Category Archives: Rifles

Massachusetts AG Effectively, Unilaterally Bans AR-15s and State-Compliant Variants

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Maura Healey, attorney general of Massachusetts,
Maura Healey, attorney general of Massachusetts,

Maura Healey, the attorney general of Massachusetts, recently rewrote the state’s 1998 Gun Control Act to reinterpret what it had meant since 1998.

Writing in the Boston Globe, Healey outlined the changes:

— The Massachusetts assault weapons ban mirrors the federal ban Congress allowed to expire in 2004. It prohibits the sale of specific weapons like the Colt AR-15 and AK-47 and explicitly bans “copies or duplicates” of those products.

— “Copies or duplicates” mean “state compliant” versions of Modern Sporting Rifles sold in Massachusetts. Such “state compliant” versions lack a flash suppressor, a folding or telescoping stock, or other helpful shooter features. The AG will notify all gun manufacturers and dealers to make clear that the sale of semi-auto rifles with certain features is now illegal in Massachusetts.

— The effect could mean that all AR-15s that have been modified to comply with Massachusetts law are now illegal purely because they are AR-15s. This could eventually outlaw all semi-automatic weapons in the state, which should violate D.C. v Heller’s explicit “common use” standard.

— Healey said in her Globe article that “if a gun’s operating system is essentially the same as that of a banned weapon, or if the gun has components that are interchangeable with those of a banned weapon, it’s a ‘copy’ or ‘duplicate,’ and it is illegal.”

Bottom Line: Some of our customers in Middle America will notice this state-law change and not be too concerned about it, because it is Massachusetts, and things like this are to be expected there.

Quite a few of our customers and fellow countrymen in the Bay State are now in limbo because basic AR-15 parts may turn a vanilla semi-auto rifle into “copies or duplicates” of those products.

Will this turn into another nudge in the direction of our fellow Americans losing their rights? There seems to have been a precedent set with California cities banning firearms, the strict laws placed in Chicago (which seems to be working, he lied), and other “leaders” treating their constituents more like an authoritarian society.

Hopefully the people of Massachusetts sound off in a clear, unified, voice at the ballot box this November.

Semi-Auto AR-15 is a Weapon of War? Pish Posh

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The National Shooting Sports Foundation’s latest video has gone viral. It was made in response to anti-gun politicians, celebrities, and media elites’ repeated attempts to single out the AR-15 as a “weapon of war.”

Semi-automatic firearms, including the AR-15, account for approximately 70% of all firearms, and yet — in an attempt to literally give the AR-15 a bad name — we keep hearing the same rhetoric from anti-gun politicians, celebrities and the media elite. “Weapon of war” is their new catchphrase. Fact is, the AR-15 is a semi-automatic civilian rifle and not anything like a “weapon of war”.  Arm yourself with the facts at http://nssf.it/msrfacts.

 

Daniel Defense Releases ‘Ambush’ Hunting Rifle

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Daniel Defense Ambush 308 Win. in Kryptek Highlander came
Daniel Defense Ambush 308 Win. in Kryptek Highlander came

Daniel Defense has released a new 308 Winchester rifle designed specifically for North American hunters: The Daniel Defense Ambush 308 in Kryptek Highlander. MSRP: $2949.

At the rifle’s core is a free-floating, 18-inch cold hammer forged barrel, which comes standard with Daniel Defense’s Superior Suppression Device Extended, for reduced muzzle-flash. This barrel connects directly to the upper receiver and free-floating KeyMod handguard with a 4-Bolt Connection System and patent-pending barrel extension. DD claims this results in increased stability, better accuracy, and reduced weight.

The Ambush 308 is fed via a bolt carrier group featuring a redesigned geometry and a slick, low-friction coating that ensure smooth, reliable feeding under most any circumstances.

Ambidextrous controls make operating the rifle — including dropping the magazine, releasing the bolt, and switching the safety selector — intuitive and comfortable for right- and left-handed shooters. The charging handle is also ambidextrous, as well as user-configurable, and can be set up on either side with a larger or smaller handle to accommodate magnified optics or iron sights for a snag-free setup.

A 2-Stage Geissele Super Semi-Automatic (SSA) Trigger is the fire-control let-off. The configurable Daniel Defense Ambush 308 has an overall length between 35.375 inchest and 39 inches, depending on buttstock adjustment, and weighs 8.6 pounds empty. Its rail system features a 15-inch Picatinny top rail and KeyMods at the 3, 6, and 9 o’clock positions. The rifle is available in multiple colors and patterns, including Kryptek Highlander, with plans to offer it in Realtree Xtra pattern soon.

