Category Archives: Hunting

Meet The Hunter Who Stands Up To Those Who Call Her A ‘Murderer’

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America’s hunters are increasingly under fire by political extremists. Here’s one NRA Member who won’t take that sitting down. READ MORE

brit longoria

SOURCE: NRA-ILA

Hunter and philanthropic consultant Britt Longoria has been at the center of an online hate campaign by animal rights extremists who don’t understand where their food comes from, and who show little understanding of what it’s like to actually hunt. The experience caused Longoria, who had previously kept her passion for hunting private, to open up and share her story.

Q: On your blog, you say you’ve been the butt of insults and threats by people who think of hunting as “murder.” Why do you think there are so many misconceptions about hunting? Where do you think that comes from?

Hollywood glamorizes death — and that’s just not reality. There’s a disconnect between what we see in the movies and what actually happens on the ground. Harvesting a life is a very humbling and emotional experience. Today, many people have no idea where the meat in the deli aisle at the super market comes from. They don’t necessarily make that connection that a living creature had to die for that ham sandwich. In order to live, we cause death. Our very survival impacts the world around us. Nothing is impact-free.

Q: What can we, as NRA members, do to change these misconceptions? Is it worth it to engage with the haters? What’s your advice on how best to do that?

Unfortunately, some of those misconceptions are actually our own fault. With social media, it’s all about how we present ourselves and the images we put out there. If we are only presenting what I call “grip-and-grin” trophy photos of our hunts, that doesn’t capture the full experience. We need to present the whole story of the hunt. That means showing what led up to that moment, and what happened next. We need to share how we feel on a hunt. Instead of trying to win over the haters with facts and figures about wildlife conservation and our economic impact, we really need to engage the haters on an emotional level. Non-hunters may not necessarily want to go hunting, but it helps them understand us as individuals. No one can argue with you when you are sharing your emotions with them. And if they’re not arguing, they are listening. And if they’re listening, perhaps they will learn something.

Q: Not long ago, you took a group of young boys out for their first bird hunt. You said it was interesting to hear them talk casually about the death and violence they saw on their favorite TV shows, and then to see their reaction when they saw it in real life and hunted their first bird. Can you tell us about that experience?

As I drove the vehicle, I listened to the boys, ages 9-11, behind me talking about one of their favorite TV shows, “The Walking Dead.” I was shocked by the level of violence they were describing in the show and how casually they were talking about it. But as soon as one of the boys shot a bird and the dog retrieved it, the boys were suddenly grossed out by the sight of the dog saliva and blood on the bird. None of them wanted to touch it. I quickly gutted the bird and pulled out the breast and showed them the meat. In that moment they realized, perhaps for the first time, where their chicken nuggets come from. It was a real eye-opening process for them to see how quickly something can go from being alive to a food source. They learned it wasn’t gross or icky, but natural. By the end of the afternoon, they were handling the birds and understanding the anatomy and different feathers.

Q: You’ve been blasted online for posting pictures of you smiling after a successful hunt. What’s happening in those pictures? What kind of emotions are you feeling that the snapshot doesn’t convey?

Snapshots do not convey the depth of the hunting experience, and the full range of emotions behind the intentional harvesting of a life in the wild. As hunters, we need to do a better job of telling our stories on social media. Behind every trophy picture is a roller coaster of emotions: we feel humbled, relieved, sad, and thankful. And above all, there is deep gratitude for the animal who gave its life.

 

California: Governor Newsom Signs Anti-Gun Bills Into Law

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Seven new anti-gun bills are now law in California. Oh wait… And one more Monday makes eight! READ MORE

california

SOURCE: NRA-ILA

Last Friday, Governor Newsom signed seven anti-gun bills into law — continuing the assault on our Second Amendment rights in the Golden State. These new laws pile onto the hundreds of existing laws and, like the others, will be equally ignored by criminals. Your NRA will not back down while we explore further action on these new laws.

Assembly Bill 12, sponsored by Assembly Member Jacqui Irwin (D-44), would extend the duration of California’s “gun violence restraining order” law from one year to a period of up to five years. Meaning a person could be prohibited from owning and possessing firearms for five years at a time without ever being adjudicated as dangerously mentally ill or convicted of a crime.

