Category Archives: Hunting

SKILLS: Riflescopes: All About Reticles

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This is the second in a series on optic basics, and it covers the most visible component of a scope: the reticle. Read on…

by NRA Staff

basic riflescope reticle

The riflescope’s reticle is the visible reference used as an aiming point to align the gun with the target. There are many reticle patterns ranging from simple to complex. The most popular remains the general-purpose crosshair. However, even the simple crosshair offers choices, such as tapered, ultra thin, duplex, mil-dot, ballistic compensating, range-finding, center dot, center ring and post, just to name a few. Each configuration is intended for a specific type of use and there are multiple versions of all. For example, tapered crosshairs are a popular choice for varmint hunting and duplex crosshairs are a common choice for big-game hunting. There seems to be no limit to the new reticle designs being offered, and most makers offer at least six or more types. Your best bet is to try out several at a local gun store, then consult with experienced shooters or hunters before making a final selection.

Reticles may be illuminated electronically, with tritium or with fiber optics to enhance their contrast against dark backgrounds; this is helpful especially at dusk or dawn or during heavy overcast conditions. Illumination remains an expensive option that may not work well in very cold conditions and has limited usefulness. Still, it has proven a popular addition to many scopes.

reticle choices

The reticle itself may be located inside the scope at the first, or front, focal plane or the second, or rear focal plane. The location is an issue only in variable-power scopes. Reticles located in the first focal plane in a variable-power scope will increase or decrease in size as the magnification is changed while those located in the second focal plane do not change size when the power is adjusted. For this reason, the latter location has become the most popular.

One situation in which a front-focal-plane reticle is clearly advantageous is in scopes with a mil-dot ranging system. This type of reticle employs dots spaced one milliradian apart on the crosshair. (A milliradian is the angle subtended by 3 feet at 1,000 yards.) An object of known size is bracketed between the dots, and a table is used to determine the range based on the number of dots the object measures. With a rear-focal-plane reticle variable, the mil-dot system is only accurate at one power setting. A front-focal-plane location maintains the same relationship to the target throughout the range of magnification, thus enabling mil-dots to be used accurately at any power.

A second benefit of placement in front of the variable-magnification lens system is that the reticle remains unaffected by tolerances or misalignment of the erector tube during power changes. With a rear-focal-plane location, these tolerances may shift point of impact as the power level changes.

In the past, many scope reticles were not constantly centered, meaning they moved off to the side when windage or elevation adjustments were made. Many shooters found this annoying. Today, nearly all riflescopes have constantly centered reticles that do not change position when adjustments are made.

Crosshairs or other reticle patterns are created by laser etching on optical glass or by ultra-thin platinum wires. Some early scope reticles used strands of hair, hence the name “crosshairs.” Others used spider silk…interestingly enough, the silk of the black widow spider, which has a better tensile strength than other types of spider silk.

David Tubb DTR Reticle
David Tubb’s DTR design takes a reticle about as far as it can go, offering built-in aiming dot compensation choices to even account for density altitude.

SKILLS: Optics ABCs: What All Those Terms Mean

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When it comes to optics for firearms, the specific terms that people use to describe them can be confusing. Here’s what all that argot actually means…in alphabetical order, no less.

Source: NRAFamily.org

rifleman with scope

Contrast
The ability of an optical system to distinguish clearly and crisply between areas of light and dark is called contrast. For shooting purposes, always select the riflescope with the highest contrast.

Exit Pupil
Exit pupil is the diameter, in millimeters, of the beam of focused light transmitted by the ocular lens. The exit pupil can be calculated by dividing the diameter of the objective lens by the power, or magnification, of the scope. An exit pupil of about 5mm or larger in diameter is preferable. A large exit pupil provides a brighter image with greater contrast and a wide field of view for easy target acquisition. Exit pupils smaller than 5mm in diameter offer darker images with lower contrast and progressively narrower fields of view.

Eye Relief
Eye relief is the distance of the eye from the ocular lens when the image fully fills the lens and is not vignetted. Normally, eye relief figures are given as a distance range, for example 3.2 to 3.8 inches, due to differences in individual visual acuity. On a variable-power scope, eye relief typically changes with scope power. Too little eye relief is undesirable, particularly on a scope mounted on a hard-kicking magnum rifle, where it may contribute to a “scope bite” on the eyebrow. For this reason, most centerfire riflescopes have a minimum eye relief of 3 to 4 inches. A riflescope with an eye relief of less than 3 inches should only be used on a small-caliber rifle with low recoil.