Daniel Defense is located in Black Creek, Georgia.

The AR-15: Americans’ Best Defense Against Terror and Crime?

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In this informative video, NRA News contributor Dom Raso, a former Navy SEAL and founder of Dynamis Alliance, reminds us that the AR-15 is the best defense against terror and crime — and he points out that banning AR-15s wouldn’t have prevented most of the recent terror attacks.

Raso also offers his common-sense solution to stemming the tide of terror: Law-abiding citizens prepared to deal with the imminent threats.

Raso highlight quote: “After the attack at Pulse night club in Orlando, Hillary Clinton looked past the obvious enemy — radical Islamic terror — and instead said ‘weapons of war have no place on our streets’ and that we need to ban AR-15s immediately. AR-15s are fine for Hillary and her family. They’ve been protected by armed guards who use them for three decades. But [for] average Americans who watch the news and feel genuine fear for their safety and their families’ safety — Hillary wants to deny them the level of protection she insists upon for herself.”

What did you think of Raso’s “Best Defense Against Terror” video?

Not Just for the ‘Jungle’: Inland’s New Carbine

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Inland Manufacturing recently released the American-made Jungle Carbine, which brings back the looks of the original 1944 and 1945 WWII combat carbine with some modern features. Continue reading Not Just for the ‘Jungle’: Inland’s New Carbine

The Ins and Outs of Metering Charges

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This is a specially-adapted excerpt from the forthcoming book, “Top Grade Ammo,” by author Glen Zediker, owner of Zediker Publishing. Click here to order from Midsouth.

by Glen Zediker

Most reloaders are going to invest in a powder meter. And, right off, it is a meter, not a “measure.” Meters don’t measure. My preference would be to most accurately call a “powder measure” a “dispenser.” That’s what it really does. The “measure” is comparing a meter hopper volume to a weight on a scale. This may seem tediously technical, but I think it’s important to really understand what we’re doing when we use a powder meter. It’s a volume, not a weight. The volume corresponds to a weight, that we arrived at through adjusting the meter volume.

Here’s a Culver. All Culver mechanisms are the same in that they have the same values; there can be differences from model to model in the steps between whole rotations, but each whole rotation is the same. It’s like comparing a ½-moa back sight to a ¼-moa back sight.
Here’s a Culver. All Culver mechanisms are the same in that they have the same values; there can be differences from model to model in the steps between whole rotations, but each whole rotation is the same. It’s like comparing a ½-moa back sight to a ¼-moa back sight.

If you plan on relying on a meter to throw charges, and not weigh each one, you best get a good meter. If the meter is only a starting point, where you are then going to use a powder trickler to top off a scale-weighed charge, meter quality is of no real concern. A powder trickler is a device that delivers propellant a kernel at a time.

So what’s a “good” meter? Good question. The very best have Culver dispensing mechanisms. Named for Benchrest pioneer Homer Culver, these precision-made mechanisms click, just like a back sight. Each click, of course, either expands or contracts a void that the propellant fills. The only Culver-equipped meters I know of are produced by smaller shops, and they are more costly. But unlike most of the major-player meter designs, a Culver setting cannot change. There are no set-screws or rotating micrometer stems or barrels. A lot of folks give advice to “check the meter each 10 throws….” Meaning, check to see if it’s still throwing the desired weight (by the way, that would be a pretty bad meter). My experience, which has come from a whopping lot of testing, showed me that my scale was going to change before a Culver would change.

The author is adamant about following this process to set a meter: Don’t throw and weigh single charges to adjust the meter. Throw and weigh 10-charge portions, with the scale set, of course, to 10-times the desired single-charge weight. The author does not recollect one time when the meter adjustment did not change following this process from what he first arrived at weighing single throws. Here’s how he sets it to adjust for a 24.0-grain throw.
The author is adamant about following this process to set a meter: Don’t throw and weigh single charges to adjust the meter. Throw and weigh 10-charge portions, with the scale set, of course, to 10-times the desired single-charge weight. The author does not recollect one time when the meter adjustment did not change following this process from what he first arrived at weighing single throws. Here’s how he sets it to adjust for a 24.0-grain throw.

If you look at how a meter works, there’s a volume-adjustable cavity that rotates in position under the propellant supply, fills with propellant, and then rotates back, to dispense the propellant through an outlet. When it rotates, the granules contained in the meter are struck off, fixing and sealing the amount of propellant in the “hopper,” I call it.