Assembly Bill 61, sponsored by Assembly Member Philip Ting (D-19), would expand the list of those eligible to file “gun violence restraining orders” beyond the currently authorized petitioners, which include immediate family and law enforcement. The new list is expanded to employers, coworkers and employees of a secondary or postsecondary school that the person has attended in the last 6 months. GVRO’s can remove a person’s Second Amendment rights, not based on criminal convictions or mental health adjudications, but based on third party allegations, often without due process until weeks after a person’s rights have been suspended.

Assembly Bill 879, sponsored by Assembly Member Mike Gipson (D-64), would require precursor firearms parts to be sold/transferred through a licensed precursor parts dealer in a similar process to the new laws regarding ammunition purchases. It would further create a registry of these parts and a new crime for transfer of precursor parts without the involvement of a licensed precursor parts dealer to anyone under 21 years of age or prohibited from owning firearms. Precursor parts include items such as unfinished frames and receivers.

Assembly Bill 893, sponsored by Assembly Member Todd Gloria (D-78), would prohibit the sale of firearms and ammunition at the Del Mar fairgrounds located in the 22nd District Agricultural Association on and after January 1, 2021.

Assembly Bill 1297, sponsored by Assembly Member Kevin McCarty (D-7), would remove the maximum fee a local authority can charge on the concealed carry permit application.

Assembly Bill 1669, sponsored by Assembly Member Rob Bonta (D-18), would raise the fees paid by consumers when purchasing firearms. The DROS account has generated a massive surplus at times, so much so that tens of millions of dollars that have been utilized to fund other DOJ programs, including a $24 million dollar loan to the Armed Prohibited Persons System (APPS) just a few years ago. This legislation appears nothing more than an effort to put more cost constraints on gun owners to foot the bill for the massive cost pressures the legislature has put on DOJ in recent years including ammunition background checks and long gun registration.

Senate Bill 61, sponsored by Senator Anthony Portantino (D-25), as amended would expand California’s existing one handgun a month law to also apply to handguns or centerfire semi-automatic rifles, with limited exceptions. Further the bill expands the prohibition on acquisition of firearms by a person under 21 years of age by eliminating the existing exception for 18-20 year-olds with a valid hunting license.

But that’s not all folks!

California: Anti-Gun and Anti-Hunting Bill Signed into Law

Prior to the October 13 deadline, Governor Newsom signed the final anti-gun and anti-hunting bills, AB 1254 and SB 172 into law. These two bills, combined with the seven anti-gun bills just shown and signed into law on Friday, made it a tough year for gun owners and sportsmen in the Golden State as our Second Amendment Rights and Hunting Heritage were under an all out assault. Your NRA will not back down and will continue to explore further action on these new laws.

Assembly Bill 1254, sponsored by Sydney Kamlager-Dove (D-54) would prohibit the ability to hunt, trap or otherwise take a bobcat except in specified circumstances including depredation permits.

Senate Bill 172, sponsored by Senator Anthony Portantino (D-25), would expand California’s existing storage laws and includes harsh penalties, such as a 10 year ban on firearm ownership.

 

 

SKILLS: My Caliber Crisis: Do I Need A 10mm?

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Every gun owner at some time is compelled to test the waters with a new cartridge. Here are Tom McHale’s thoughts on his latest pursuit. READ MORE

10mm
The 10mm and the Springfield Armory Range Officer Elite Operator makes for a potent combination.

SOURCE: Springfield-Armory Armory Life, by Tom McHale

I’m having another caliber crisis.

Over the years, I’ve ventured into cartridge odysseys that include unusual chamberings like .357 Sig and 300 Blackout. More recently, I’m kind of developing a thing for 10mm. I’ve been testing out a Springfield Armory Range Officer Elite Operator chambered in the big-boy version of the .40 S&W and I’m kinda liking it. There are definitely some benefits. Let’s discuss.

Weight and Velocity
We’re going to argue forever about whether the light, small and fast 9mm is as good as the heavy, fat and slow .45 ACP, so why not just choose heavy, moderately portly and fast?

The 10mm, when fired from the Springfield Armory Range Officer Elite Operator, launches 200-grain bullets in the 1,100 feet per second velocity band. That’s the mid-weight of the .45 ACP bullet family and the mid-velocity range of 9mm.

How Powerful is a 10mm?
Many stand in awe of the 10mm, likely because it has a simple, yet badass name. Then there’s the fact that the FBI moved to it (sort of) for a time. It’s hard to argue with credentials like that.