Most riflescopes and shotgun scopes are designed to be mounted on the receiver, close to the eye, and thus have relatively short eye relief. Scopes to be mounted on handguns and on the barrels of long guns are classed as long eye relief (LER) or extended eye relief (EER) scopes. Some models provide as much as 18 to 20 inches of eye relief, enabling scope use on a handgun extended at arm’s length. Other models may offer an eye relief of 12 inches or less for scope mounting on a scout rifle. Note that the higher the magnification, the shorter the eye relief of such scopes.

Field of View
Field of view is the width of the area that can be seen in the image at a given distance. Normally, field of view is expressed as the number of feet in the image at 1,000 yards, for example 322 feet at 1,000 yards. Field of view decreases dramatically with increasing magnification. A narrow field of view makes it difficult to find the target and then to hold it in the image. For this reason, a wide field of view may be more important than high scope magnification.

When looking through a scope with a 100-foot field of view at 1,000 yards, a 100-foot-wide object viewed at that distance will just fill the visual field.

Focal Plane
The focal plane is the plane or distance from the objective lens at which light rays from an object converge to form a focused image inside the main tube. Objects in the same focal plane appear to the eye to be at the same distance, and therefore can be seen with equal clarity without the need to refocus the eye. One of the advantages of optical sights is that the target and the reticle are in the same focal plane. This eliminates trying to focus on both iron sights and the target at the same time. This is why riflescopes are so popular with shooters who have less-than-perfect eyesight.

There are two focal planes in a typical riflescope: The first behind the objective lens, and the second behind the erector lens set.

See the huge selection of riflescopes available here at Midsouth HERE

REVIEW: 5 Best Budget Bolt-Action Rifles

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Being on a tight budget doesn’t mean having to settle for poor performance in a bolt-action rifle. Here are 5 choices all under $400 that you really can’t go wrong with…

Ruger American
Ruger American

By Jeff Johnston, NRA Publications

I can’t say I really I love the current trend to build rifles as inexpensively as possible; I tend to like finer rifles with walnut or carbon-fiber reinforced stocks. But the trend is here, and it’s tough to put that cat back in the bag. Once Remington introduced its Model 710 and later its 770 that sold for around $300 in 2007, the floodgates opened. Now nearly every major manufacturer builds an economy gun to compete in this market rather than conceding it to the competition. The guns are cheap to the touch, hard on the eyes, and their actions aren’t always smooth. But, as much as I hate to like these guns, there is something amazing about them: They shoot. So, considering that a new smart phone that will last you two years or until it gets wet now costs $600, any one of these rifles should last generations — all for under 400 bucks. Here are five.

ONE: Of all the rifles in this roundup, Savage’s Axis might be the least likely to win a beauty contest. But if there’s one thing the company does well, it’s making homely rifles that shoot well. One reason for this was due to the company’s game-changing barrel nut system that allows the manufacturer to adjust the chamber for headspace (the tightness of the bullet as it sits in the chamber), something that adds to accuracy in an economically friendly way. Then its adjustable AccuTrigger revolutionized the rifle world as we know it. But then, feeling the market pressure from Remington’s new line of inexpensive rifles, Savage dropped its price even lower with its Axis line. It still features the barrel nut system and AccuTrigger, but it’s placed in a less expensive stock. Other than features that all rifles come with these days, like pre-drilled holes for a scope, a buttpad and sling swivels, it features a detachable magazine, a 22-inch barrel and 6.5 pounds of “great personality” that will punch three rounds into a group just over an inch — maybe better. It comes in eight popular calibers and the excellent 6.5 Creedmoor. I found it online for $368. savagearms.com

TWO: Ruger entered the inexpensive gun market with its American rifle line, which is very similar in design as the others with its injection-molded plastic stock that sports integrally molded bedding pillars. Its Predator model comes in varmint rounds, but also the 6.5 Creedmoor and .308 Win., so it can also be an excellent deer and do-it-all gun. It has a great adjustable trigger. Its rotary, flush-fitting magazine is a Ruger hallmark, but this rifle also comes with a couple features not seen on most rifles of this price class, including a threaded barrel for a suppressor and a Picatinny rail for easy scope mounting. I shot this rifle extensively out to 600 yards, and was amazed at what it can do, all for under $399. Ruger.com

