Category Archives: Shotguns

SKILLS: Three Self-Defense Myths That Just Won’t Die

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Don’t buy into these age-old myths! Sheriff Jim tells the truth, and the truth might just save your life… Keep reading!

defensive rounds

SOURCE: NRA Publications, Shooting Illustrated
by Sheriff Jim Wilson

Just about the time it appears they have been proven false and dismissed, the same self-defense and gun myths pop again. Part of this is probably due to the fact there are always new people who finally realize they need to do something about their personal safety and begin seeking answers. Unfortunately, it is also due to the tendency of some people to pass on advice they have heard, but never took the time to find out if it is really true. Since it sounds cool, it must be right. This is one of the many reasons why defensive shooters need to receive professional training. With a good, professional instructor, it is remarkable how many of these myths quickly fall by the wayside and are replaced by cold, hard facts. Let’s look at three of the old self-defense myths that just won’t die and discuss the truths they conceal.

Myth No. 1: Hit him anywhere with a .45 and it will knock him down. This myth probably started with the advent of the .45 Colt back in the 1870s, but it has been repeated most often when people refer to the .45 ACP. Nowadays, you will hear it touted regarding the .44 Mag., the .41 Mag., the .40 S&W or whatever new and powerful pistol cartridge that has just been introduced. The truth was discovered way back in 1687, when Sir Isaac Newton published his third law of motion. Newton stated that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. In other words, if a bullet shot from a handgun was so powerful that it could actually knock a person down, it would also knock the shooter down. There are a lot of reasons why a person who is shot may appear to fall down, or even be knocked down. But, the truth is the force of the bullet striking him is not knocking him off his feet. That only happens in the movies and TV. In reality, a person who is shot with even a relatively powerful handgun may show very little indication of being hit. There will also be very little sign of blood, especially at first. Therefore, the defensive shooter should not rely on these as cues that the fight is over. The important thing is to recover from recoil, regain your sight picture and quickly re-evaluate the threat. If the criminal is still armed — whether or not he is on his feet — and if he appears to still be a threat, additional shots may be necessary. Just don’t expect the bad guy to go flying off his feet, because it probably won’t happen.

Myth No. 2: There’s no need to aim a shotgun, just point it in the general direction of the bad guy and fire.
The shotgun is an awesome firearm that is altogether too often overlooked by today’s defensive shooters. However, it is not a magic wand. People who claim you don’t have to aim a shotgun have simply never done patterning tests with their favorite defensive smoothbore. When shot exits a shotgun barrel, it does so in almost one solid mass. That mass is smaller than a man’s fist. It is only as the shot travels downrange that it begins to spread apart, and it spreads much more gradually than a lot of people expect. Whether you are using buckshot or birdshot, from 0 to 10 yards you should consider it to be one projectile. Actually, by about 7 yards the shot has begun to spread noticeably, but not as much as you might think. From 10 yards to about 25 yards, the average shotgun will deliver a pattern that will still stay on the chest area of a silhouette target. But, by 25 yards some of the pellets may stray off target. When dealing with a threat at 25 yards and beyond, it’s time to think about transitioning to a slug. Instead of taking anyone’s word for it — mine included — the defensive shotgunner should run pattern tests using his shotgun from extremely close range out to 25 and 30 yards. He will also find his shotgun performs better with one brand of ammunition than others. There are a lot of reasons for this preference for particular loads, but the defensive shotgunner should know this occurs and make his selection accordingly. The smart defensive shooter will run tests until he knows which load his gun prefers and exactly what his shot pattern is doing at the ranges his shotgun could be called upon to perform. Always true: don’t just believe it, test it!

