Category Archives: Hunting

TWRA Annual Elk Hunt Raffle is Back and Bigger!

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by Richard Logsdon

Following an incredibly successful effort last year, an elk tag for the 2019 Tennessee elk hunt will be available again this year through a raffle to be held by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Foundation (TWRF). Last year the effort raised more than $220,000 for the Tennessee elk management program. Previously, when the tag was sold at auction, the most ever raised was $17,000.

This year a single ticket costs $20. Three tickets are available for $50, and 10 can be purchased for $100 and are on sale now until August 2. There is no limit to the number of raffle tickets that can be purchased.

The grand prize winner will have the opportunity to participate in the October 2019 rifle elk hunt in the premier Elk Hunting Zone within North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area. In addition to the elk tag, the grand prize winner will also receive a Best of the West Mountain Scout Rifle, with a Huskermaw Blue Diamond long range scope, and the option to have it filmed for an episode of The Best of the West Outdoor television series.

In addition to the grand prize, the TWRF has secured four other prize packages. A complete list of the prizes can be found at www.twrf.net.

Since the elk hunt was implemented in 2009, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has donated a permit to a Non-Governmental Organization to join other participants who will be chosen from a computer drawing.

“The Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission’s decision to offer an additional conservation tag is an innovative way to raise additional funding for habitat management and restoration,” said Joey Woodard, TWRF executive director. “We are proud to support the TWRA in this effort, and we have partnered with leaders in the outdoors industry to help us grow this initiative.”

Raffle tickets may be purchased online directly from the TWRF website.

2019 Tennessee Elk Tag Raffle

A Chance to Hunt Elk in Tennessee and Win Great Prizes.

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Grand Prize

The Grand Prize winner will have the opportunity to participate in the fall 2019 rifle elk hunt on North Cumberland WMA in the premier Elk Hunting Zone 1. The Grand Prize winner will also receive The Best of the West Mountain Scout Rifle in 6.5 PRC topped with a Huskemaw 4-16×42 Blue Diamond long range scope. (Valued at $8,900) But that’s not all, the winner can have their elk hunt filmed for an episode of The Best of the West outdoor television series.


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2nd Prize

A 2019 Polaris Ranger 570 in Pursuit Camo. The RANGER® 570 delivers the best-in-class 2-person utility side-by-side performance with 44 HP and True On-Demand All Wheel Drive. This workhorse is equipped with the features you need to get the job done, and the comfort you want for a day on the trails or around the property. (Valued at $10,200)


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3rd Prize

$2,500.00 Bass Pro Shops/Cabela’s Gift Card. Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s offers the most comprehensive selection of Fishing, Hunting, Camping, Boating, and Outdoor Gear, that you will find anywhere. The Gift Card can be redeemed for online purchases, catalog orders, and purchases made at Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s retail stores.


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4th Prize

Knight .50 Caliber Mountaineer Muzzleloader. The Mountaineer features a 27” fluted solid 416 stainless steel match grade Green Mountain barrel with a laminated straight stock finished in nutmeg. This beautiful muzzleloader is claimed by many to be the most reliable and accurate muzzle loader on the market today, guaranteed MOA to 200 yards. (Valued at $1,125)


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5th Prize

Hunters Gear Package.
Grizzly 40 Quart Cooler.
• Pack Rabbit E.T.H. Chest Vest.
• Pack Rabbit BCH60 Versatile Pack System.
• ESEE JG5 Fixed Blade Knife.
• LaCrosse Footwear Gift Certificate for any pair of LaCrosse boots.
(Package valued at $1,100)

The deadline for purchasing tickets is Friday, August 2 at 11:59 p.m. (CDT). The electronic drawing will be held Aug. 5 and the winners will be announced at the commission’s Aug. 16 meeting.

“The results from last year’s raffle generated $224,840 in revenue and there was only one lucky winner,” said Woodard. “Although there’s still only one elk tag up for grabs, participants will have five chances to win valuable prizes this year and that should generate even more ticket sales to support conservation.”

TWRF is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting habitat conservation, responsible land stewardship, and Tennessee’s hunting and fishing heritage for the benefit of TWRA and Tennessee’s outdoor enthusiasts.

