Category Archives: Tactics & Training

SKILLS: 3 Quick and Compact Drills For Your Sub-Compact Carry Gun

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Do not neglect range time with your small carry gun! Here are some fun and valuable drills to hone your skills. KEEP READING

XD-S Mod.2
XD-S Mod.2

SOURCE:  Team Springfieldby Ivan Gelo

One of the old mantras many of us continue to see and hear is that the sub-compact firearm is, “Carried often, but shot little.”

Let me just go on the record right now stating that I TOTALLY DISGREE with this old adage. Like many of you, my every-day carry (EDC) companion is a sub-compact handgun (the dark-earth framed 9mm Springfield Armory® XD-S® ), and I shoot it on a regular basis.

It seems this adage is often repeated by instructors because, in their experience, many of the subcompacts of the past were difficult to manage and the recoil was harsh. These “cons” resulted in little practice time with the firearm.

With the smaller versions of the Springfield XD® series though, I do not find this to be the case at all. I actually enjoy practice sessions with these small pistols.

SPECIAL CONCEALMENT ASSIGNMENT
Quite often I get requests from friends in the security business requiring assistance with multi-day protection details. A few days prior to receiving the Springfield XD-S® Mod.2® for evaluation, I answered one of these calls. After obtaining some of the specifics related to this executive detail, it was clear that a suit and tie were the “uniform” of the day. Knowing that 1) dress belts are not the best rig when carrying full-sized firearms and 2) blending in and concealment were the high priority, I opted to carry my sub-compact 9mm Springfield Armory® XD-S® as my primary firearm. My Springfield Armory® SAINT® was relegated to the trunk of my transport vehicle as the “back-up” weapon. Good choice, I know…

RANGE TIME REQUIRED
With the protection detail a short week out, I focused my range training specifically to the XD-S® 9mm and the .45 caliber XD-S® Mod.2® that I had not yet shot.

I decided to drill / practice three techniques:

One: Movement while drawing, with a concealment garment.
Two: Multiple round engagements, more than the traditional 2 shots per target
Three: “Failure drills”; multiple rounds to the body, followed up by rounds fired to the head.

ccw draw

DETAILS
ONE: Drawing from Concealment with Movement

Practicing the draw, and specifically drawing from concealment if this is your EDC mode, is a MUST. Incorporating movement during a draw is an additional skill set that should be practiced and perfected. Movement makes you a more difficult-to-track target and is therefore worth the investment.

As with all new shooting skills, If you haven’t previously practiced concealment draws or concealment draws with movement, dry draws are HIGHLY recommended first.

When dry drawing / dry firing, the gun is UNLOADED and condition VERIFIED. NO ammo should be allowed in the practice area. And, find a SAFE backstop (that’s able to stop a potential negligent discharge). Dry practice can also be done at the range if your facility permits.

Back to my drill…

There are several methods of drawing from concealment. Some of the more popular are:

Sweeping the cover garment with your strong hand.
Pulling back on the garment with your support hand.
Pulling up on the garment with your support hand.

I personally prefer the “sweep” method. This approach allows my support hand greater freedom to perform any of the numerous defensive empty hand responses, such as a palm heel strike, shielding technique, or deflection.

The Sweep Draw
Sweeping the concealment or cover garment involves only your holster-side (strong) hand:

The hand starts with an open palm, similar to your normal draw, however, the fingers are spread apart more than normal and the pinky and ring fingers curve in slightly.

Use those two fingers to hook the front of the garment and sweep it to the rear and behind / past the holster and firearm. Some instructors teach that during this process the cover garment is also “flung” back (which might clear the gun and draw better). Try both approaches and see which is best you, your carry rig, and the concealment garment you most often use.

With the holster area clear of the garment, draw the firearm as you have trained.

Appendix note: If you prefer appendix carry, it is EXTREMELY IMPORTANT to first practice just the draw portion of this with an unloaded gun! Get that down before you live fire and/or add concealment and movement.

ccw training

TWO: Multiple Round Engagement
This drill does not have to be complex. One target is all that’s needed. I most often use cardboard USPSA or IDPA targets, as I like the zone markings.