A few things: One is that the smaller the granules, the more precise each fill can be. Longer-grained kernels have more air space and “stack” more than smaller-grained kernels. It’s also clear that the higher degree of precision on the internal sliding surfaces, the more “clean” the strike-off will be. It’s also clear that meter operation has a lot to do with the consistency of filling the hopper. Just like tapping a case bottom settles the propellant to a lower fill volume, same thing happens when filling the hopper in a meter.

Not too heavy, not too light. Work the handle the same each time, and have it come to a positive stop. “Thunk. Thunk.” Focus on a consistent speed. This has a huge effect on how consistent the throws will be.
Not too heavy, not too light. Work the handle the same each time, and have it come to a positive stop. “Thunk. Thunk.” Focus on a consistent speed. This has a huge effect on how consistent the throws will be.

A key to good throws is working the meter handle consistently, and also settling on a contact force when the meter handle comes to a stop in the “fill” direction. It should bump but not bang. I wish I could be more clear on that, but it’s a feel that must be developed. Don’t go too slowly and gingerly take the handle to its stop, and don’t slam it there either. You want a positive, audible “thunk” when the handle stops. If it’s the same each time, fill consistency will improve. I have found that focusing on operating the handle at a constant rate of speed teaches this. It’s a positive movement that, for me, takes about one second to lift the handle.

The author recommends longer drop tubes, whether it’s for a meter or a funnel. The longer tube has the same effect as tapping the case to settle the propellant. This helps when loading stick propellant into small cases, like .223 Rem. A dryer sheet rubber-banded around the propellant container eliminates static influence, which indeed can be an influence, especially in the Western regions. And do not leave propellant in a meter! Return it to a sealed container when you’re done for the day. This setup is a Harrell’s Classic with a Sinclair stand.
The author recommends longer drop tubes, whether it’s for a meter or a funnel. The longer tube has the same effect as tapping the case to settle the propellant. This helps when loading stick propellant into small cases, like .223 Rem. A dryer sheet rubber-banded around the propellant container eliminates static influence, which indeed can be an influence, especially in the Western regions. And do not leave propellant in a meter! Return it to a sealed container when you’re done for the day. This setup is a Harrell’s Classic with a Sinclair stand.
This is a Harrell’s Premium. Its accuracy is astounding and is the author’s choice. With H4895, the “10-throw” test is within a tenth of a grain, for the whole pan-full.
This is a Harrell’s Premium. Its accuracy is astounding and is the author’s choice. With H4895, the “10-throw” test is within a tenth of a grain, for the whole pan-full.

 

 

Long Range Shooting: Bryan Litz and The Science of Accuracy

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Scoring consistent hits on targets at long distances takes more than chance. Bryan Litz, founder and president of Applied Ballistics LLC., chief ballistician at Berger Bullets and champion rifle shooter, says accuracy at any range is a science. Litz shares how he got his start in long-range shooting and why he’s so passionate about the science of accuracy. For those interested in learning more about the science of long range shooting, Applied Ballistics will hosting several seminars throughout 2016. Enter promo code ABSEM100 during checkout and to save $100.

Ruger Introduces 10/22 Takedown Lite

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The 16.12-inch tensioned barrel features a 1/2"-28 threaded muzzle and is fitted with a thread cap, which can be removed to allow for the use of muzzle accessories.
The 16.12-inch tensioned barrel features a 1/2″-28 threaded muzzle and is fitted with a thread cap, which can be removed to allow for the use of muzzle accessories.

Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc.’s Ruger 10/22 Takedown Lite combines the attributes of the 10/22 Takedown line with a new, lighter weight barrel and the Ruger Modular Stock System.

This new barrel configuration consists of a cold hammer-forged alloy steel barrel mated with a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy sleeve. The barrel nut is torqued to precise factory specifications to optimize performance.

Taking a page from the Ruger 22/45 Lite, the 10/22 Takedown Lite’s aluminum alloy barrel sleeve is ventilated, resulting in the lightest-weight 10/22 target barrel yet from Ruger. The barrel and sleeve are torqued to an optimum setting to provide outstanding accuracy both at ambient temperatures and when heated by long strings of fire or by employing a sound suppressor.

The aluminum sleeve is manufactured with an array of small diameter, circular ventilations that not only provide a striking look but also aid in heat dissipation during extended use.

The 10/22 Takedown Lite weighs 4.7 pounds and is 34.50 inches long when assembled; each subassembly is less than 20.25 inches long. Disassembly is a simple matter of pushing a recessed lever, twisting the subassemblies and pulling them apart. The 16.12-inch tensioned barrel features a 1/2″-28 threaded muzzle and is fitted with a thread cap, which can be removed to allow for the use of muzzle accessories. The 10/22 Takedown Lite also incorporates the Ruger Modular Stock System and comes with both low and high comb and standard length-of-pull modules.