New Federal Law Will Promote Target Range Development on Public Lands

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Some good news! The Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Ac amended the P-R Act to provide states greater opportunities to use the P-R funds apportioned to them for public range development.

hunter safety

SOURCE: NRA-ILA

On May 10, President Trump signed the Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act into law. This NRA-backed law will help promote firearm safety and training and enjoyment of the shooting sports by freeing up more federal funds for use in public shooting range development and construction.

Beginning in 1937 with the passage of the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act — commonly known as the Pittman-Robertson Act (P-R Act) — federal excise taxes on firearms, ammunition, and archery equipment have been returned to the states to help promote wildlife conservation and restoration. Participating states must ensure that hunting license fees are used exclusively for the administration of the state’s fish and game department.

Fifty percent of the excise tax revenue from handguns, bows, and arrows may be used for hunter education programs and the development and operation of archery and firearm shooting ranges. Additionally, there is an $8 million annual set-aside for firearm and bow hunter education and safety program grants within the states, which can also help fund ranges.

The P-R Act has been critical in preserving America’s hunting and sport-shooting heritage. State wildlife management programs have brought back species that in the early 1900s were in severe decline or on the brink of extinction, including white tailed deer, wild turkey, and wood ducks. Managed hunting, of course, plays a critical role in this responsible stewardship.

The Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act (S. 94/H.R. 1222) amended the P-R Act to provide states greater opportunities to use the P-R funds apportioned to them for public range development.

First, the Act reduces the states’ mandatory matching share for a range development project from 25% to 10% (a state, in other words, only needs to provide 10% of the funding, while P-R funds can provide up to 90%).

It also extends the time a state has to obligate and expend the funds for range development from two fiscal years to five fiscal years.

Finally, the Act provides a new revenue stream for funding range development. It will allow up to 10% of specified apportionments from the wildlife restoration account to be used for this purpose. These funds were formerly unavailable for range construction, maintenance, or expansion projects.

We encourage states to take full advantage of the increased opportunities this new law will provide for them to build or expand safe, convenient, and modern accommodations for residents and visitors to responsibly exercise their Second Amendment rights.

 

ESPN Sportscaster Attacks Sportsman

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ESPN’s Keith Olbermann attacks a young Mississippi hunter for harvesting a turkey in turkey season. READ IT ALL

white turkey terror

SOURCE: NRA-ILA

Perhaps jealous of all of the negative coverage his MSNBC protégé has received in recent days, last week ESPN host Keith Olbermann launched an unhinged Twitter attack against a Mississippi turkey hunter that earned the political commentator widespread scorn.

The target of Olbermann’s ire was 22-year-old outdoorsman Hunter Waltman. A turkey hunter, Waltman was the subject of a piece in Jackson, Mississippi’s Clarion Ledger. The article chronicled how Waltman lawfully harvested a rare white wild turkey. Olbermann also took issue with the newspaper’s outdoors writer Brian Broom for reporting on Waltman’s accomplishment.

On March 26, Olbermann tweeted out a link to the Clarion Ledger story and mocked Waltman, commenting “It be rare and beautiful so me should kill it.” Olbermann went on to state, “This pea-brained scumbag identifies himself as Hunter Waltman and we should do our best to make the rest of his life a living hell. And the nitwit clown who wrote this fawning piece should be fired.”

Olbermann doesn’t appear to have a general problem with harvesting turkeys for human consumption, reserving his scorn only for those who do so in the most ethical manner. Some astute observers pointed out that in the 1990s Olbermann served as a commercial spokesman for fast food chain Boston Market. In one television spot, the self-appointed gobbler guardian can be seen hawking a “$4 turkey melt BLT combo.”

In a follow-up article about Olbermann’s belligerent comments, Waltman noted that as a result of the ESPN host’s actions he had been on the receiving end of online harassment. Waltman told the Clarion Ledger, “They text me all kinds of stuff. If he (Olbermann) hadn’t done that, none of this would have happened.” The young hunter added, “To tell you the truth, it seemed like a threat to me…Make (my) life ‘a living hell?’ That seems like a threat to me.”