Start close — 3 yards — just beyond contact distance. Move the targets out 3 yards at a time as your training progresses, and you master each distance.

The goal is to draw and fire 4 rounds in quick succession. Keeping all hits in the “0” zone or top half of the A zone is what I expect.

At this close range, even a shooter with a moderate skill level, should be able to accomplish this with some practice.

Use a shot timer and start with 1 second splits (time between shots). Decrease your split times by .25 seconds when you can repeatedly put all shots in the “center zone” on demand.

Remember, at this close distance perfect sight alignment is not required. The sight index, “flash sight picture,” or whatever term you use, should deliver good hits on target as long as you do your job keeping the gun aligned with minimal grip pressure increase or hand/wrist movement.

When you make it to the .25 second split time speed, you will have to move the trigger FAST. To do this, you will most likely be “banging the trigger,” but that’s okay. Learn to work the gun at this speed in training; especially when the threat is CLOSE.

THREE: “Failure Drill”
If you are justified in using deadly force on another human being and body shots are not stopping the lethal threat, then face or head shots could be one of the best ways to end the confrontation.

Using the previous drills as a base, after firing 4 rounds in the body at 3 yards, move the shot placement to the face or head area and fire 2 more rounds.

Given the limited rounds in the magazines in your carry sub-compact gun, shot placement is even more critical. Work at speed, but have the discipline to hit the center of the head zone area; the A zone on a USPSA target and the “0” zone on the new IDPA target are a good go / no-go standard.

Again, once you have made improvements at 3 yards, move the target distance out 3 more yards.

multiple round drill

DETAIL DRILLS COMPLETED
In my several training sessions through the noted week, I fired over 300 rounds of .230 grain ball and 50 rounds of duty / self defense .230 grain jacketed hollow point .45 ACP ammunition. As I expected, the Springfield XD-S® Mod.2® was enjoyable to shoot and had zero malfunctions!

So, ”Don’t be that guy…” The one who carries regularly but practices irregularly, especially if your EDC is a sub-compact firearm. Practicing with a sub-compact firearm might even assist with your focus on the fundamentals of shooting.

Once practiced up and proficient with your sub-compact pistol, check your local ranges and their match schedules for International Defense Pistol Association (IDPA) matches. The events are set up with defense-minded scenarios and drawing from concealment is required on most stages. Additionally, there has been an increase in the popularity of back-up gun (BUG) matches, directly designed for your carry gun. Either event, IDPA or BUG, is great for confirming your ability to shoot your sub-compact carry gun under a little pressure.

And what could be more perfect? Take advantage of someone else setting up a match, so you can practice your pistol skills, all while enjoying a variety of challenges and courses of fire.

As a matter of fact, I’m one of those “someone elses” (match directors). If you ever visit the Phoenix area, I’d be honored to have you attend one of my events — 2nd Wednesday night of every month at Rio Salado Sportsman’s Club. DETAILS HERE 

See you and your sub-compact carry gun there!

SKILLS: Counter Sight Fixation

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Watching the front sight is important to accuracy, but there’s more out there to pay attention to! READ MORE

rob leatham rob pincus

SOURCE: Team Springfield, Rob Leatham and Rob Pincus

It’s amazing what “over thinking” can do to your accuracy. Whether you’re in competition or self-defense mode, speed and accuracy are a key part of your shooting acumen. So why do we let fixating on the front sight deter both of those elements?

DON’T FIXATE — JUST AIM
One of the biggest myths about shooting is that we only need to see the sights when firing the gun — the front sight in particular. If it’s bullseye accuracy you are after and the speed of the shot is of little to no concern, knock yourself out. Take aim, put your finger on the trigger and then idle for several seconds, double and triple-checking your sights before firing.

If it’s close and fast, though, and time means winning or dying, you will need another tool.

The truth is when the goal is speed, you will go slower if you “over-aim.” This is because fixating on the front sight can hinder your ability to pull the trigger.

You should be able to get the accuracy you need with an increased level of speed by not requiring that crystal clear front sight.