Myth No. 3: If you have to shoot a bad guy in your front yard, drag him into the house before calling the cops.
As ridiculous as this may sound, it is one of the self-defense myths that just won’t go away. A student brought it up once in a defensive pistol class. There are couple of good reasons why this is a terrible idea.
To begin with, most states determine the justification for using deadly force as being a reasonable response to prevent immediate death or serious bodily injury. Therefore, if a person is justified in defending himself inside his home, he is also justified in defending himself in his yard, because he is under an immediate attack in which he could be killed or seriously injured. This varies from state to state, so check your own state’s laws before determining your home-defense plan. The second, equally important, reason is the crime scene will quickly make a liar out of you. Any investigator worth his salt will know within five minutes that you moved the body. And, if you’re lying about that, you are probably lying about everything else, or that’s what the investigator will assume. It is the quickest possible way to go directly to jail. Protecting yourself in a completely justifiable shooting can get expensive. So can lying to the police about a shooting.
Part and parcel to obtaining a defensive firearm should be obtaining advice from a criminal defense attorney. He can tell you what your state laws are, how they are interpreted in court and the limitations regarding use of deadly force and how they apply to a legally armed citizen. Getting that sort of advice from the guys down at the bar or from an Internet commando is a sure-fire recipe for disaster.

ATF Goes Through Major NFA Branch Reorganization

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BATFE organizational changes might mean greater processing efficiency and shorter wait time. Here’s the scoop…

Source: Recoilweb.com

If you own or have been thinking about owning an NFA item like a short-barreled rifle (SBR) or silencer, no doubt you know that processing times have been going up. The reason is ATF Rule 41F, which became active in July of 2016. The increase of required paperwork under the new rules combined with the front-loading of many submissions by those attempting to make it before the deadline have led to a larger workload for the NFA Branch. It hasn’t helped the silencer industry either.

SBR

But on April 3, 2017, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (BATFE) made some major changes that amounted to a complete reorganization of the National Firearms Act (NFA) Branch.

In an attempt to better provide oversight, cut down wait times, and increase efficiency, two distinct new branches have been formed: The Industry Processing Branch (NFA IPB) and the Government Support Branch (NFA GSB).

The NFA IPB is responsible for industry forms processing and working towards refining current operations.

The duties of the NFA GSB include processing SOT applications, government transfers, exemptions, and expediting LEO/Gov requests.

Furthermore, a new NFA Division Staff Program Office has been formed to manage publications, FOIA requests, respond to data calls, and oversee the vetting of statistical data.

suppressor

These new changes just might mean greatly reduced wait times — keep your fingers crossed!

NSSF Applauds Bipartisan Introduction of Target and Marksmanship Training Support Act of 2017

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H.R. 788 would provide more money for public shooting range development, read more…


Source: National Shooting Sports Foundation


shooting instruction

The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), the trade association for the firearms, ammunition, hunting and shooting sports industries, has praised the bipartisan introduction of H.R. 788, the Target and Marksmanship Training Support Act of 2017 in the U.S. House of Representatives, sponsored by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif).

“This legislation would provide state fish and game agencies more flexibility to use Pittman Robertson excise taxes dollars raised from the sale of firearms and ammunition to enhance existing public shooting ranges and to build new ones to meet the growing need for additional places for target shooters to participate in their sport,” said Lawrence G. Keane, NSSF senior vice president and general counsel. “Public shooting ranges provide hunters a place to sight in rifles and shotguns before hunting seasons, for people to take firearm safety and hunter education courses and, for recreational target shooters to enjoy their sport.”

Joining Congressman Hunter are 23 original bipartisan cosponsors, including Reps. Jared Polis (D-Colo.), Henry Cuellar (D-Texas), Tim Walz (D-Minn.) and Peter Welch (D-Vt.).

Since 1937 almost $11 billion has been raised for wildlife conservation through the Pittman-Robertson excise tax on the sale of firearms and ammunition. States are permitted to use some of those funds for hunter education course and for public shooting ranges under a restrictive formula that has largely discouraged state agencies from building and enhancing public shooting ranges. The legislation would provide states greater flexibility on their ability to use Pittman Robertson excise tax funds by increasing the cap of federal funds accrued for the creation and maintenance of shooting ranges from 75 to 90 percent. This means states could begin work on range facilities with 10 percent matching funds, instead of the current 25 percent. It would also allow excise funds to be made available and accrue for five years for land acquisition or range construction.

In addition, the legislation would limit frivolous lawsuits that might result from the use of federal land for target practice and encourage federal agencies to cooperate with state and local authorities for maintenance of ranges on federal lands.

