachment system for complete accessory customization. Both harnesses meet industry standards recognized by Treestand Manufacturers Association. SRP: $99.99. (summitstands.com)

Swagger LLC

The Swagger bipod provides shooting agility with quick maneuvering in any terrain or situation. Swagger’s patented and adjustable Crazy Legs are flexible, which allows you to easily move forward or back, up or down, left or right as the shot dictates. With Swagger, you can shoot prone, sitting, or standing. Swagger also retracts into the chassis for easy, quiet transport. SRP: $219.99. (swaggerbipods.com)

Thermacell

Unlike disposable air-activated handwarmer packets, which offer only one heat level and must be thrown away after each use, Thermacell’s pair of rechargeable heat packs provides users with three different temperature settings. Available in two different sizes, the warmers run up to six hours per charge (when set on low). The warmers have an easy push-button control to turn the unit on and off and to set the desired heat level. Recharge time is approximately four hours. SRP: $79.99, pocket warmer; $69.99, handwarmer. (thermacell.com)

Wiley X

Wiley X has a long tradition of providing absolute premium protection, and the new WX Rogue is no exception. Offered in two- or three-lens interchangeable kits, the WX Rogue has an understated matte black frame with strategically designed lenses that provides a clean line of sight for maximum peripheral vision and protection.

The adjustable wire core rubberized nose bridge ensures comfort at all sight levels. Wiley X’s T-Shell scratch-resistant and Foil anti-fog-coated Selenite polycarbonate lenses deliver confidence of protection that meets ANSI Z87.1-2010 High Velocity, High Mass Impact Safety & Optical standards, as well as the military’s MIL-PRF-32432(GL) ballistic standards. Case, strap and cleaning cloth included. (Optional RX insert available.)SRP: starts at $95.99. (wileyx.com)

YETI

The Hopper 40 was designed to carry big food-and-beverage cargo with ease. It has a carrying capacity of up to 36 cans plus ice, but is still portable. The heavy-duty construction and HydroLok leakproof zipper make it anything but soft. Take it to the bonfire, on your next hunting trip, or use it any time you need to carry a large load. SRP: $399.99. (yeti coolers.com)

Reporting by SHOT Business Daily, reprinted with permission. SHOT Daily, produced by The Bonnier Corporation and the National Shooting Sports Foundation, covers all facets of the yearly firearms-industry show. Click here to see full issues. Product pricing and availability are at of time of publication and subject to change without notice.