Here’s why: Often while going for that perfect sight picture, an internal mental battle occurs. Going for “perfection” instead of accepting “good enough,” increases the likelihood of mistakes. Flinching (pulling the gun out of alignment) increases due to the hesitation of pulling the trigger. This of course leads to poor accuracy and it’s slow.

Keep it simple and speedy.

Point the gun at the target, aim, move to the trigger and fire. This should all occur very quickly. Not always one smooth motion, but still done fast. Faster than you can read this sentence.

There are so many old sayings like “slow is fast” or “smooth is fast,” and so on, but just remember this: Fast is fast and accurate is accurate. Sometimes fast is violent and not perfectly clear visually.

Too slow — just like too fast — is bad. Remove any hesitation once the decision to fire has occurred. Only an obstruction of the target or a late decision to abort the shot should stop the process.

If you’re a competition or defensive shooter who wants to maintain a fast pace, don’t bother trying to maintain a perfect, clear sight picture for every shot. It’s not going to happen.

WATCH THE VIDEO

SKILLS: Concealed Carry on the Go

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Dealing with a concealed weapon when you’re out on the road and away from home raises a few questions, here are a few answers! READ MORE

Console storage vault
Console storage vault.

Jason Hanson

LOCATION: Parking lot. Tucson, Arizona
TIME: 8:40 p.m.

An unsuspecting woman had just gotten in her vehicle when a man with a hatchet appeared and demanded her car keys.

The woman retrieved a handgun from her car and told the man to leave, but he ignored her commands. As he raised his hatchet to strike the woman, she shot him. She held the suspect at gunpoint until police arrived to secure the scene and render medical aid.

According to police, the woman stayed on scene and complied with all police requests. The suspect was treated at a local hospital and is expected to survive his injuries. Currently, charges are pending against the man even though he was shot, because the woman shot him in self-defense.

The fact is this woman quite literally saved her life by having an accessible firearm in her car.

Have Permit, Will Travel
With summer here, lots of people will be hitting the roads to visit unfamiliar locales far and wide. So today, I want to share with you some tips for storing firearms in your vehicle.

Just because you are going out of town (or even driving to the store) and can’t carry your gun, you do have options for leaving it in your vehicle. Obviously, I’m a big believer that your gun should always be on your person, but I realize that there are places you may not legally be able to take your firearm — or maybe you don’t want to.

Now, I recommend storing a gun differently based on whether you are in the vehicle or plan on leaving it in the vehicle.

What I mean is if you are in the car traveling, you still want to be able to quickly access your gun in case you need it. However, if you are going into a courthouse for a few hours (for example), you should make sure your gun is secured and out of sight.

Read on for specific recommendations…

You Can Take It With You
There are a number of different holsters on the market designed for use in cars to give quick access to your firearm while you are in your vehicle.

CrossBreed makes a modular holster backed with Velcro so you can conveniently mount it almost anywhere in your car. These types of holsters are a good idea if you spend a lot of time in your car and don’t want to keep your gun on your person.

CrossBreed holster
CrossBreed holsters can have variable use options, including a car mount.

In addition to mounted holsters, you can also find holsters that attach underneath your steering wheel, allowing you to draw quickly while seated. These holsters clip to the piece of plastic that surrounds the steering column.

Another popular alternative is seat drapes. These hang down in front of your seat with a pocket holster to secure your firearm. The nice thing about this option is that seat drapes are easy to remove when not in use.

These are all great options for storing your firearm when you are in the car, but they are not ways I recommend storing your gun when you aren’t there. The fact is these methods usually leave the gun visible, which is the last thing you want to do when you are gone.

Seat drape
Seat drape.

Leave It Behind
On the other hand, let’s say you always carry your firearm but work in a secure building where you can’t have it with you. You need to store it in your car in a manner that will keep it secure, hidden and out of the hands of criminals.

One of the most common places people keep guns in their cars is the glove box. But if someone breaks into your car, this is the first place they’d look. Although if you keep it locked, they might not waste their time trying to get in.

Another option is the center console, which you should also keep locked if you decide to use it. In fact, several companies make locking inserts you can put in the center console to secure your firearm.

Some of those companies are Tuffy, Console Vault, and Guardian. These locking consoles are among the best options for keeping a firearm secure in your vehicle when you are gone.