In addressing the matter, Bloom’s editor at the Clarion ledger showed support for both his writer and Waltman. With an obvious sarcasm, Clarion-Ledger’s Executive Editor Sam R. Hall tweeted, “@KeithOlbermann says @BrianBroom should be fired for writing this story. What was I thinking? I guess I should have fired our outdoors writer for writing about a hunter killing an unusual turkey during turkey hunting season.” Hall went on to note, “Keith Olbermann‘s tweet was recklessly irresponsible. Someone with his following needs to understand the possible impact of his words. Telling over 1 million people to make someone’s life a living hell could have seriously dangerous consequences,” adding, “In our newsroom, that would be a fireable offense, not writing a story about a hunter bagging a turkey.”

After receiving significant criticism for his remarks about Waltman, Olbermann apologized to the hunter on Twitter. On March 27, Olbermann wrote, “I am an opponent of trophy hunting and remain so, but nobody should feel threatened. This was anything but my intent, so I unreservedly apologize to Mr. Waltman for this tweet.” Given that Olbermann explicitly called on his followers “to make the rest of [Waltman’s] life a living hell,” readers will have to judge for themselves the sincerity of the ESPN host’s apology. ESPN responded to the controversy with a statement that said, “We have spoken to him about not making personal attacks.”

Having to address the outlandish political statements of its on air personalities is a recurring problem for ESPN. In late 2017, the network’s ombudsman admitted that the purported sports station was “awash in rising political tide.” Amidst slumping ratings, in early 2018 the network promised to return its flagship SportsCenter program “to its roots as a hub of news and highlights” rather than political commentary. Olbermann is a current host of SportsCenter.

Olbermann’s latest outburst will cause some to question the network’s commitment to this return to form. It is anyone’s guess as to whether whatever internal action ESPN might have taken will be enough to prevent Olbermann from indulging his bizarre prejudices in the future.

VIDEO: Shooting With Leupold’s Custom Dial System

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Leupold’s CDS gives shooters the opportunity to get a truly custom scope. Read about and it and check out the VIDEO. MORE

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SOURCE: Leupold

The Leupold Custom Dial System (CDS) provides a simple way to compensate for ballistic performance customized for your rifle and load.

Each CDS is unique, taking all practical ballistic and environmental factors into account. It’s laser-inscribed just for you! Once the CDS elevation dial is installed, just range the target, dial to the correct position, aim dead-on, and hit the target.

CDS takes into account all of the following:
Cartridge & Caliber
Bullet Weight
Bullet Make/Brand
Bullet Type
Ballistic Coefficient
Muzzle Velocity
Average Elevation
Average Temperature
Sight Height
Zero Distance

The CDS System works by laser-inscribing your scope’s elevation dial to match your load, velocity, and conditions based on the information you provide. Your CDS-equipped scope will be in perfect sync with the way your rifle and load shoots (handloads included).

Check out this video by Leupold with Fred Eichler and Leupold’s Tim Lesser.

It’s amazing! WATCH IT HERE

Check out more amazing Leupold Products Here!

Time’s Running Out to Win This TN Elk Tag!

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Still looking for your trophy of a lifetime?

Bag a Big Tennessee Elk
Bag a Big Tennessee Elk!

The hunt dates are October 13-19, 2018. If the hunter has not been successful in Zone 1 after 7 days, then all the zones will be available for an additional 7 days. EHZ 1 is a 6,827 acre zone that has been hunted since 2009. The zone was rested during the 2015 and 2016 seasons. The zone has a very high success rate and contains multiple wildlife openings.

Bass Pro Shops will sweeten the deal even further by outfitting the winner with a brand new Tikka T3X Lite Stainless bolt-action rifle in 7mm Rem Mag topped with an Oculus Pro Team HD 3x9x40mm rifle scope.

Oculus Pro
Oculus Pro Team HD 3x9x40mm rifle scope
Tikka T3X Lite
Tikka T3X Lite Stainless bolt-action rifle in 7mm Rem. Mag

The raffle winner will be announced at the TFWC August 23-24 meeting.

10 raffle tickets are still available but only through midnight, August 15, 2018.

One lucky winner will be selected to participate in the fall 2018 rifle elk hunt on North Cumberland WMA in the premier Elk Hunting Zone 1.