THREE: Debuting in 2013, Remington’s 783 represents a vast upgrade over its bare-bones 710 and later 770 rifles. Compared to these, some might even say it looks good with its modernized lines. It has several features that are legit, including an upgraded metal magazine and latch (polymer magazines are one thing, but I can’t stand plastic latches), Savage-style barrel nut, an adjustable trigger and a pillar bedding system that free-floats its button-rifled barrel. One thing I don’t like is its small ejection port that makes clearing jams and feeding individual rounds into the chamber difficult. The design does, however, likely add to the action’s rigidity and therefore to its accuracy. While it’s not as smooth as a 700, the 783 is a great rifle for the money, especially considering it comes with a scope, albeit a cheap one, all for $399. remington.com

FOUR: Of all the rifles here, the Mossberg Patriot Kryptek Highlander pleases my eye the most, what with its Kryptek camo pattern, straight-line stock design and spiral-fluted bolt. But more important than its looks, the 7-pound rifle also shoots thanks to a 22-inch button-rifled barrel and adjustable trigger that goes all the way down to 2 pounds. A couple of little things give this gun a more expensive feel, like its barrel’s recessed crown that protects it from dings, and its knurled bolt handle that probably adds more class than grip for which it’s intended. All in all, this is a lot of rifle for the money. Choose an all-around caliber, and this could be the one rifle that you’re neither afraid to show off around the campfire, nor beat around in your truck. I found it online for $399. mossberg.com

FIVE: Thompson/Center (TC) entered the bolt-action business about a decade ago, and now it’s delving into the economy rifle game with its Compass model. In my experience, TC rifles shoot great thanks to their quality barrels and proprietary 5R rifling. Like the other guns here, the Compass depends on a molded plastic stock to cut much of its cost — so don’t expect any Kevlar or hardwood. I like this rifle’s three-position safety, tactical-looking bolt handle, excellent TC action and its 22-inch barrel that’s threaded for a silencer. Like its competition, it has an adjustable trigger, and I wouldn’t buy a rifle today without one. I can overlook its plastic magazine knowing that this is a wonderful rifle for an incredible price. $399 tcarms.com

3 Easy Dry-Fire Drills for Handgunners

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Don’t let bad weather stop you from improving handgun skills: it’s fast, safe, and easy using these tips from Team Springfield. Learn about them…

Courtesy Team Springfield

Team SpringfieldDo harsh winter conditions or a full schedule keep you from getting to the shooting range as often as you’d prefer? For us too, but that shouldn’t mean you can’t get in a little practicing. Dry fire practice can be an important (and better yet, inexpensive) part of your training. And it’s convenient because you can do it in the comfort of your own home.

As always, unload the firearm (check and double check to ensure it’s unloaded) and remove all ammo and distractions from the room. Close your curtains, and get to work! It’s easy and useful to log some practice reps by dry firing.

Here are a few drills to get you started.

DRAWING FROM CONCEALMENT
Dry fire drawing from concealment is particularly valuable obviously for people who carry concealed. Quickly and safely drawing your pistol from underneath a shirt, coat or other layers can be more difficult than you might think. Unpracticed, there’s significant potential for snags and fumbling.

Dry fire practicing can help you from coming up short like Fredo in The Godfather.

TRIGGER CONTROL
Don’t move the gun when you pull the trigger! Regardless of the speed you are moving your trigger finger, you need to avoid dipping/moving the muzzle.

How can you tell if you’re falling victim to this bad habit? Set the trigger on your unloaded pistol by racking the slide. Next, place an empty casing on its base on the top of the slide, just behind the front sight. Now, press the trigger without causing the case to fall off.

The speed in which you can do this will be a limiting factor in how quickly you can shoot accurately.

If the case doesn’t fall off, congrats! You’ve pulled the trigger correctly.