Another option is to store your gun under the front seat. Some of the same companies I mentioned above also make lock boxes that can slide under the front seat.

Or you could simply buy a small firearms lockbox and secure it to the seat with the cable it comes with. This would prevent a criminal from stealing your firearm even if they did find the safe.

Typically, you are more vulnerable to criminal threats when you’re in your vehicle. It’s critical that you are prepared to defend yourself.

So whether you are taking your family on a road trip or just leaving your gun in your car to go grocery shopping, make sure that your firearm is stored safely and securely.

Jason Hanson is a former CIA Officer and New York Times bestselling author of Spy Secrets That Can Save Your Life. To get a free copy of his book, visit www.SpyEscape.com.

SKILLS: 6 Tips To Getting A Better Grip On Your Gun

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

One of the most poorly understood elements of handgun control is how to grip your pistol. 24-time National Champion Rob Leatham knows a thing or two! READ MORE

rob leatham

SOURCE: Team Springfield, by Rob Leatham

A lot of people struggle to properly position the gun in their hand. There are varying opinions on how much effort, or gripping pressure to use and how to maintain that pressure.

I’m going to outline how to improve your grip and control over a firearm.

1. GET A FIRM GRIP
Most shooters are told to relax and not grip the pistol tightly. This is ok if all you will ever fire is a .22, but even that gun is going to kick. You need to hold firmly.

A new shooter or beginner may have better things on which to concentrate, but even they need have a strong enough grasp to completely control their gun. If you’re an experienced shooter, you can just go ahead and ignore the “relax” part all together.

2. LOCK YOUR WRIST
Many shooters have too much movement in their wrist. This leads to problems returning the gun to alignment and can cause you to move the gun out of alignment prematurely when trying to shoot fast.

Try to immobilize your wrist joint. Being too loose can, in extreme cases even cause weapon malfunctions. When trying to gain speed, the old adage “do not jerk the trigger” should be replaced with “do not move your wrist.”

Keep everything solid as if the gun was mounted in a vise.

3. POSITION THE GUN IN YOUR HAND SO YOU CAN REACH THE TRIGGER
The angle the gun sits in relation to your arm is not that important. Being able to place your finger properly on the trigger is.

Don’t try to align the barrel of the pistol with your arm. For me to reach most triggers, because of my short fingers, the gun actually points a little to the right or outside of the line of my forearm.

4. TWO HANDS ARE BETTER THAN ONE
If you can get both hands on the gun, do it!

The whole point of a two-handed shooting stance is to create a triangle between your shoulders and the gun. Doing so allows the force of the gun to be transmitted through your torso, making recoil much easier to control.

5. KEEP THE PRESSURE ON
Do not vary the amount of pressure you exert on the gun when pulling the trigger. This will cause a shift in the gun’s alignment and start a whole avalanche of problems.

Keep it solid and consistent.

6. PRACTICE HOLDING ON TIGHT
Gripping properly will not just happen. I have to address this issue with many experienced, top-notch shooters. Most think it will just come with practice, but it doesn’t unless you think about it. One area that dry fire can really help is maintaining a tight grip while pulling the trigger.

It’s easy to pick up bad habits from dry firing with no live fire to support the techniques being learned. If you never have to deal with effects of the gun firing, muzzle flip and recoil, you will never learn how to control them.

In my three decades of training every level of shooter, I have seen only a handful that held on too tightly. On the flip side, I’ve seen hundreds that hold on too loosely.

Learn the hand postions and make yourself do them correctly. Remember, you will do whatever you teach yourself to do. Once you memorize a technique, good or bad, that is what is likely to occur when you shoot under pressure.

Make sure you are doing it correctly.

D.C. Political Comedian Robbed At Gunpoint Changes Stance On Guns

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

“That level of fear and that level of helplessness that you feel, it doesn’t compare to anything else I’ve felt in my life…” READ MORE

tim young

SOURCE: WUSA9.com, Dori Olmos

Political comedian Tim Young was heading to The Wharf, one of D.C.’s newest hotspots, when his life changed.

He was walking down a well-lit section of M Street at about 7:45 p.m. on a Wednesday when two men approached him — one of them had a gun.