Being the inquisitive sort, I wanted to see how it stands up to all the other common cartridges and a few other kinetic energy-generating objects. So, I dug up my database from all the ammunition and guns I’ve tested over the years and looked up a pile of actual cartridge, velocity, kinetic energy, and momentum calculations for some representative samples.

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The 10mm is the big-boy version of the .40 S&W, and offers a lot of punch downrange.

As a side note, I like to look at both kinetic energy and momentum to tell the whole story of how “powerful” a cartridge is. Kinetic energy is easy — we all know “foot-pounds” as a standard measure of “oomph.” However, kinetic energy emphasizes velocity the way it’s calculated, so a super-light bullet can have huge foot-pound numbers simply because it’s moving fast. The slow and fat projectile crowd likes to take bullet weight into consideration and that’s where the momentum calculation comes into play.

At the risk of insulting physics, you might think of kinetic energy as destructive power, like a power drill. And you might think of momentum as the ability for one object to move another. The more weight the “mover” object has, the more powerful it is. Think wrecking balls. They don’t move all that fast, but few of us would want to be hit with one.

Anyway, I fired several different loads from the Springfield Armory Range Officer Elite Operator pistol you see in the picture above and recorded velocity so I could run the numbers. Just for fun, I did the math on a few other non-shooting moving objects and added in info on several other chamberings.

So, what does all this mean? Here are the important learnings —

The 10mm mostly tops the charts for “rational” handgun power levels. Sure, a .44 Magnum brings half again more kinetic energy, but unless you’re Dirty Harry, it’s not the most practical carry handgun.

If you’re a foot-pounds junkie, 10mm thumps 9mm, .40 S&W and .45 ACP.

The 10mm and .357 Magnum are similar from a kinetic energy perspective. While the .357 Magnum uses a much lighter projectile, it moves a lot faster, hence the high foot-pound count.

A 10mm has about the same momentum as a PGA drive launched by Bubba Watson, although I’m pretty sure the 10mm projectile will win handily in the penetration and expansion tests. Sorry Bubba.

10mm

Capacity
There’s nothing to write home about here. Normal capacity for a 10mm is virtually identical to that of a .40 S&W. That’s because the case diameter is the same, although the 10mm cartridges are longer. Remember, the whole point of the .40 S&W “great compromise” was to offer more capacity than a .45 ACP pistol while launching larger bullets than a 9mm.

While 10mm is powerful, it’s by no means the uncontrollable “hand-cannon” that many have claimed. In a solid gun like the Range Officer Elite Operator, it’s more than manageable.

But What About Recoil?
I think the real recoil penalty (or lack thereof) is what makes the 10mm interesting. While it’s not as easy to control as a 9mm or .40 S&W, it’s not all that different from that of a .45 ACP pistol of the same weight. What you feel as recoil depends largely on the weight of the pistol, so if you’re comparing a steel 1911 chambered in .45 ACP to one packing 10mm, the numbers work out about the same.

I won’t bore you with the common-core math details, but the recoil energy of a .45 ACP 1911 and 10mm 1911 works out to 5.43 and 6.28 foot-pounds. To put those numbers in perspective, the same math on much lighter Springfield Armory XD-S pistols in 9mm, .40 S&W and .45 ACP works out to 5.07, 6.92 and 8.15 foot-pounds.

The Bottom Line
Here’s my take. If you want a gun that’s super-duper easy to control so you can deliver rapid-fire strings without the sights moving, buy a steel 9mm like a Range Officer or EMP. If you want more power in a semi-automatic package that’s as carry friendly as a .45, consider the 10mm. You might fit an extra round or two in a gun of similar size owing to the smaller cartridge diameter while fulfilling your need for speed.

10mm

Tom McHale
Tom is a perpetual student of all things gun and shooting related. He’s particularly passionate about self and home defense and the rights of all to protect themselves and their loved ones. As part of his ongoing learning, Tom has completed dozens of training programs and is a certified National Rifle Association instructor for pistol and shotgun. Tom is a professional writer by trade these days and has published seven books on guns, shooting, reloading, concealed carry, and holsters. In between book projects, Tom has published somewhere in the neighborhood of 1,700 articles for about a dozen gun and shooting publications. If he’s not writing, you can probably find him on the range.

Springfield Armory® recommends you seek qualified and competent training from a certified instructor prior to handling any firearm and be sure to read your owner’s manual. These articles are considered to be suggestions and not recommendations from Springfield Armory. The views and opinions expressed on this website are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Springfield Armory.