Rob Leatham
“The trick is one of visual focus. Try to see a full sight picture (front AND rear sights AND target) before you pull the trigger. Not just the target or the front sight. It’s hard to do quickly and one of the skills all great speed shooters have mastered.” — Rob Leatham, Team Springfield

TARGET TRANSITIONS
Another tricky skill is rapidly and precisely transitioning from one target to the next – especially when dealing with recoil during live fire. Since this is dry firing, though, we’ll have to do without the effect of recoil. Pick out three objects or other visual cues (targets), and practice transitioning the gun from one target to the next.

PUT IT ALL TOGETHER
Once you’ve practiced the above three techniques individually and have seen some improvement, practice them together. Again, with an unloaded gun, set the trigger, safe the gun (if applicable) and holster.

Start by drawing from a concealed position, acquire a target, align the sights and THEN perform a smooth trigger pull on each target (yeah, we know the hammer/striker only moves the first time, but go through the motion anyway). Gradually build speed on the gun movements and the trigger pull. Hopefully, the next time you’re able to get to the range for live fire, you will be able to shoot multiple targets faster and more accurately.

Trump Touts Suppressors as ‘Safety Equipment’ for Gun Owners

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As Texas & U.S. Law Shield have previously reported, advocates of hearing protection want to pursue new legislation to make suppressors easier to buy, and a key backer is Donald Trump, Jr.

“It’s about safety,” Trump Jr. explains in the video interview above recorded last September with the founder of SilencerCo Joshua Waldron. “It’s a health issue, frankly.”

“Anyone who has ever worried about hearing loss from shooting might want to lend their ears to this cause!” said  Emily Taylor, an attorney at the Houston law firm of Walker & Byington.

Now the issue is advancing on several fronts.

On January 9, 2017, Congressman Jeff Duncan (R-SC), co-chair of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus (CSC), introduced H.R. 367 to remove suppressors from the National Firearms Act control and treat them the same as long guns, replacing the outdated federal transfer process with an instantaneous NICS background check.

The measure picked up 42 Republican co-sponsors, including fellow CSC member Congressman John Carter (R-TX), and one Democrat co-sponsor, CSC Co-Chair Gene Green (D-TX). The measure was immediately referred to the House Ways and Means Committee and the House Judiciary Committee.

The bill, whose official title is “To provide that silencers be treated the same as long guns,” takes a public-health angle to safeguard the hearing of the nation’s 55 million gun owners.

Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) introducted the similar Hearing Protection Act of 2017 (S. 59) in the Senate.

“This legislation will enable gun owners to have better access to hearing protection products and improve safety for the shooting sports by removing extensive wait times for burdensome paperwork processing that does not advance public safety,” said Lawrence Keane, NSSF senior vice president and general counsel. “NSSF is appreciative of Sen. Crapo’s leadership on this firearms safety issue and his willingness to stand alongside lawful American gun owners, hunters, and shooting sports enthusiasts.”

An earlier measure with the same goal is H.R. 3799, known more widely as the Hearing Protection Act of 2015.

About all the bills, Taylor explained, “Currently, the manufacture, purchase, and possession of firearm silencers are regulated by the ATF and must comply with the requirements laid out in the National Firearms Act. Similar to a short-barreled rifle or shotgun, anyone who wants a firearm suppressor must first get approval from the ATF and pay the required tax. An extended waiting period comes along with the time it takes the ATF to process these requests.”

“The Hearing Protection Act seeks to amend the law so that firearm silencers are treated the same way as long guns,” Taylor added. “The bill would make it so that there is no longer a tax associated with the transfer of a firearm silencer, and anyone who pays a tax on a silencer after October 22, 2015 could receive a refund of such tax.

“Additionally, anyone who possessed a firearm silencer would be treated as meeting any registration and licensing requirements of the NFA. Lastly, the bill would preempt certain state laws that tried to impose taxes or registration requirements on firearm silencers.”

Ashley Hlebinsky Wins Grits Gresham Award

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Ashley Hlebinsky, curator for the Cody Firearms Museum of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, has been awarded the annual Grits Gresham Shooting Sports Communicator Award for 2017 by the Professional Outdoor Media Association’s (POMA) and the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s (NSSF) .

Hlebinsky accepted the award at the SHOT  Show 2017 State of the Industry Dinner.

This prestigious honor recognizes extraordinary achievements in communications in the areas of responsible firearms use, hunting, and the shooting sports.