“Terrified. You know, when I talk to people about this…you’re scared. There’s no man card involved. I was defenseless,” explained Young, who’s a political comedian and host of ‘No Things Considered’ at the D.C. Examiner. The men stole his cell phone and then ran off.

Check out Tim Young’s tweet HERE

Young said that 6 to 7 people witnessed his attack, but no one tried to help him while it was going on. Two people called 911 after it was over and the “rest of the folks walked off.”

Young: “They just stood by and watched as I was yelling for help. ‘Help, I’m being robbed!’ They stood by and watched…”

Young grew up in Southwest Baltimore and said that he had been in some bad places in his life, but nothing ever happened to him then. He assumed things would continue to go that way. Now, he said he absolutely plans to apply for a concealed carry permit in D.C., but that’s not easy; D.C. is one of the toughest places in the country to get a concealed weapons carry permit.

Young: “When you’re in an instance where there’s a gun is pointed at you and your life is being threatened for your property and no one’s going to help, and now I know that no one’s going to help, I want to feel more secure. I want to feel safe, and I have something to defend myself with.”

He addressed people who are against conceal carry permits by saying they’ve probably never been in his position.

“I think a lot of those people who are opposed to having a conceal carry permit and being able to own a weapon have never had one pointed directly at them when they have nothing on them,” Young said.

Read the whole story HERE

 

SKILLS: Take The Curve

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Stay ahead of action-reaction power curve! Steve Tarani lays out a 3-step formula for a personal protection plan. Pay attention! READ IT ALL

steve tarani

SOURCE: Team Springfield, written by Steve Tarani

When it comes to personal protection against an active threat, having a defensive action plan is not a luxury but a necessity. The advantage of such a plan is:

You’re not waiting around to be caught in the middle of an attack.
You are not forced to come up with a solution on the fly.
You have a widened scope of awareness prior to an attack.

Your intent should always be to predict or prevent your involvement in any violent physical threat. However, if you have no choice but to engage a threat, you must consider your response options based on realistic expectations.

REACT FACT
Most people, without ever having attended any formal training, think, “Well, I’ll just shoot him.”

The fact is, should you even consider going to guns (to “shoot yourself out of a bad situation”) in self-defense, means that you’ve been pushed back on your heels reacting to that situation.

Being reactive means you’re already behind the action-reaction power curve and are forced to take immediate physical action to regain the initiative.

WHO TAKES CONTROL WINS
The bad guy(s) will always hold the initiative at the onset of an active threat. They are the ones who decide, when, where, and how the attack will go down. They also determine what weapons will be used, and who will be their victims. Because the bad guys set these battle parameters, they have complete control of the action-reaction power curve.

When challenged with an active threat, your objective is to take back that curve. To do this, you need to accomplish only one task — make them react to you. There is a very simple three-step formula you can follow to take the curve:

Bad guy has control
Good guy makes bad guy react
Good guy takes control

SIMPLE BUT NOT EASY
Although a simple objective, it is not an easy one. You’re starting at a tactical disadvantage. Engaging a threat reactively means that you didn’t see it, hear it, or smell it coming and have been taken off-guard. You’re starting at the bottom of the hill and you must scramble to the top to take control as quickly as possible.

What are some vetted climbing tools you can use to take the curve?

IDENTIFY THE SOURCE
First and foremost is to acquire a clear picture of exactly what’s going on around you. Snap your attention from wherever it was (perhaps buried deeply into your text messages?), to your immediate environment. Instantly scan your surroundings using visual and audio sensory input for threat indicators — such as gunfire, explosions, screeching tires, etc. — and determine the source of the threat. Once you’ve identified the source, your very best tactical option is to create space — distance from any threat is always your friend.

DON’T BE AN EASY TARGET
One of the most effective methods to help you take the curve is to make yourself a more difficult target. If you can’t change your distance, you can certainly change your physical position relative to your threat — such as movement behind cover or to higher ground. To change your distance or position and to make yourself a more difficult target, stay mobile. A moving target is always more difficult to hit than a stationary target.