Virginia Hunters Raise $17,684.89 to Feed the Hungry

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Amazing program puts needed vittles on the table all at the hands, donations, and efforts of hunters. READ MORE

va hunters logo

SOURCE: NRA Hunters Leadership Forum, Phil Phillips

It is a fact that hunters are the world’s top conservationists and do more for wildlife than any other group. But what many people don’t know is how much we hunters care about our fellow man and how proactive we are in helping people in our own communities to fight hunger. For nearly 30 years, we have been helping to feed those less fortunate through the Hunters for the Hungry (HFTH) movement, sharing the wild game we harvest through state-based programs where we hunt and live. By donating and in many cases also paying to process the meat, we are providing a high-protein, low-cholesterol meat source to those who otherwise would go hungry.

va nters for the hungry

For someone who spends a fair amount of time in Virginia, I am proud that one of the most prominent HFTH programs is Virginia Hunters Who Care (VHWC). Launched in 1991, it has provided more than 27.7 million quarter-pound servings to feed hungry Virginians to date. VHWC holds fundraisers across the state that my wife and I try and attend, the most recent being the 8th annual VHWC banquet in Manassas, Va., on July 20, where hunters mobilized to net $17,684.89. For anyone who thinks a gathering of hunters could not possibly make such a difference, VHWC Projects Coordinator Gary Arrington says this dollar amount is enough to fund the processing and distribution of 79,582 quarter-pound servings of venison.

Welcoming supporters to the event, Arrington shared an incredible eye-opener on why hunters taking action is so important. “One in eight families in Virginia alone is impacted by hunger,” he said. “Nearly one million emergency meals are served in the state each month, and nearly 50 percent of those receiving meat through the program are children and the elderly.” Think about that for a moment. Thanks to VHWC, in just eight years Arrington said this single fundraising event has raised $165,303.89, which equates to 743,867 quarter-pound servings of high-protein, low-fat venison going to men, women and children across the state.

In fighting hunger just outside our nation’s capital, Arrington added, “We want you to know the difference you make. We’re processing venison for 93 cents per pound so it goes a long way.” He explained it takes all of us in the hunting community, singling out the event’s corporate sponsors including Cabela’s and Sportsman’s Warehouse, conservation groups like the NRA and local chapters of Ducks Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation and Safari Club International. “Please support these groups,” he urged. “Do business with the company that makes it possible for us to feed people.”

Arrington’s blessing for the meal included a prayer for freedom and to watch over and care for our fellow man and acknowledged VHWC founder David Horne, who passed away in 2002. Giving a heartfelt thank you, he said, “On behalf of Hunters for the Hungry and all those whose lives are touched by your generosity, thank you for all that you are and all that you do in support of our program.”

Arrington said VHWC’s goal for 2019 is to yield 325,000 pounds of venison with the ultimate goal of processing and distributing more than 500,000 pounds of meat per year. “In Virginia we are blessed with a bountiful whitetail deer herd and with donations of deer and successful program funding,” he said, “we continue to be able to provide an average of 1.2 million quarter-pound servings each year. We will process and distribute 4.5 quarter-pound servings for each dollar raised here tonight.”

va nters for the hungry

Witnessing the Launch of a Movement
Like every other hunter who is aware of HFTH, I am a proud supporter. Before the national hunter-backed movement had an official name, as a Colorado outfitter in the late 1980s, I wanted to do my part to make sure every ounce of protein was used from the game animals my clients harvested to help others enjoy the health benefits of the low-cholesterol, high-protein venison. I started a similar program with my hunters who did not need or could not take their meat home. We covered the processing fees so I legally could donate the processed meat to senior living centers and needy families. Some recipients were older people who could not hunt any longer and missed the opportunity to have wild game in the freezer. But in most cases, I witnessed how the meat donations fed people who fought hunger every day.

By 1991, the NRA had gotten behind the HFTH movement on the national level and was running the NRA HFTH Information Clearinghouse to help put hunters in touch with programs in their communities. As an NRA Life member, I was proud of the NRA’s efforts and, years later, I continue to enjoy donating meat and attending local HFTH fundraisers in my home state and in the areas where I hunt. To date, one of the most prominent state-run HFTH programs to emerge is VHWC, which continues to receive grant funding from The NRA Foundation and other organizations that support its mission.