Kevin L Orthman, Executive Director of POMA said, “The entire POMA organization is excited to honor Ashley for her contribution as a firearms communicator, historian, and expert analyst in the media. She also will proudly add her own piece of history as the first female to receive this prestigious award. The Grits Gresham Award is one of the highest awards POMA gives out each year, and Ashley is a great example of someone who has spent her career changing the face of firearms in the media, and preserving the history and legacies of some of the greatest firearms in the world.”

POMA and the NSSF developed the Grits Gresham Shooting Sports Communicator Award in 2005, when NSSF honored Gresham with a lifetime achievement award.

The award recognizes communicators within the firearms arena who grasp the ideals, foster the commitment, and display the talent Grits Gresham exhibited during his storied career.

“From Ashley’s first stint as a Research Fellow here at the Center of the West, we knew we had the ideal representative for our Cody Firearms Museum,” Bruce Eldredge, the Center’s Executive Director and CEO explained. “Now, as curator, her knowledge of firearms and the firearms industry is extraordinary, as well as her command of the delicate issues surrounding firearms use in our country. Ashley continues to foster relationships throughout the museum world, the Cody area, and the firearms industry. We heartily congratulate Ashley on this award and the POMA for recognizing her remarkable contribution.”

She also is a freelance writer and has appeared on both national and international television networks.

For more on the Cody Firearms Museum of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, click here!

Top 5 New Rifles at SHOT Show 2017

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Tale of the Tape

By Richard Mann:
Though the 6.5 Creedmoor still gets a lot of attention, there’s a
whole lot more going on this year for hunters and target shooters.

The tale of the tape with regard to rifles in 2017 has more to do with a single cartridge. The 6.5 Creedmoor seems to have taken the rifle world by storm, and more and more rifles are now available for that cartridge. However, that’s not the only news. Although new MSRs do not dominate this year, a major manufacturer has entered that
playing field. You should find plenty new to like in the rifle world for 2017, with new rimfire offerings, new youth offerings, and plenty of threaded muzzles.

Barrett

barret lightweight rifle
➤ The Barrett Lightweight Rifle
is a bolt-action rifle designed to
be carried farther on long days in
the field and perform like a
Barrett at critical moments. The
stock is crafted from carbon fiber
to provide an ultralight yet stiff
platform. The actions are scaled
for their specific caliber, and precision
barrels are contoured for
their application. There’s nothing
one-size-fits-all about this rifle.
SRP: $1,799. Booth #11371.

CMMG

The CMMG MkW ANVIL XBE
➤ The MkW ANVIL XBE, an all-new mid-sized AR-rifle platform, is
chambered in .458 SOCOM. The most defining feature of the new
MkW ANVIL is that the rifle utilizes CMMG’s unique Powerbolt
design, which allows the rifle to use a modified AR10-sized bolt for
increased durability. The rifle is also built on an AR10-sized frame,
with the upper receiver shortened by ¾ inch to minimize weight and
increase ergonomics. It comes with a 1:14 twist 16-inch barrel, a billet upper and lower receiver, and a single-stage mil-spec trigger, and weighs 7.5 pounds. SRP: $1,849.95.

MARLIN

limited-edition 1894

For Marlin collectors, the limited-edition 1894 is sure to
be a hit. Available in .357, .44 Magnum, and .45 Colt, these
American-made rifles feature a straight-grip American black walnut
stock, a polished 20-inch octagonal barrel, and Marble sights.

For 2017, Marlin has announced the return of
one of its most popular rifles, the 1894
Cowboy. Available in .357, .44 Magnum, and .45
Colt, these 100 percent American-made rifles
feature a straight grip American black walnut
stock, a receiver and bolt machined from solid
steel, a polished 20-inch octagonal barrel, and
Marble sights. SRP: $1,041. The standard 1894
with a round barrel is also available for $789.
To further celebrate the reintroduction of
the 1894, Marlin is offering a limited-edition
version in .45 Colt with B-grade American
black walnut stock, highly polished metalwork,
and an engraved gold-inlaid receiver.
Only 1,500 rifles will be offered. SRP: $1,349.
Another lever-action that has been missing
from the Marlin line for some time is the 444.
Chambered for the .444 Marlin and built on
the 1895 action, this rifle has an American
black walnut pistol grip stock, 22-inch round
barrel, and Marble sights. SRP: $789. Booth
#14229. (marlinfirearms.com)