Target shooters are largely responsible for the funds derived through excise taxes from the sale of firearms and ammunition products. That money is directly responsible for habitat conservation, recreational shooting and wildlife management, making gun owners, hunters and manufacturers largest financial supporters of wildlife conservation throughout the United States.

Passage of H.R. 788, the Target and Marksmanship Training Support Act of 2017, would ensure that the Pittman-Robertson Act continues to maximize wildlife conservation.

The Target and Marksmanship Training Support Act was previously introduced H.R. 2406, the SHARE Act (Title II)  and the Bipartisan Sportsmen’s Act  in the last Congress as well as a stand-alone bill H.R. 2463  in the 113th Congress.


About NSSF
The National Shooting Sports Foundation is the trade association for the firearms industry. Its mission is to promote, protect and preserve hunting and the shooting sports. Formed in 1961, NSSF has a membership of more than 12,000 manufacturers, distributors, firearms retailers, shooting ranges, sportsmen’s organizations and publishers. For more information, visit www.nssf.org.

Just Announced! New Hornady 2017 Products

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Christmas came early for those of us who follow Hornady, with their announcement of new products to expect in 2017. Let’s kick things off with the product launch video. Just a head’s up, it’s a beefy video, with tons of products listed, so if you want to break it down into multiple parts, then Click Here.

WOW! Here’s a few of the big takeaways we’re excited about…

Reloading-

Case Prep Duo:

Let’s start with the Case Prep Duo. Chamfering and deburring will be afar easier process with this handy little tool, with handy being the operative word. The swivel handle allows what is essentially a powered hand drill, to turn into a table top case prep station, stabilized by two rubber feet.

The Hornady case prep duo

Lock-N-Load® AP Tool Caddy:

Keep your commonly used reloading hand tools in easy reach with the L-N-L Tool Caddy. Swivel the arm to accommodate a righty or a lefty, then fill the arm with whatever tools you need to keep you focused on the task at hand.

the lock n load ap tool caddy

Ammunition-

America’s gun runs on black

Best said by Neil Davies, Hornady Marketing Director, “Without a doubt, black guns are the most popular firearms in America right now…” Hornady took this fact to heart, and began to make ammunition which would optimize the performance of America’s favorite guns. “Loaded with legendary Hornady® bullets, Hornady BLACK™ ammunition is designed to fit, feed and function in a variety of platforms. Direct impingement, gas piston, suppressed, unsuppressed, inertia, bolt, pump, supersonic, subsonic, rifle, mid-length, carbine or pistol – Hornady BLACK™ ammunition delivers superior performance for a variety of applications. Made in the USA.”

Hornady Black Ammo

Click Here for a full list of the offered ammo.

Bench Necessities-

Hornady® Reloading Handbook: 10th Edition:

One of the most valuable tools to any reloader, is knowledge, and what better way than with over 1,000 pages of well over 1,300 loads, including some new ones, like the 280 Ackley Improved, 7×64 Brenneke and the 338 Federal.

the new hornady reloading manual 10th edition

We’ll be reporting, in-depth, on the multitude of new Hornady products hitting the shelves soon, as well as a timeline as to when you can expect them to appear for purchase at Midsouth Shooters Supply. Stay Tuned!

Did you watch the whole video? Was there a product mentioned you’d like more info about? Let us know in the comments!

Stevens Offers Three New Affordable Shotgun Models

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Suffield, Connecticut-based Stevens has recently introduced three new shotgun products to its extensive line of affordable scatterguns: the semi-automatic 12-gauge S1200, the 12-Gauge Model 320 Waterfowl Camo Pump Shotgun, and 28-Gauge and 410-bore chamberings of its 555 over-under shotguns.

Stevens Shotguns Ad

The S1200 is the company’s first semi-automatic shotgun. It features an inertia-driven self-loading action with a walnut, camouflage synthetic, or all-weather matte black synthetic stock. The 6.6-pound S1200 has a 3-inch chamber, rotating bolt and is offered with a 26- or 28-inch vent-rib barrel that accepts the Beretta Mobilchoke system. Five versions, starting at $573 and ranging up to $685, will be offered.