The hunt dates are October 13-19, 2018. If the hunter has not been successful in Zone 1 after 7 days, then all the zones will be available for an additional 7 days. 

EHZ 1 is a 6,827 acre zone that has been hunted since 2009. The zone was rested during the 2015 and 2016 seasons. The zone has a very high success rate and contains multiple wildlife openings.

The winner will also be outfitted with a brand new Tikka T3X Lite Stainless bolt-action rifle in 7mm Rem. Mag topped with an Oculus Pro Team HD 3x9x40mm rifle scope.

For only $10 per ticket you get a chance at a once-in-a-lifetime hunting opportunity and a prize package valued at more than $1,000. There is no limit on the number of raffle tickets a customer can purchase. Take your best shot at a Tennessee trophy elk and enter today! Raffle and hunt details can be found by visiting the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Foundation site.

Tennessee state law requires that you must be at least 18 years old to enter. You need not be present to win. The winner must be a U.S. citizen eligible to legally own a firearm according to federal law. The winner is responsible for all taxes and fees associated with the prize, and must possess the required licenses and permits to participate in the hunt.

Connie King, District 6 Commissioner for TWRA recently stated, “This is the first year for the elk raffle. Previously it had been a draw for a few very lucky people then an auction for one tag. With the raffle,  all participants are winners to some extent since each raffle dollar will contribute to the success of the elk program here in Tn.”

To purchase your ticket, head over to the Foundation’s website https://www.twrf.net/store/2018-elk-tag-raffle or the TWRA website https://gooutdoorstennessee.com The cost is $10 per ticket and there is no limit on how many a customer may purchase (handling fee may apply).

Too Young or Too Old… To Own a Gun?

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The latest approach to “Goldilocks-style Gun Control” seeks to restrict gun ownership with age limits on “both ends.” READ MORE

gun rights denied

SOURCE: NRA-ILA

A common theme among anti-gun extremists is what we often refer to as the “Goldilocks” approach to limiting access to firearms by law-abiding citizens. Rather than admit that the ultimate goal is to disarm all Americans, those opposed to the Second Amendment create fictional arguments about why certain types of firearms, ammunition, or even accessories should be eliminated.

In the 70s, the goal was to ban handguns. Since they could be carried concealed for personal protection, they were seen as being “too small.” That argument fell out of fashion as more and more states passed Right-to-Carry laws that recognized the right to personal protection.

One subset of the anti-handgun hysteria included inexpensive handguns (so-called “Saturday Night Specials”), which were deemed “too cheap.” When NRA and others pointed out this was an obvious attempt to disarm lower income citizens (who are often at higher risk to being victims of violent crime), the term “Saturday Night Special” faded from the gun-ban lexicon.

Another subset of the attack on handguns came with the introduction of Glocks, and other handguns that used polymers as part of their construction. These were falsely claimed to be able to pass through metal detectors and x-ray machines undetected, and, thus, “too invisible” to be screened where firearm are prohibited (think airports). Of course, this canard was quickly dispelled.

Ammunition has been attacked as “too lethal,” “too untraceable,” “too bad for the environment (lead),” “too inexpensive (so tax it),” and any number of other “toos.”

Rifles have been called “too powerful,” “too modifiable,” “too accurate,” “too similar to actual military arms,” and the list goes on.

Boiled down to its essence, after wading through myriad “too this” and “too that” arguments, the just-right “Goldilocks” of guns would likely be a break-action .22 rifle, although finding acceptable lead-free ammunition might be a bit difficult. But anti-gun extremists can still claim they don’t want to ban “all” guns.

The latest approach to “Goldilocks-style Gun Control,” though, seems to be focusing less on what you can own, and focusing more on who can own firearms. And we don’t mean people with criminal records.

After the horrific tragedy that took place in Parkland, Florida, this year, age became the new battle cry for those seeking to limit gun ownership. Rather than focusing on the obvious failures at various levels of government to identify the copious warning signs exhibited by the alleged perpetrator, extremists decided to focus on the fact that law-abiding citizens are able to exercise their rights protected under the Second Amendment when they reach the age of 18. Although responsible young adults regularly leave home, join the military, get married, and begin voting at this age, the anti-gun community has decided this age is too young for one to exercise the right of gun ownership.