FN

FN M249S
➤ The FN M249S is a semi-auto version of the M249 SAW light
machine gun, which was originally developed by FN Herstal as the
FN MINIMI and adopted by the U.S. military in 1988. The rifle features the signature 18.5-inch FN cold-hammer-forged, chrome-lined barrel and operates from a closed-bolt position. Chambered in 5.56 NATO, the rifle will accept a magazine
or a linked ammunition belt and offers a 4- to 6.5-pound trigger.
The rifle weighs 16 pounds, is 40.7 inches long, and has an 18.5-
inch barrel. SRP: $8,799 to $9,499. The FN 15 DMR II has been
re-engineeredfor enhanced performance and features the all-new FN proprietary rail system with M-LOK, which provides extreme
rigidity and less deflection, ensuring that all mounted accessories remain affixed without shift. Like its predecessor, the rifle offers an 18-inch match-grade cold-hammer-forged barrel with a 1:7 twist, a Surefire Pro Comp muzzle device, and an upgraded mil-spec lower with a Timney trigger and Magpul MOE grip and buttstock. SRP: $1,999. The FN 15 Tactical Carbine chambered for the popular 300
AAC Blackout is duty-ready straight out of the box. Equipped with the new FN proprietary rail system, the carbine provides exceptional strength and durability, and offers a stronger, more rigid platform for accessories and optics. In addition, the FN 15 Tactical Carbine 300 BLK II, like its rifle and carbine siblings, features a 16-inch alloy steel cold-hammer-forged and chrome-lined barrel, a carbine-length gas system, a low-profile gas block, a Surefire  ProComp muzzle brake, and Magpul MOE furniture.
SRP: $1,599. Improving upon the existing platform with the addition of FN’s proprietary rail system, enhanced mil-spec lower receiver, and legendary match-grade free-floating chrome-lined, cold-hammer-forged barrel, the second-generation FN 15 Tactical Carbine offers extreme durability and performance. Features include the three-prong flash hider, the mid-length gas system, and the H1 buffer to decrease recoil. It’s fitted with a Magpul grip and buttstock and the M-LOK accessory-mounting system. SRP: $1,599. Booth #13662. (fnamerica.com)

Mossberg

mossberg mmr

➤ Mossberg has added two new MMRs to its line. The Tactical
Optics Ready MMR is offered with or without a Vortex
StrikeFire II red/green dot sight. This is an optics-ready AR15 that
is shipped without open sights. It has a six-position stock, a forward-assist M-Lok handguard, a 1:8 twist barrel, and the new Mossberg JM Pro drop-in 4-pound trigger. SRP: $1,253 to $1,399.

The other new MMR from Mossberg is the MMR PRO.
This rifle is similar to the optics-ready MMR but comes with an
18-inch, 1:8 twist 416 stainless barrel with a Silencerco ASR
muzzle brake. SRP: $1,393. Mossberg has several additions to the Patriot line. First is the Patriot Predator, which comes in a synthetic, flat dark earth stock with a 22-inch barrel and threaded muzzle. It is available in .223, .243, .308, and 6.5 Creedmoor. SRP: $441. Two additional Patriots are available in .223: the Patriot Synthetic and Super Bantam. Both retail for $396. For those who love the value and performance of the Mossberg Patriot but would like a  higher-end, dressed-up version, Mossberg is offering a Patriot Revere with high-grade walnut stock, rosewood grip and forend caps, and an upgraded blue finish. Finally, in addition to the Patriot
Predator, four more Patriots will now be chambered for the 6.5 Creedmoor. Booth #12734.

Stevens Offers Three New Affordable Shotgun Models

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Suffield, Connecticut-based Stevens has recently introduced three new shotgun products to its extensive line of affordable scatterguns: the semi-automatic 12-gauge S1200, the 12-Gauge Model 320 Waterfowl Camo Pump Shotgun, and 28-Gauge and 410-bore chamberings of its 555 over-under shotguns.

Stevens Shotguns Ad

The S1200 is the company’s first semi-automatic shotgun. It features an inertia-driven self-loading action with a walnut, camouflage synthetic, or all-weather matte black synthetic stock. The 6.6-pound S1200 has a 3-inch chamber, rotating bolt and is offered with a 26- or 28-inch vent-rib barrel that accepts the Beretta Mobilchoke system. Five versions, starting at $573 and ranging up to $685, will be offered.