FORCE A REACTION
Becoming a more difficult target by changing your physical position and staying mobile forces your opponent(s) to react. Your actions have pressed them to ask two critical questions: “1 — Is this difficult target really worth it?” and “2 — Are there softer targets?” It may very well be the case that you ARE NOT worth their continued efforts. If so, they will hunt for lower hanging fruit (softer targets).

Bottom line is that by your decisive actions, you’ve changed the game. You’ve caused them to react. The split second you cause them to react is that exact moment in time that you take control of the action-reaction power curve. And that’s always the best place to be.

To learn more about training conducted by Steve Tarani, go to Steve’s websites:

www.handtogun.com

www.stevetarani.com

About the Author: Steve Tarani, is a former CIA protective services subject matter expert who served on Donald Trump’s pre-election protection detail and is the lead instructor for the NRA’s new Non-ballistic Weapons Training program offered nationally to 2.3 million members. Tarani, an active protective agent, is a Central Intelligence Agency and FLETC-certified federal firearms instructor who also provides services for the US Naval Special Operations Command, FBI National Citizens Academy Alumni Association, National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO), and others.

SKILLS: Free E-Book Download: Anatomy Of A CCW Draw

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

This is a great free resource compiled by some of the best. Get it, read it, practice it! MORE

ccw book

SOURCE Team Springfield

When and where legal, there are many positives to carrying a pistol concealed. Chief among them is the lowered visibility to the outside world. The whole point of concealed carry is to be discreetly armed.

When it comes to drawing your concealed firearm, though, how do the experts do it? What’s the safest and most efficient way?

Our e-book, “Anatomy of a Concealed Carry Draw,” demonstrates:

The two-handed draw and re-holster
The one-handed draw and re-holster
Safety guidelines for firearm handling
Our top recommendations for concealed carry pistols

IF YOU WANT TO CARRY LIKE A PRO, MAKE SURE YOU CAN DRAW LIKE A PRO.

DOWNLOAD the Springfield Armory e-book now, and our experts will show you, step by step, exactly how to draw like a pro.

SKILLS: 4 Dry-Fire Drills To Challenge Any New Shooter

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Learning to shoot better is from a balance of live fire at the range and dry-fire away from the range. Do it with a purpose to get the most from it! READ HOW

dry fire

SOURCE: Team SpringfieldPosted by Ivan Gelo

Dry-practice should be a fairly significant and useful portion of your training package — especially when learning a new technique or focusing on specific principals like the four below.

SAFETY FIRST
Let’s start with the basic safety rules for dry-firing:

CONDUCT with your full concentration — no distractions.
ENSURE the gun is unloaded — no magazine inserted.
VISUAL & TACTILE CHECK — With the slide (or bolt) locked back (via the ejection port) look into the barrel chamber and down through the grip area toward the magazine well to confirm that the firearm is unloaded and no magazine is inserted.
DOUBLE CHECK that all magazines are unloaded — no live ammo.
REMOVE all ammunition from the dry-fire area.
PLACE targets to use as specific aiming points.
CHOOSE a suitable backstop / direction, so that if a round was to discharge, your backstop stops the bullet and causes no injury and minimal physical damage.

Before doing that first trigger press — CHECK AGAIN that the gun is unloaded. Once you’ve gone through the safety checklist, you’re ready to start your dry-fire practice.

1. TRIGGER PRESS DRILL
This is a great exercise that focuses on keeping the gun as still as possible while learning to manipulate the trigger quickly:

Rack slide to set the trigger.
With the gun in your two-handed firing grip at full presentation, bring the gun back to your “natural handclap position” while maintaining grip pressure and hand positions. (I got this description from Ron Avery many years ago — thanks Ron!)

Focus your attention downward, where you are essentially looking over the top of the gun — you are primarily seeing the top of the slide. Press the trigger as you so deem necessary — imagine the type of shot you are trying to replicate, i.e. shooting a group at 15 yards.
As you work the trigger up to the point the striker or hammer is released, pay specific attention to how much left or right movement there is while looking at the top of the slide.

dry fire drill

Most new shooters will see movement to the left or right and/or down or up. This is typically caused by movement in the hands or by the trigger finger. No movement at all means you’ve done a good trigger press!