Eighteen-year-olds have not been prohibited from purchasing and possessing rifles and shotguns at the federal level, and in the vast majority of states, since the founding of our country. Nonetheless, because of the violent acts of one individual, we have seen an onslaught of legislation throughout the country that seeks to raise the minimum age to purchase and/or possess rifles and shotguns from 18 to 21. Because common sense has taken a back seat to raw emotionalism in today’s gun control debate, some of these efforts have seen success.

But being deemed “too young” to own firearms isn’t the only threat to face the pro-Second Amendment community. There may be a new approach beginning to form. You might soon be deemed “too old.”

An article by JoNel Aleccia and Melissa Bailey, published by Kaiser Health News (KHN) and PBS NewsHour, has begun making the rounds with a number of media outlets, such as CNN, and it discusses the issue of gun owners who may be suffering from dementia. Sort of.

Dementia can be a devastating disorder. It is a category of diseases, including Alzheimer’s, that affects the brain, and its impact on individuals varies widely. Mild forms can lead to simple cognitive declines, such as slight memory loss, that are little different than one would experience during the normal aging process. More severe and advanced cases of dementia, on the other hand, can lead to dramatic changes in those afflicted that would require professional health care, and perhaps even commitment to a dedicate healthcare facility.

Of course, discussing the problem of dementia is a conversation worthy of having. Unfortunately, the KHN/PBS article is riddled with language that sounds like it came straight from one of the gun-ban groups being funded by anti-gun billionaire Michael Bloomberg. We can only presume it is likely to be used to promote anti-gun policies that focus on prohibition, and ignore reason and constitutional considerations.

The tone of the article (a lengthy one) is set early, when it inaccurately describes our nation with the all-too-commonly heard inflammatory claim that, today, “America copes with an epidemic of gun violence….” In fact, America’s murder rate has fallen to a near all-time low. If anything, we have been doing remarkably well since the violent crime peak in the early 90s, with violent crime and murder rates decreasing by about half.

But repeating anti-gun rhetoric is just the start.

Aleccia and Bailey go on to refer to an analysis of Washington state survey data that claims approximately 54,000 residents who are 65 and older have “some cognitive decline” as well as a firearm in the home. Is this really important to note? No, because two key facts are ignored.

First, cognitive decline is common among the elderly, and can manifest itself as simply slight memory loss. It does not mean dementia is present. In fact, the epidemiologist who analyzed the survey data even “cautions that the answers are self-reported and that people who’ve actually been diagnosed with dementia likely are unable to respond to the survey.” So now, rather than dementia being the concern, it’s simply old age.

Second, the story refers to these people (again, likely just elderly folks with no known mental disorder) having “access to weapons,” as if that is a concern. However, they may not even have access. The survey apparently asked if there was a firearm in the home. The person surveyed could very well be living in a home that has firearms in it, but not have access to the firearm. A son or daughter who takes in a parent, for example, could be the person who owns the firearm in the home, and may not allow others access to it.

The authors also seem to lament, “Only five states have laws allowing families to petition a court to temporarily seize weapons from people who exhibit dangerous behavior.” These are the so-called “red flag” or “extreme risk protection order” laws that are being promoted nationwide. They generally lack sufficient due process protections necessary for deprivation of a constitutional right and are often rife for abuse.

Furthermore, dementia is not a “temporary” disease. It has no cure. If an individual is exhibiting “dangerous behavior,” it is, in all likelihood, going to continue, and probably increase. All states have a process to seek to have someone’s competency adjudicated or be involuntarily committed, which could result in a more permanent firearm prohibition. And, these laws generally protect due process by allowing individuals to put on their own defense and challenge the allegation before having their rights infringed by the state.

To make matters worse, Aleccia and Bailey also spoke with long-time anti-gun researcher Garen Wintemute, as part of their parroting of the false argument that NRA has stopped “public health research into the effects of gun violence.” Wintemute is the director of the anti-gun University of California Firearm Violence Research Center, so it is clear that there is research going on.