The Mossy Oak Shadow Grass camo 320 series 12-gauge pump shotgun offers dual slide bars, a rotary bolt, synthetic stock, vent rib barrel and a five-round capacity. It features interchangeable chokes, green fiber optic front sight and is available in both standard length-of-pull and compact versions. Two models priced at $273 MSRP will be available.

The 555 has a scaled-to-gauge lightweight aluminum receiver. The receiver employs a steel insert that reinforces the breech to maximize strength while keeping weight down.

Standard features include a Turkish walnut stock and forend, shell extractors, a tang-mounted manual safety, a chrome-lined barrel, and a single, selective, mechanical trigger. The shotgun also includes 5 interchangeable choke tubes. Part No. 22166 is the 28 gauge model with a 3-inch chamber, MSRP $692; the 22166 is the .410 Bore, also with a 3-inch chamber, MSRP $692.

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Aoudad Adventure

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Hunting. It’s a tradition. It’s a challenge. It’s a way to provide. We don’t just understand this–we live it. Hunting is a part of our lives just as much as it is a part of yours.

During World War II, American soldiers stationed off the Barbary Coast of Northern Africa discovered a native sheep species, known as the aoudad. Recognizing their potential as a game animal, they shipped them to Texas; Aoudads quickly proved to be an extremely challenging hunt for multiple reasons. Their keen sense of smell, hearing, and alertness to danger, combined with their capability to retain water from sparse vegetation and survive long periods of time without it, gives them the ability to live in rugged, dry habitats that are often too harsh for other animals.

Recently, SilencerCo scouted the high desert terrain with UFC Featherweight Fighter Chad Mendes in search of this elusive creature. Equipped with silenced rifles and accompanied by expert guides, they set off to reconnect with the wilderness and harvest some challenging game. Click the link below to watch a 4-minute video about the hunt.

ABOUT CHAD MENDES

Mendes began wrestling at the age of five and continued the sport throughout high school and college until his competitive success led him to move to Sacramento and train with Team Alpha Male. Before turning pro, however, Mendes took home an impressive list of ranks and titles, including two-time PAC-10 Champ, and two-time D-I NCAA All-American.

Now, after less than three years of professional fighting, Mendes has also earned seven wins by way of knockout, two wins by submission, a record of 4-0 in WEC with wins over Javier Vazquez, Cub Swanson, Anthony Morrison, and Erik Koch, and he has won six of his last nine fights. Mendes most recently founded Finz and Featherz, a hunting and guide service.

Magnum Research Upgrades BFR Series

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Magnum Research (MRI) has updated its line of BFR (Big Frame Revolver) wheelguns.

All BFR special-ordered calibers, and all twelve BFR standard models with in .454 Casull, .44 Magnum, .30/30 Win, .45/70 Govt., .460 S&W, .500 S&W, and .45LC/.410, and with barrel lengths of 5 inches up to 10 inches will feature the new upgrades.

It all began in 1999, when an independent gunsmith/designer named Jim Tertin, was approached by MRI to manufacture the new large caliber revolver for them. Tertin mastered the base pin design, firing pin, barrels, frame and cylinder, and fine-tuned the timing of all BFR revolvers, and then put it into production for Magnum Research. In 2005, Tertin sold the BFR design to MRI and was hired by them as the Director of Manufacturing. His focus is now that of Director of Design, Research and Development for all MRI products including the iconic Desert Eagles and Baby Desert Eagles.
Among the changes:

The hammer spur is now taller and narrower than previous models. It was raised vertically, allowing for easier cocking. The new hammer is machined stainless steel and is made with extremely tight tolerances.

The BFR’s product line now employs a soft-rubber one-piece grip, with a taper suitable for single-action shooting. It is slightly longer than the original two-piece grip. The new Hogue grip is a brand new screwless design that has never before been offered on a single-action revolver. Each grip is shipped with an assembly/disassembly tool that aids in installing or removing the grip. The new grips and hammers will fit any BFR manufactured since 2000 and are available directly from Magnum Research.
The last new feature offered on the entire BFR product line is the new BFR logo. The logo was designed by Kevin Yoon, marketing manager for Kahr Firearms Group.