The Mossy Oak Shadow Grass camo 320 series 12-gauge pump shotgun offers dual slide bars, a rotary bolt, synthetic stock, vent rib barrel and a five-round capacity. It features interchangeable chokes, green fiber optic front sight and is available in both standard length-of-pull and compact versions. Two models priced at $273 MSRP will be available.

The 555 has a scaled-to-gauge lightweight aluminum receiver. The receiver employs a steel insert that reinforces the breech to maximize strength while keeping weight down.

Standard features include a Turkish walnut stock and forend, shell extractors, a tang-mounted manual safety, a chrome-lined barrel, and a single, selective, mechanical trigger. The shotgun also includes 5 interchangeable choke tubes. Part No. 22166 is the 28 gauge model with a 3-inch chamber, MSRP $692; the 22166 is the .410 Bore, also with a 3-inch chamber, MSRP $692.

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Five Guns Every Shooter Should Own

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Owning firearms takes money, which comes as no surprise to anyone here at MSS. So one important question is, when you’re building your collection, what are your must-haves and can’t-do-withouts?

Everyone’s list is different, but here’s one that makes a lot of sense to us for five guns every shooter should own:

#1
.22 LR rifle and ammunition to feed it. What action and brand of rifle? Your pick. How much is enough rimfire ammo to have on hand? We think keeping a rolling stock of 5,000 rounds minimum is about right.

#2

.22 LR handgun. A complement to #1, so it can be semi-auto or wheelgun.

#3
Defensive concealable handgun. Most will prefer semi-autos, but wheelguns are fine. Need to keep on hand at least 500 to 1,000 rounds minimum — and extra mags or speed-loaders depending on your pick.

#4

Semi-auto battle rifle. 5.56 chambering is a mainstay, of course, but 30-cals do more farther away. Again, money raises its ugly head when you’re counting round inventory, but we think 1k is the minimum to have on hand for this.

#5
A 12-gauge shotgun. Pumps are famous for their reliability, and upkeep is minimal. Rounds to have on hand include at least 250 bird-suitable shotshells (#7’s), a similar amout of buckshot loads, and a similar amount of slugs.

If we were to expand the list one slot, we’d next include a bolt rifle chambered in the same cartridge as #4, which would suggest the semi-auto and bolt gun both be .308s. Another way to go would be to co-chamber #3 and #4 in a handgun round, such as the 45 ACP. A handgun-cartridge-chambered carbine has a lot going for it, but you would have to accept reduced range.

What’s your lineup of five must-have firearms? Let us hear about it in the comments section below.

 

MSS isn’t recommending any particular brand or models here, just a suitable collection of five should-have firearms. Top, Ruger makes several rimfire rifles and handguns that can make this list, including the SR22 pistol, the 10/22 rifle, and the 22/45 pistol. The company is also selling suppressors for them now as well. Cans are handy, but optional, on our list. Second from top is a suitable self-defense sidearm, this one being Springfield Armory’s 1911 Range Officer Pl9129LP chambered in 9mm Luger. Below that is a semi-auto self-defense rifle; this one is a Daniel Defense DDM4V7LW chambered in 5.56 NATO. And rounding out our list is, bottom, a Mossberg 590 Magpul 50669 Pump 12 Gauge. What does your list include?
MSS isn’t recommending any particular brand or models here, just a suitable collection of five should-have firearms. Top, Ruger makes several rimfire rifles and handguns that can make this list, including the SR22 pistol, the 10/22 rifle, and the 22/45 pistol. The company is also selling suppressors for them now as well. Cans are handy, but optional, on our list. Second from top is a suitable self-defense sidearm, this one being Springfield Armory’s 1911 Range Officer Pl9129LP chambered in 9mm Luger. Below that is a semi-auto self-defense rifle; this one is a Daniel Defense DDM4V7LW chambered in 5.56 NATO. And rounding out our list is, bottom, a Mossberg 590 Magpul 50669 Pump 12 Gauge. What does your list include?

SHOT Show 2016 Special Edition: New Shotguns

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Guest post by Richard Mann, courtesy of SHOT Daily.