Ultimately, while the subject of treatment for dementia patients is a very serious issue that deserves more scientific inquiry, using such a terrible disease as a pretext to preemptively disarm elderly Americans is unacceptable. As we have said many times before, NRA supports any reasonable steps to fix America’s broken mental health system. But if the debate is going to move towards one more Goldilocks argument suggesting that just getting “too old” is reason enough to confiscate firearms, as this article might suggest, then that is a debate we will not bear.

TN Wildlife Resources Foundation Elk Sponsored Raffle

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Elk Raffle Designed by TWRF
Want one of these?

The 2018 Tennessee Elk Conservation Tag was awarded to the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Foundation (TWRF), a 501(c)3 nonprofit. This coveted tag will be raffled off on August 16, 2018, and the proceeds will benefit elk habitat restoration efforts in Tennessee. One lucky winner will be selected to participate in the Fall 2018 Rifle Elk Hunt on North Cumberland WMA in the premier Elk Hunting Zone 1.

The hunt dates are October 13-19, 2018. If the hunter has not been successful in Zone 1 after 7 days, then all the zones will be available for an additional 7 days. EHZ 1 is a 6,827 acre zone that has been hunted since 2009. The zone was rested during the 2015 and 2016 seasons. The zone has a very high success rate and contains multiple wildlife openings.

Bass Pro Shops will sweeten the deal even further by outfitting the winner with a brand new Tikka T3X Lite Stainless bolt-action rifle in 7mm Rem Mag topped with an Oculus Pro Team HD 3x9x40mm rifle scope.

Oculus Pro
Oculus Pro Team HD 3x9x40mm rifle scope

That’s right… for only $10 per ticket you get a chance at a once-in-a-lifetime hunting opportunity and a prize package valued at more than $1,000. There is no limit on the number of entries per customer. 90% of the proceeds from the raffle go directly to the Elk Restoration Program.

Tikka T3X Lite
Tikka T3X Lite Stainless bolt-action rifle in 7mm Rem. Mag

Take your best shot at a Tennessee trophy elk and enter today!

The raffle winner will be announced at the TFWC August 23-24 meeting.

elk hunt

Tennessee state law requires that you must be at least 18 years old to enter. You need not be present to win. The winner must be a U.S. citizen eligible to legally own a firearm according to federal law. The winner is responsible for all taxes and fees associated with the prize, and must possess the required licenses and permits to participate in the hunt.

To purchase your ticket, head over to the Foundation’s website https://www.twrf.net/store/2018-elk-tag-raffle or the TWRA website https://gooutdoorstennessee.com The cost is $10 per ticket and there is no limit on how many a customer may purchase (handling fee may apply).

Julie Golob Named To Hunting and Shooting Sports Conservation Council

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Great news for hunters and recreational shooters: Julie Golob, pro shooter for Smith & Wesson will help lead the way for expanded outdoor opportunities for us all. READ MORE

julie golob

SOURCE: NRA

Last week, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke announced the members of the Hunting and Shooting Sports Conservation Council. In addition to Chris Cox, the executive director of NRA-ILA, Smith & Wesson pro shooter and NRA Board Member Julie Golob has been named to the Council.

“What an exciting time for our hunting and shooting sports! This Shooting Sports Council is yet another way Secretary Zinke and staff is making the expansion of our great American heritage a priority,” said Golob. “It’s an honor for me to be a part of it alongside so many influential and truly passionate leaders in outdoors sports.”

“America’s hunters and recreational shooters have a champion in Secretary Ryan Zinke,” said Cox. “Zinke is fighting for our sportsmen and women to have greater access to our public lands. I am pleased to work with the Trump Administration’s new Hunting and Shooting Sports Conservation Council to make it easier for Americans to enjoy our public lands.”

The Council was established earlier this year to provide the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture with advice on recreational hunting, recreational shooting sports, wildlife and habitat conservation. Additionally, the Council will examine ways to encourage partnership among the public, sporting conservation organizations, state, tribal, territorial, and the federal government.

“Over a century ago, Teddy Roosevelt established the American conservation ethic — best science, best practices, greatest good, longest term,” said Secretary Zinke. “These sportsmen carry on the American conservation ethic in the modern day. Bringing these experts together will be key to ensuring the American tradition of hunting and shooting, as well as the conservation benefits of these practices, carries on.”