Important to note, while helping to feed people, VHWC — and every other state-based HFTH program in the country — helps to address other important issues. HFTH encourages hunters to harvest additional deer to help manage thriving deer herds by helping to reduce overall deer numbers statewide. It also enhances public safety on highways and near airports while helping to reduce crop and other damage caused by deer overpopulation. And finally, HFTH helps to promote the hunting heritage in a positive manner while demonstrating the respect and care we hunters show all across our country. State-based HFTH programs are non-profit feeding programs that promote both the tradition of hunting and the tradition of caring — hallmarks of the American sportsman.

va nters for the hungry

Making a Difference
“We are so very blessed to live in this great nation of America, where no child should lay his or her head down at night and feel hunger,” said Arrington, leading into the start of the event’s live fundraising auction. “Please help us to meet our needs so we can meet the needs of those less fortunate all across Virginia. You can make a difference, touch the life of a stranger.”

And that is what the crowd did. As mentioned earlier, the live and silent auctions from this one event raised $17,684.89 for VHWC, with items including hunting and kayak float trips as well as firearms, hunting equipment, jewelry, Washington Nationals baseball tickets and a hand-crafted, hand-painted wooden U.S. flag. It was fun to bid on things and, on a couple of occasions, to win the prize, knowing every dollar raised made a difference.

About the Author: NRA Life member, award-winning outdoor TV host and recreational real estate associate broker Phil Phillips of Hayden Outdoors has hunted five continents, taking more than 200 big-game animals and nearly 60 species worldwide. Prior to hosting hunting programs, he started Colorado’s first Ranching for Wildlife Program for antelope, which he ran for 15 years. Working alongside professional land managers to restore and protect habitat, Phil went on to guide clients to 500-plus big-game animals that have qualified for the record book. In 1992 Safari Club International honored him as the North American Bowhunting Outfitter of the Year. Email Phil at phil@haydenoutdoors.com.

Follow NRA Hunters’ Leadershipship Forum on Twitter @HuntersLead.

Washington: New Lead Regulations Would Target Shooting Ranges

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Stricter regulations could mean great expense for shooting ranges and retailers. We’ll keep up with this one, but here’s where it starts… READ MORE

lead on ranges

SOURCE: NRA-ILA

The Washington Department of Labor and Industries Division of Occupational Safety & Health (DOSH) has released an updated draft of the lead rules they originally released last year following stakeholder meetings. These proposed regulations will impose complicated and expensive burdens on shooting ranges and retailers, potentially making it difficult for some to continue operations. DOSH will be holding additional stakeholder meetings to discuss these proposed regulations. Shooting ranges are vital to the safe practice and exercise of our constitutionally protected Second Amendment right to self-defense, and maintaining access to shooting ranges is a top priority for NRA.

Existing federal and state law already provides extensive regulation of lead in the workplace. In addition to the federal requirements under the Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Washington also has regulations in place regarding workplace lead exposure and has enforced these regulations through inspections and citations. This draft regulation proposes new and much more demanding requirements that significantly exceed compliance under existing law without providing any clarification on their need. Furthermore, there have been no economic impact studies on the effect these regulations will have on small businesses.

Your NRA will continue to actively participate as a stakeholder in the development of these new rules in meetings with the Department of Labor and Industries. We will provide ongoing input on the impact the proposal will have on gun ranges, retailers, and our shooting community.

 

TWRA Annual Elk Hunt Raffle is Back and Bigger!

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by Richard Logsdon

Following an incredibly successful effort last year, an elk tag for the 2019 Tennessee elk hunt will be available again this year through a raffle to be held by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Foundation (TWRF). Last year the effort raised more than $220,000 for the Tennessee elk management program. Previously, when the tag was sold at auction, the most ever raised was $17,000.

This year a single ticket costs $20. Three tickets are available for $50, and 10 can be purchased for $100 and are on sale now until August 2. There is no limit to the number of raffle tickets that can be purchased.

The grand prize winner will have the opportunity to participate in the October 2019 rifle elk hunt in the premier Elk Hunting Zone within North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area. In addition to the elk tag, the grand prize winner will also receive a Best of the West Mountain Scout Rifle, with a Huskermaw Blue Diamond long range scope, and the option to have it filmed for an episode of The Best of the West Outdoor television series.

In addition to the grand prize, the TWRF has secured four other prize packages. A complete list of the prizes can be found at www.twrf.net.