It does not matter whether your scattergun passion involve pheasants under the wide and western South Dakota skies, Osceolas in a Florida swamp, a game of clays, or defending your castle from the evil menace, 2016 has a selection of new shotguns to satisfy your cravings. The new introductions include new finishes, new styles, new colors, and new configurations. Combine all these new guns with the new shotshell loads soon to be available, and it looks like 2016 will be a really good year for shotgun shooters.

Browning

Thanks to Browning, 2016 will not be lacking new high-grade shotguns for the discriminating upland hunter or those who get a thrill every time they see a clay target dusted. The Browning High Grade Program moves into its fourth year with limited-production Citori 725 Grade VII small-gauge shotguns being offered in 20- and 28-gauge and .410. These specimens of scattergun goodness receive as much as 30 hours of hand engraving and touch-up prior to being precisely set into exquisite high-grade walnut. They have blued receivers with deep-relief engraving and gold accents. The stock and forearm feature oil-finish Grade VI/VII walnut with a close radius pistol grip and a palm swell. A John M. Browning Signature fitted case is included. Offered with 28-, 30-, or 32-inch barrels, they are perfect for hunting or clays. Five black extended choke tubes are included. SRP: $6,269.99.

Maybe Browning’s biggest shotgun news is that the Sweet Sixteen is back! Like its most revered predecessor, the new A5 Sweet Sixteen is built on a smaller, lighter receiver for reduced weight and a sleek feel. The A5 uses kinetic energy to power the recoil-operated Kinematic Drive System for reliable function with any load and under the full extremes of weather, temperature, moisture, or grime. The A5 16-gauge receiver is constructed of strong, lightweight aluminum with a black anodized bi-tone finish. The stock—shim-adjustable for length of pull, cast, and drop—and forearm are gloss finish walnut with a close-radius pistol grip and sharp 18 lines-per-inch checkering. The gun uses Browning’s Invector DS choke system; three chokes will be supplied with 2 ¾-inch chambered barrels in 26- or 28-inch lengths. Weight: 5 pounds 12 ounces. SRP: $1,699.99.

Browning has also expanded the Citori 725 Sporting and Field over/under lineup to include 28-gauge and .410 models. Both feature Browning’s Fire Lite Mechanical Trigger system. Sporting models will be offered with 30- or 32-inch ventilated-rib barrel lengths and will be supplied with five extended Standard Invector choke tubes. The receiver has a silver-nitride finish with gold accented engraving. Stock and forearm are Grade III/IV walnut with a gloss oil finish. Weight: 7 pounds 4 ounces. SRP: $3,199.99.

The new Citori 725 Field small-gauge models will feature a silver-nitride finish receiver accented with high-relief engraving. Stock and forearm are Grade II/III walnut with a close-radius pistol grip in gloss oil finish. Available with 26- or 28-inch and ventilated rib barrels; the weight is 7 pounds 3 ounces. SRP: $2,539.99. Booth #10744. (browning.com)

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Cimarron

Cimarron has added the 1883 deluxe shotgun and the 1889 standard shotgun to its line of double-barrel scatterguns. The Cimarron 1883 and 1889 shotguns are modern inside but period outside. They do not replicate or copy any specific firearm; however, features of original shotguns from the Cimarron collection inspired these pieces. The most striking visual feature of the deluxe is the engraved side-lock-style construction. These shotguns, with the 18- and 20-inch barrels in .410, and with the 22-inch barrels in 12-gauge, were designed specifically for the Cowboy Action shooter. The 1883 deluxe versions with the 26-inch barrels in .410 and 28-inch barrels in 12-gauge were designed for field use. SRP: $617.50, the 20-inch model 1889; $812.50 all versions of the 1883.