NEW: Sig Sauer BDX

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Sig Electro-Optics unveils Ballistic Data Xchange (BDX) rangefinders and riflescopes. VERY COOL! Read more…

SOURCE: Sig Sauer Press Release, May 4, 2018 —

SIG SAUER® Electro-Optics Transforms Hunting with the launch of BDX™

Sierra 3 BDX 3.5-10x42mm
Sierra 3 BDX 3.5-10x42mm.

The SIG SAUER Electro-Optics division unveiled their all new Ballistic Data Xchange (BDX) rangefinders and riflescopes with integrated Applied Ballistics® and wireless Bluetooth® technology. This groundbreaking BDX technology enables interoperability and key ballistic holdover information to be exchanged wirelessly between SIG SAUER BDX Electro-Optics products. The foundation of the BDX system was designed for simplicity and ease of use. SIG SAUER BDX requires no new learning, and uses the same tools hunters and shooters have been using for years.

How does BDX work? The BDX rangefinder and riflescope system is simple, fast, and intuitive. Simply download the “SIG BDX” app available for Android or iOS smartphones, pair the KILO BDX rangefinder and SIERRA3BDX riflescope, set up a basic ballistic profile, and then you’re ready to shoot or hunt. Once you are in the field, range your target as you normally would, and the KILO BDX rangefinder will utilize onboard Applied Ballistics Ultralight™ to instantly send your dope to the scope via Bluetooth. Using your basic ballistic profile the ballistic solution is calculated for your target and will instantly illuminate on the BDX-R1 Digital Ballistic Reticle with windage and elevation holds in the SIERRA3BDX riflescope. A blue LED on the riflescope power selector indicates that the BDX system is paired, and when the reticle has received new ballistic holdover and windage data from the rangefinder. “Rangefinding riflescopes of the past have had two major shortcomings: they are either big, boxy and heavy, or extremely expensive,” said Andy York, president, SIG SAUER Electro-Optics. “The revolutionary and affordable BDX system packs advanced ballistics technology into a simple platform that looks just like the rangefinder and riflescope that every hunter is using today. It is extremely simple to use; range a target, put the digital ballistic holdover dot on target, pull the trigger, impact. Incredibly accurate and extremely simple, just connect the dot.”

Connect the Dots

The BDX family of rangefinders includes: KILO1400BDX, KILO1800BDX, KILO2200BDX, KILO2400BDX, and KILO3000BDX rangefinder binocular. These rangefinders include many of the legacy features that the KILO name was built on: Lightwave DSP™ digital rangefinder engine, Hyperscan™ with 4 times per second scan rate, RangeLock™, and the Lumatic™ auto-adjusting display. Available in 3.5-10x42mm, 4.5-14x44mm, 4.5-14x50mm, and 6.5-20x52mm, the SIERRA3BDX riflescopes have the look, feel, weight, and size of traditional riflescopes. They feature HD glass for superior resolution and optical clarity, 30mm main tubes, side-focus parallax adjustments, and the LevelPlex™ digital anti-cant system. The BDX-R1 Digital Ballistic Reticle is the evolution of holdover, providing a ballistic solution out to 800 yards with 1 MOA of accuracy.

Rounding out these superior features is SIG SAUER’s kinetic energy transfer indicator: KinETHIC™. KinETHIC provides assistance in assuring an ethical hunt by indicating when energy on target drops below a threshold that can be set by the hunter using the BDX App. “Ethics in hunting are a contract we make with ourselves based on the standards we as sportsmen adhere to as a group, what we feel good about personally, and respect for the game and our hunting traditions,” said Andy York president, SIG SAUER Electro-Optics. “KinETHIC is a feature that asks the hunter to make an educated and ethical decision beforehand by taking into consideration what the velocity and energy capabilities of your bullet and load are to deliver a killing shot. It then lets you know if the shot you are about to take will fulfill this contract. If not, it provides a visual affirmation to stalk-in closer. Knowing your maximum effective hunting range is more than just knowing what you can hit.”

KILO BDX Rangefinders starting at $249.99 MSRP
SIERRA3BDX Riflescopes starting at $499.99 MSRP

Available at Midsouth Shooters in mid July, but you can PRE-ORDER yours HERE!