Since the elk hunt was implemented in 2009, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has donated a permit to a Non-Governmental Organization to join other participants who will be chosen from a computer drawing.

“The Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission’s decision to offer an additional conservation tag is an innovative way to raise additional funding for habitat management and restoration,” said Joey Woodard, TWRF executive director. “We are proud to support the TWRA in this effort, and we have partnered with leaders in the outdoors industry to help us grow this initiative.”

Raffle tickets may be purchased online directly from the TWRF website.

2019 Tennessee Elk Tag Raffle

A Chance to Hunt Elk in Tennessee and Win Great Prizes.

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Grand Prize

The Grand Prize winner will have the opportunity to participate in the fall 2019 rifle elk hunt on North Cumberland WMA in the premier Elk Hunting Zone 1. The Grand Prize winner will also receive The Best of the West Mountain Scout Rifle in 6.5 PRC topped with a Huskemaw 4-16×42 Blue Diamond long range scope. (Valued at $8,900) But that’s not all, the winner can have their elk hunt filmed for an episode of The Best of the West outdoor television series.


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2nd Prize

A 2019 Polaris Ranger 570 in Pursuit Camo. The RANGER® 570 delivers the best-in-class 2-person utility side-by-side performance with 44 HP and True On-Demand All Wheel Drive. This workhorse is equipped with the features you need to get the job done, and the comfort you want for a day on the trails or around the property. (Valued at $10,200)


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3rd Prize

$2,500.00 Bass Pro Shops/Cabela’s Gift Card. Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s offers the most comprehensive selection of Fishing, Hunting, Camping, Boating, and Outdoor Gear, that you will find anywhere. The Gift Card can be redeemed for online purchases, catalog orders, and purchases made at Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s retail stores.


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4th Prize

Knight .50 Caliber Mountaineer Muzzleloader. The Mountaineer features a 27” fluted solid 416 stainless steel match grade Green Mountain barrel with a laminated straight stock finished in nutmeg. This beautiful muzzleloader is claimed by many to be the most reliable and accurate muzzle loader on the market today, guaranteed MOA to 200 yards. (Valued at $1,125)


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5th Prize

Hunters Gear Package.
Grizzly 40 Quart Cooler.
• Pack Rabbit E.T.H. Chest Vest.
• Pack Rabbit BCH60 Versatile Pack System.
• ESEE JG5 Fixed Blade Knife.
• LaCrosse Footwear Gift Certificate for any pair of LaCrosse boots.
(Package valued at $1,100)

The deadline for purchasing tickets is Friday, August 2 at 11:59 p.m. (CDT). The electronic drawing will be held Aug. 5 and the winners will be announced at the commission’s Aug. 16 meeting.

“The results from last year’s raffle generated $224,840 in revenue and there was only one lucky winner,” said Woodard. “Although there’s still only one elk tag up for grabs, participants will have five chances to win valuable prizes this year and that should generate even more ticket sales to support conservation.”

TWRF is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting habitat conservation, responsible land stewardship, and Tennessee’s hunting and fishing heritage for the benefit of TWRA and Tennessee’s outdoor enthusiasts.

New Federal Law Will Promote Target Range Development on Public Lands

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Some good news! The Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Ac amended the P-R Act to provide states greater opportunities to use the P-R funds apportioned to them for public range development.

hunter safety

SOURCE: NRA-ILA

On May 10, President Trump signed the Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act into law. This NRA-backed law will help promote firearm safety and training and enjoyment of the shooting sports by freeing up more federal funds for use in public shooting range development and construction.

Beginning in 1937 with the passage of the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act — commonly known as the Pittman-Robertson Act (P-R Act) — federal excise taxes on firearms, ammunition, and archery equipment have been returned to the states to help promote wildlife conservation and restoration. Participating states must ensure that hunting license fees are used exclusively for the administration of the state’s fish and game department.

Fifty percent of the excise tax revenue from handguns, bows, and arrows may be used for hunter education programs and the development and operation of archery and firearm shooting ranges. Additionally, there is an $8 million annual set-aside for firearm and bow hunter education and safety program grants within the states, which can also help fund ranges.

The P-R Act has been critical in preserving America’s hunting and sport-shooting heritage. State wildlife management programs have brought back species that in the early 1900s were in severe decline or on the brink of extinction, including white tailed deer, wild turkey, and wood ducks. Managed hunting, of course, plays a critical role in this responsible stewardship.

The Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act (S. 94/H.R. 1222) amended the P-R Act to provide states greater opportunities to use the P-R funds apportioned to them for public range development.

First, the Act reduces the states’ mandatory matching share for a range development project from 25% to 10% (a state, in other words, only needs to provide 10% of the funding, while P-R funds can provide up to 90%).

It also extends the time a state has to obligate and expend the funds for range development from two fiscal years to five fiscal years.

Finally, the Act provides a new revenue stream for funding range development. It will allow up to 10% of specified apportionments from the wildlife restoration account to be used for this purpose. These funds were formerly unavailable for range construction, maintenance, or expansion projects.

We encourage states to take full advantage of the increased opportunities this new law will provide for them to build or expand safe, convenient, and modern accommodations for residents and visitors to responsibly exercise their Second Amendment rights.

 

ESPN Sportscaster Attacks Sportsman

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ESPN’s Keith Olbermann attacks a young Mississippi hunter for harvesting a turkey in turkey season. READ IT ALL

white turkey terror

SOURCE: NRA-ILA

Perhaps jealous of all of the negative coverage his MSNBC protégé has received in recent days, last week ESPN host Keith Olbermann launched an unhinged Twitter attack against a Mississippi turkey hunter that earned the political commentator widespread scorn.

The target of Olbermann’s ire was 22-year-old outdoorsman Hunter Waltman. A turkey hunter, Waltman was the subject of a piece in Jackson, Mississippi’s Clarion Ledger. The article chronicled how Waltman lawfully harvested a rare white wild turkey. Olbermann also took issue with the newspaper’s outdoors writer Brian Broom for reporting on Waltman’s accomplishment.

On March 26, Olbermann tweeted out a link to the Clarion Ledger story and mocked Waltman, commenting “It be rare and beautiful so me should kill it.” Olbermann went on to state, “This pea-brained scumbag identifies himself as Hunter Waltman and we should do our best to make the rest of his life a living hell. And the nitwit clown who wrote this fawning piece should be fired.”

Olbermann doesn’t appear to have a general problem with harvesting turkeys for human consumption, reserving his scorn only for those who do so in the most ethical manner. Some astute observers pointed out that in the 1990s Olbermann served as a commercial spokesman for fast food chain Boston Market. In one television spot, the self-appointed gobbler guardian can be seen hawking a “$4 turkey melt BLT combo.”

In a follow-up article about Olbermann’s belligerent comments, Waltman noted that as a result of the ESPN host’s actions he had been on the receiving end of online harassment. Waltman told the Clarion Ledger, “They text me all kinds of stuff. If he (Olbermann) hadn’t done that, none of this would have happened.” The young hunter added, “To tell you the truth, it seemed like a threat to me…Make (my) life ‘a living hell?’ That seems like a threat to me.”

In addressing the matter, Bloom’s editor at the Clarion ledger showed support for both his writer and Waltman. With an obvious sarcasm, Clarion-Ledger’s Executive Editor Sam R. Hall tweeted, “@KeithOlbermann says @BrianBroom should be fired for writing this story. What was I thinking? I guess I should have fired our outdoors writer for writing about a hunter killing an unusual turkey during turkey hunting season.” Hall went on to note, “Keith Olbermann‘s tweet was recklessly irresponsible. Someone with his following needs to understand the possible impact of his words. Telling over 1 million people to make someone’s life a living hell could have seriously dangerous consequences,” adding, “In our newsroom, that would be a fireable offense, not writing a story about a hunter bagging a turkey.”

After receiving significant criticism for his remarks about Waltman, Olbermann apologized to the hunter on Twitter. On March 27, Olbermann wrote, “I am an opponent of trophy hunting and remain so, but nobody should feel threatened. This was anything but my intent, so I unreservedly apologize to Mr. Waltman for this tweet.” Given that Olbermann explicitly called on his followers “to make the rest of [Waltman’s] life a living hell,” readers will have to judge for themselves the sincerity of the ESPN host’s apology. ESPN responded to the controversy with a statement that said, “We have spoken to him about not making personal attacks.”

Having to address the outlandish political statements of its on air personalities is a recurring problem for ESPN. In late 2017, the network’s ombudsman admitted that the purported sports station was “awash in rising political tide.” Amidst slumping ratings, in early 2018 the network promised to return its flagship SportsCenter program “to its roots as a hub of news and highlights” rather than political commentary. Olbermann is a current host of SportsCenter.