Doc Holiday fans will be excited to see the Cimarron “Doc Holliday” double-barrel shotgun, which is very close to Doc’s original short-barreled double with hammers that was handed to him by Virgil Earp at the real Gunfight at OK Corral. It comes in 12-gauge . SRP: $1,605.46. (cimarron-firearms.com)

CZ-USA

CZ has a host of new scatterguns in almost every category. The CZ 712 Green G2 adds a little color to the mix. This 712 has the same world-record-setting reliability as its black predecessor, but with a green anodized receiver. With the same laser-cut checkering, healthy palm swell, and smooth gas-operating system, it’s sure to please at the range or in the field. With a capacity of 4+1 (and a plug to reduce that to 2+1), the 712 Green ships with five flush choke tubes. SRP: $499.99.

Using input from competitors in the growing sport of 3-Gun, the CZ 712 3-Gun G2 is set to be the perfect entry-level shotgun for the 3-Gun game. An extended bolt handle and oversize bolt release make manipulating the action easier, and the ATI fluted magazine extension bumps capacity to 9+1. It ships with three extended black choke tubes. The CZ 712 Synthetic is a great tool for the person who needs a rugged, weatherproof shotgun. It’s built for the harshest conditions, dipped head to toe in Mossy Oak Shadow Grass Blades camo, with a polymer stock that will take a beating. It’s available in 12-gauge with a 3-inch chamber, 28-inch barrel, and three extended choke tubes. SRP: $679.

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In the break-action arena, CZ has even more to be excited about. Adding a bit of character to its workhorse bird gun, the Upland Ultralight Green gets a splash of color on its anodized green receiver. It has all the same great features of the Upland Ultralight, including five interchangeable chokes, laser-cut checkering, and a mid-rib. It comes in 12- and 20-gauge. SRP: $762 to $768.

Built specifically for ATA shooters who compete in both trap singles and doubles, and want one gun to do it all, the All-American Trap Combo is the tool and ships with two sets of barrels. One is a single-shot “un-single” with a dial-adjustable aluminum rib. The other is a standard barrel set with a stepped rib. The CNC-milled action is surface-hardened to ward off corrosion, resulting in a beautiful white metal finish that resembles brushed stainless. With an adjustable parallel comb, competition trigger, and auto ejectors, this set is ready to dominate the trap field. SRP: $3,399.

A new addition to the CZ over/under lineup, the Drake is built to be the best bang for the buck when it comes to over/under shotguns. Using the same CNC action and internals as other CZ shotguns, the Drake features extractor operation, a single-selectable trigger, a mid-rib, and laser-cut checkering. Available in 12- and 20-gauges with 28-inch barrels, the Drake ships with a set of five interchangeable chokes. $635.

The flagship of CZ’s over/under line, the tried-and-true Redhead, also gets a new one-piece CNC receiver. In addition, it gets the same laser-cut checkering, solid mid-ribs, pistol grip, and a classy white bead. The Redhead Premier is a true all-purpose shotgun suitable for sporting clays or chukar. With a silver receiver and ejectors, the Redhead Premier is available in 12- and 20-gauge with auto ejectors and 28 and .410 with extractors. SRP: $1,057. (cz-usa.com)

Iver Johnson

Stepping into 2016, Iver Johnson has three new shotguns—two for hunters and one directed at the tactical/home-defense consumer. The IJ600 is an over/under available in 12, 20, and .410. It comes with 28-inch barrels and is fitted with internal chokes. Other features include a checkered walnut stock and forend, an engraved receiver in black or silver, ventilated rib with a bead front sight, and a selector switch on the safety. Length: 44.87 inches; weight: 7 pounds 5 ounces.

Iver Johnson’s IJ500 is a semi-automatic shotgun available in 12- or 20-gauge. It has a 28-inch ventilated-rib barrel with internal chokes. The stock and forend are also checkered and the finish is black. Overall length is 49 inches and the unloaded weight is 7 pounds 2 ounces.