All SIG SAUER Electro-Optics are covered by the SIG SAUER INFINITE GUARANTEE™, and electronic components under our LIMITED 5-YEAR warranty. Please see sigsauer.com for full details. 

SEE MORE HERE

REVIEW: Leupold FX-II 4x28mm Handgun Scope

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Looking for a high-performance scope to realize the accuracy potential of your handgun? Get a good one… READ MORE

leupold handgun scope

by Major Pandemic

During my review of the EXTAR AR15 pistol, I saw that it had accuracy potential far more than what people give the AR15 pistol format credit for. This pistol deserved a fitting optic that could take advantage of the accuracy without diminishing its close-range capabilities. I chose the Leupold FX-II 4x28mm scope. This scope has enough magnification to exploit the potential of the AR15 pistol format but also plenty of eye relief for arms-length aiming.

EXTAR
Adding this Leupold FX-II brought out the full accuracy potential of this fine EXTAR pistol.

FIT, FINISH, FEEL, FEATURES & FUNCTIONS
Leupold has a long and well-deserved reputation for high-quality optics. Leupold really only makes two pistol models: the FX-II fixed power 4X magnification and the VX-3 variable power scope.
Compared to a rifle scope, handgun optics are actually subjected to higher than normal recoil due to the lower weight of the firearm, and the sometimes very powerful cartridges being shot in handguns. In the past, some shooters used triple or quad rings to help distribute recoil more evenly to the scope tube and provide more rigidity. The reality, though, is that lower quality optics just do not hold up to the punishment some handguns dish out. Leupold pistol scopes are famous for their durability on heavy recoiling pistols. And they have a warranty that will put anyone’s mind at ease.

The Leupold 4x FX-II pistol scope offers all the usual Leupold optic features including their Multicoat 4, Xtended Twilight Lens System, Diamondcoat II and other proprietary image, reflection, light transmission, and durability enhancements. Leupold also delivers some impressive gas waterproofing which actually increases image quality as well.

The 4x FX-II features Twin Bias Spring Erector System, Super Fast-Focus Eyepiece, Lockable Fast-Focus Eyepiece, Clasic/Standard Lockable Eyepiece, Micro-Friction 1/4 MOA, and 1/4 MOA Finger Click. With a 1-inch tube diameter 6061-T6 aircraft quality aluminum main tube the FX-II delivers a simple mountable scope with very common and less expensive rings.

leupold fx
Leupold makes some of the finest and most durable optics on the planet.

Most people incorporate far too much magnification on both handguns and rifles. The 4X Leupold FX-II handgun scope delivers a usable magnification that is not frustrating to hold steady at arms-length. Once you up magnification beyond that, you can become frustrated with a reticle which keeps jumping around unless shots are taken from an very stable rest. 4X magnification on a handgun is just right and provides the precision needed to reach out beyond distances that eyesight and iron sights can deliver.

Having shot behind a number of handgun optics, the biggest challenge is having an optic that delivers a large enough eye-relief box/window. If the eye-relief box is too narrow, the shooter is constantly fighting the distance the gun is from the eye to see the full field of view and reticle. The Leupold delivers a huge flexible eye-relief box which enables you to concentrate on the target and not finding the right scope mount length.

FINAL THOUGHTS
The Leupold FX-II Handgun scope delivers a proven and reliable design which is specifically built to take the increased punishment a handgun can deliver even the really big handgun rounds like 45-70 and even .308. Obviously the EXTAR 5.56 AR15 pistol didn’t even phase this scope, however it did deliver a super light pistol which when equipped with a scope was more than accurate enough for varminting and plinking all the way out to the 300-yard-line.

leupold fx-II specs

Check it out HERE at Midsouth
Leupold information HERE
Extar

Major Pandemic

[Major Pandemic is an editor at large who loves everything about shooting, hunting, the outdoors, and all those lifesaving little survival related products. His goal is simple, tell a good story in the form of a truthful review all while having fun. He contributes content to a wide variety of print and digital magazines and newsletters for companies and manufacturers throughout the industry with content exposure to over 2M readers monthly. Click HERE to learn more.]