Olbermann’s latest outburst will cause some to question the network’s commitment to this return to form. It is anyone’s guess as to whether whatever internal action ESPN might have taken will be enough to prevent Olbermann from indulging his bizarre prejudices in the future.

VIDEO: Shooting With Leupold’s Custom Dial System

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Leupold’s CDS gives shooters the opportunity to get a truly custom scope. Read about and it and check out the VIDEO. MORE

leupold cds

SOURCE: Leupold

The Leupold Custom Dial System (CDS) provides a simple way to compensate for ballistic performance customized for your rifle and load.

Each CDS is unique, taking all practical ballistic and environmental factors into account. It’s laser-inscribed just for you! Once the CDS elevation dial is installed, just range the target, dial to the correct position, aim dead-on, and hit the target.

CDS takes into account all of the following:
Cartridge & Caliber
Bullet Weight
Bullet Make/Brand
Bullet Type
Ballistic Coefficient
Muzzle Velocity
Average Elevation
Average Temperature
Sight Height
Zero Distance

The CDS System works by laser-inscribing your scope’s elevation dial to match your load, velocity, and conditions based on the information you provide. Your CDS-equipped scope will be in perfect sync with the way your rifle and load shoots (handloads included).

Check out this video by Leupold with Fred Eichler and Leupold’s Tim Lesser.

It’s amazing! WATCH IT HERE

Check out more amazing Leupold Products Here!

Time’s Running Out to Win This TN Elk Tag!

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Still looking for your trophy of a lifetime?

Bag a Big Tennessee Elk
Bag a Big Tennessee Elk!

The hunt dates are October 13-19, 2018. If the hunter has not been successful in Zone 1 after 7 days, then all the zones will be available for an additional 7 days. EHZ 1 is a 6,827 acre zone that has been hunted since 2009. The zone was rested during the 2015 and 2016 seasons. The zone has a very high success rate and contains multiple wildlife openings.

Bass Pro Shops will sweeten the deal even further by outfitting the winner with a brand new Tikka T3X Lite Stainless bolt-action rifle in 7mm Rem Mag topped with an Oculus Pro Team HD 3x9x40mm rifle scope.

Oculus Pro
Oculus Pro Team HD 3x9x40mm rifle scope
Tikka T3X Lite
Tikka T3X Lite Stainless bolt-action rifle in 7mm Rem. Mag

The raffle winner will be announced at the TFWC August 23-24 meeting.

10 raffle tickets are still available but only through midnight, August 15, 2018.

One lucky winner will be selected to participate in the fall 2018 rifle elk hunt on North Cumberland WMA in the premier Elk Hunting Zone 1.

The hunt dates are October 13-19, 2018. If the hunter has not been successful in Zone 1 after 7 days, then all the zones will be available for an additional 7 days. 

EHZ 1 is a 6,827 acre zone that has been hunted since 2009. The zone was rested during the 2015 and 2016 seasons. The zone has a very high success rate and contains multiple wildlife openings.

The winner will also be outfitted with a brand new Tikka T3X Lite Stainless bolt-action rifle in 7mm Rem. Mag topped with an Oculus Pro Team HD 3x9x40mm rifle scope.

For only $10 per ticket you get a chance at a once-in-a-lifetime hunting opportunity and a prize package valued at more than $1,000. There is no limit on the number of raffle tickets a customer can purchase. Take your best shot at a Tennessee trophy elk and enter today! Raffle and hunt details can be found by visiting the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Foundation site.

Tennessee state law requires that you must be at least 18 years old to enter. You need not be present to win. The winner must be a U.S. citizen eligible to legally own a firearm according to federal law. The winner is responsible for all taxes and fees associated with the prize, and must possess the required licenses and permits to participate in the hunt.

Connie King, District 6 Commissioner for TWRA recently stated, “This is the first year for the elk raffle. Previously it had been a draw for a few very lucky people then an auction for one tag. With the raffle,  all participants are winners to some extent since each raffle dollar will contribute to the success of the elk program here in Tn.”

To purchase your ticket, head over to the Foundation’s website https://www.twrf.net/store/2018-elk-tag-raffle or the TWRA website https://gooutdoorstennessee.com The cost is $10 per ticket and there is no limit on how many a customer may purchase (handling fee may apply).