The HP 18 is a departure from the customary Iver Johnson shotgun. Designed for the tactical operator or law-abiding civilian looking to protect its castle, this 40-inch semi-automatic shotgun is available in 12- or 20-gauge and comes with a 18.5-inch barrel fitted with a muzzle brake. The pistol-grip stock is modular; the buttstock can be removed, leaving only the pistol grip. The high-profile rear sight is fitted to a Picatinny rail and there is a fiber-optic front sight. The HP 18 has an unloaded weight of only 6 pounds 6 ounces. (iverjohnsonarms.com)

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Legacy Sports International

The new Pointer Break Action single-shot shotguns are a great way to teach beginners how to shoot. Available in 12- and 20-gauge and .410, these single shots all come with 28-inch barrels and a fixed, Modified choke. Metal parts are matte black and the synthetic stock is black, too. Each Pointer Break Action has a brass bead front sight. Their outstanding feature is the safety system. Every Pointer Break Action comes with a manual push-button safety, a hammer safety, and a transfer-bar safety. Length: 43.5 inches, weight: 4.8 to 5.4 pounds. SRP: $188. (legacy sports.com)

Mossberg

Although Mossberg might not dominate the defensive/law enforcement shotgun market, it continues to be a leader in this arena. Its new shotguns for 2016 demonstrate the manufacturer’sdedication to providing dependable and affordable tools for the war fighter or armed civilian. The new 500-ATI Scorpion is the perfect balance of time-tested Mossberg 500 reliability and the functionality of ATI components. It is available exclusively through TALO Group Distributors. Mossberg has teamed up with ATI to outfit this model with an exceptional set of components, bringing an unprecedented stock, a heat shield, a sidesaddle, and an accessory rail together in a single coordinated package. The gun features an 18.5-inch barrel and six-round capacity (2 ¾-inch shells).

Mossberg’s higher-capacity variants (five models) of the 589A1 and 590 shotguns offer the convenience and flexibility of seven shots within the typical six-shot dimensions of 18.5-inch barreled pump shotguns. Offerings include three models with bead sights, two with ghost ring sights, one in Typhon camo and one in Marine Coat.

The Pro-Series Waterfowl shotguns are purpose-built for hardcore duck hunting. They were specifically engineered to stand up to the elements during long, wet seasons spent in the blind. Both models feature a Pro-Series Waterfowl engraved receiver, Mossy Oak Shadowgrass Blades camo finish, fiber-optic front sight, a three-choke tube set, and the Stock Drop System, which provides drop-at-comb adjustment shims for a customizable fit. The 85212 version comes in 12-gauge with a 3-inch chamber, a 28-inch barrel, and a ventilated rib. The 82042 version is a 12-gauge as well but has a 3.5-inch chamber, and a 28-inch overboard barrel. Weight for both is 7.75 pounds.

The SA-20 series of easy-handling semi-auto shotguns includes new offerings perfectly suited for wingshooting/competition or turkey hunting. The two new models include an all-purpose walnut-stocked version with a 26-inch barrel and a 22-inch Turkey version in Obsession camo with fiber-optic sights.

Mossberg’s biggest shotgun news might be the newly designed and handsomely appointed 930 Pro-Series Sporting shotgun. Competition-ready features include a beveled loading gate, premium Pro-Series coatings, Cerakote-finished receiver, Briley chokes, and a HiViz TriComp sight. The new ergonomically designed walnut stock includes Mossberg’s Stock Drop System. (mossberg.com)

Remington

Even though Remington’s new V3 Field Sport semi-auto shotgun was big news last year, Remington has not forgotten about the shotgun it brought to the party. For 2016 it is offering a special-makeup 870 Super Mag Turkey shotgun. This 870 has a 3.5-inch chamber and is fully camoed in Mossy Oak Break-Up Country. It has a 21-inch barrel, Hi-Viz sights, and comes with Remington’s Turkey XFull Rem Choke. It will be produced exclusively for Dick’s Sporting Goods.

Two new home-defense 870s have also been added to the line. They are the same as the black synthetic 870 Home Defense models except they are fitted with traditional hardwood stocks. Both have 3-inch chambers and an 18.5-inch barrel with a fixed Improved Cylinder choke. One comes with a four-round tube; the other holds six 3-inch magnum shotshells. SRP: $450 to $475. (remington.com)