The rifle is shipped in a convenient carrying case, which provides ample storage with extra pockets and magazine pouches. Multiple attachment points for the padded, single shoulder strap offer a variety of carrying options.

The Ruger 10/22 Takedown Lite Models include Model 21152, which has a black receiver and a list price of $659; the Model 21153 with a blue-anodized receiver and blue aluminum sleeve; the Model 21154 with a red-anodized receiver and red aluminum barrel sleeve; and the Model 21155 with green metal treatment.

Winchester 1886 Called Most Expensive Single Gun Ever Auctioned

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For a rifle of its age, Lawton’s Winchester 1886 #1 was in “Excellent” condition at the time of its sale in April. The barrel and magazine retained 95% of the original blue finish. The receiver shown here retained 90% of the original case colors. Photo courtesy of Rock Island Auction Company.
For a rifle of its age, Lawton’s Winchester 1886 #1 was in “Excellent” condition at the time of its sale in April. The barrel and magazine retained 95% of the original blue finish. The receiver shown here retained 90% of the original case colors. Photo courtesy of Rock Island Auction Company.

A Model 1886 Winchester rifle presented to Henry Ware Lawton, a U.S. Army captain widely credited with capturing Apache leader Geronimo, is now the most expensive single firearm ever sold at auction after drawing $1.26 million at Rock Island Auction Company’s April sale.

According to Rock Island Auction Company (RIAC), other guns have sold higher as a pair, but no other single firearm surpasses this new world record.

The Winchester Model 1886 Sporting Rifle (serial number 1) was presented to Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Capt. Henry W. Lawton by fellow Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient, friend and influential firearms designer and noted friend of the Browning family Lieut. George E. Albee. The rifle and a gold pocket watch were presented to Capt. Lawton by the “Cattlemen of Central New Mexico” as a token of their appreciation for his service in the capture of the Apache Indian Chief Geronimo and his band in 1886.

“It is an honor to be entrusted with an American treasure,” said Rock Island Auction Company President Kevin Hogan. “Being serial number one and possessing such outstanding condition would alone be enough to draw six figures at auction. When you add one of the most famous names in the history of the Old West you have a huge crossover appeal and set the stage for something special to happen.”

In the summer of 1886, a force under the command of Capt. Lawton and Capt. Charles Gatewood pursued Geronimo and other hostile Chiricahua Apaches into Mexico and the Arizona territory. In September 1886, Gatewood and Lawton found Geronimo and negotiated the surrender of the last band of hostile Apaches to the U.S. Army. Lawton and Gatewood escorted the Apaches to San Antonio for holding before the band was transferred to Florida.

Albee, a friend of Lawton’s from the Civil War, worked for Winchester and was able to secure serial number “1” of the company’s newest rifle design in 1886. He presented it to his old war buddy and lifelong friend to commemorate Lawton’s remarkable achievement.

Watch the video below for more about this remarkable rifle. Or click on the links below to read a detailed account of the men involved with the rifle.

The Capture of Geronimo, Part I

The Capture of Geronimo, Part II

New: Inland M1 Scout Carbine in .30 Carbine

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Inland Manufacturing has begun making a .30-caliber Scout Carbine with a black-anodized-aluminum upper handguard and Picatinny rail, so that the shooter can mount long-eye-relief scopes on the rifle. MSRP: $1,239.

Inland M1 Scout Carbine in .30 Carbine
Inland M1 Scout Carbine in .30 Carbine

Inland’s Picatinny rail also makes it possible to mount red dots, lasers, lights and other accessories. The Inland Scout Carbine also has military-type iron sights. The rail/handguard is attached to the barrel.

The Scout Carbine is chambered in .30 Carbine and is fitted with a military-style conical flash hider. The barrel thread is 1/2×28, so the flash hider may be removed to fit a suppressor or other muzzle treatment.

The American walnut stock is sprayed with a proprietary industrial textured polymer that gives it a tough black finish.

Inland’s Scout Carbine will accommodate 10-, 20-, and 30-round military magazines, and it is sold with one 15-round magazine in all states except California, where it is sold with one 10-round magazine.

The rifle weighs 5.5 pounds (without bases, rings, and scope) and has an 18-inch barrel (including flash hider). Overall length is 35.75 inches.

Current Inland carbines are serialized starting at 9,000,000 and have a definitive barrel marking to ensure they’re not confused with original U.S. military carbines built during W.W. II.

Are you looking to get your hands on one of these Inland Manufacturing .30-caliber Scout Carbines?