TriStar

TriStar has introduced two new shotguns designed specifically for trap shooting, and they are intended to offer shooters the best of both worlds—quality craftsmanship and performance at an affordable price. Designed in part with the help of professional trap shooters, the TT-15 is available in top-single, unsingle, and over/under options. Each model features a Monte Carlo stock and fully adjustable comb made from beautiful Turkish walnut. The TT-15 is fitted with a high-standing three-point adjustable rib, auto ejectors, and a fiber-optic front sight. The over/under TT-15 includes five extended color-coded Beretta/Benelli choke tubes while the top-single and unsingle models include three choke tubes. The TT-15 over/under has 32-inch barrels, weighs 8 pounds 8 ounces, has a 14 5⁄8-inch length of pull. SRP: $1,099. The top-single and unsingle come with 34-inch barrels. SRP: $999.(tristararms.com)

Weatherby

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Two new shotguns have been added to the Element line. The Element Synthetic and Element Waterfowler Max-5 will be offered in 12- and 20-gauge with 3-inch chambers and 26- and 28-inch barrel lengths. Both are supplied with Weatherby’s Integral Multi-Choke System, including Improved Cylinder, Modified, Full, and long-range steel choke tubes, and both will benefit from the addition of durable Griptonite synthetic stock and forend options. Each is available in a matte bead-blasted finish or Realtree Max-5 camo.

Tailor-made for women, young shooters, and anyone who wants the benefits of a more compact firearm, the SA-08 Waterfowler Max-5 provides all the reliable performance features of the proven SA-08 series without sacrificing comfort and shootability. The short 12 ½-inch length of pull ensures proper fit for small-in-stature shooters or hunters wearing heavy gear while the smooth swing of the 24-inch chrome-lined barrel excels in tight quarters. The SA-08 Waterfowler Max-5 Compact weighs 5 ¾ pounds, is available in 20-gauge only, and is chambered for 3-inch magnum loads. All exposed surfaces of the SA-08 Waterfowler Max-5 Compact are clad in Realtree Max-5 camo. SRP: $799. (weatherby.com)

Winchester

Winchester has four new shotguns to tempt you in 2016. The SX3 Ultimate Sporting Adjustable shotgun features a matte nickel-plated receiver and a satin-oil grade II/III walnut stock with an adjustable comb and cut checkering. Each gun also includes a ported Perma-Cote gray barrel with vent rib and Tru-Glo fiber-optic sight and white mid-bead. New features include a Signature Red Briley bolt handle, a bolt-release button, and a magazine-cap weight system. Available in 12-gauge 2 ¾-inch chambering, with 28-, 30-or 32-inch barrel lengths. SRP: $1,869.99.

The new SX3 Composite Sporting Carbon Fiber model features a synthetic stock with a carbon-fiber finish that provides an excellent grip. It also has the Signature Red Briley bolt handle, bolt-release button, and magazine-cap weight system. Receiver, barrel finish, and barrel length options will be the same as on the new Ultimate Sporting Adjustable model. SRP: $1,739.99.

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New in the SXP pump shotgun line is the SXP Extreme Deer Hunter camo model. This 12-gauge pump will feature a synthetic pistol-grip stock with textured gripping surfaces and the Mossy Oak Break-Up Country camo finish.Two interchangeable comb pieces allow you to fine-tune drop at comb for use with iron, electronic, or optical sights. Two interchangeable length-of-pull spaces allow you to fine-tune length of pull. The 22-inch fully rifled barrel features a Tru-Glo fiber-optic front sight and an adjustable rear sight. SRP: $619.99.

Winchester’s new SXP Long Beard 12-gauge model also features a synthetic pistol-grip stock with textured gripping surfaces and the Mossy Oak Break-Up Country camo pattern. Two interchangeable comb pieces and length-of-pull spaces are provided to fine-tune stock fit. An Invector-Plus Extra-Full Long Beard Turkey choke tube provides a tight, dense pattern. The 24-inch barrel, with a 3- or 3.5-inch chamber, features Tru-Glo fiber-optic sights. SRP: $529.99, 3-inch; 3.5-inch: $559.99. (winchester guns.com)

Reporting by SHOT Business Daily, reprinted with permission. SHOT Daily, produced by The Bonnier Corporation and the National Shooting Sports Foundation, covers all facets of the yearly firearms-industry show. Click here to see full issues. Product pricing and availability are at of time of publication and subject to change without notice.