Repeat starting at Step 1. Once you are able to hold the gun still, increase your trigger press speed. Focus on the consistency and stillness of your hand/grip pressure as you increase the speed of your trigger press. Work up to the point where you are working the trigger quickly — one-eighth-of-a-second from start to finish of press. Minimal to no movement is the goal.

2. START POSITION VARIATIONS
At a match you will, and in real life you might, be drawing from positions other than standing, gun loaded and holstered, with both feet stable on even ground. Practicing varied positions can be extremely beneficial.

Vary your dry-fire start position:

Seated
Holding an item in your hands
Kneeling
Standing behind a wall
Facing “uprange”

You can also vary the gun’s start position:

Gun on a table
Gun in a box
Gun in a drawer

dry fire drill

3. MASTER MOVEMENT
Once you’ve practiced some of these different start “positions,” incorporate movement during your draw or after retrieving your firearm. Movement changes everything! Relocate yourself left, right, forward, back during your practice.

4. BEDTIME ROUTINE
At night, do you keep your firearm on a nightstand, in a drawer, or in a bed-mounted holster? If so, when was the last time you dry-practiced getting out of bed to retrieve your firearm from its location?

And in what condition is your firearm? If you keep your firearm “cruiser ready” or “condition 3” (magazine inserted and seated with the chamber empty), have you practiced racking your slide under duress?

In this situation, dummy or inert training rounds are invaluable! NEVER use live ammo at home to practice quickly loading your gun! Safety first — always.

When using training rounds, go through your safety checks very deliberately — again, remove all live rounds from the training area and check and then check again that all rounds are inert.

Your Biggest Home Security Weakness

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Home security isn’t just about doors and windows. Check the garage… Criminals do! READ HOW

Jason Anderson

breaking and entering

Every 15 seconds, a home in the U.S. is broken into. While most intruders go through the front door, there are a significant number of burglars who break in through the garage.

In October, criminals in Las Vegas broke into the garage of a police officer’s home. They stole the officer’s unmarked white metro police cruiser, which contained a gun, police radio, tactical vest, Taser — even police uniforms.

Obviously, the police want to catch these people, but the reality is this might not have happened if people took their garage security more seriously.

Since criminals often use garage doors as an easy way to access a home, here are five garage security measures I recommend putting in place:

1. Never leave the door opener in your car
Many people park their cars in the driveway and then open the garage door with the clicker to get inside. Thieves will look to see if you’ve left the opener in your car and use it to get into your home.

Breaking into a car is easy and if they can find a garage door opener they can get into your home in seconds. If you tend to leave your opener in your car, you may want to switch to a key fob opener that you can attach to your keychain.

2. Secure the door that leads into your home
Of course, having your garage broken into is frustrating enough, but if burglars also manage to access your home, you are in for a big mess. I’m always shocked when I see people who have the best deadbolts on their front door and a cheap lock on their garage door.

Use quality locks like Schlage and Medeco on your exterior doors, and use them on your garage door as well. In addition, consider a product like Nightlock. This doorstopper security device will make it more difficult for a criminal to kick in your door.

nightlock

3. Cover any windows
If you have windows that allow someone to see into your garage, I strongly recommend always keeping them covered. Not only do windows allow criminals to see what valuable items are inside, but they also make it easy for a criminal to gauge if anyone is home.

Whether you have windows on the garage door or on the side of your home that look into the garage, make sure they are adequately covered.

4. Secure the safety mechanism
All automatic garage doors are legally required to have a release mechanism you can pull that allows you to lift the garage door in an emergency. Since this is for safety, it’s not something I recommend removing.

However, criminals often use coat hangers to reach through the seal around your garage door and pull the emergency release. Once they do this, they can simply lift the garage door and walk right in. What you can do is use a zip tie, put it through the release mechanism and attach it to the pull cord.

Make sure to test this contraption and confirm that you can pull the cord and break the zip tie in an emergency. Basically, you want to make it so it’s not easy for criminals to pull the release but you still want to be able to do it yourself if you have to.

5. Padlock the door when you’re out of town
If you go out of town (or don’t use your garage regularly), you should consider using a padlock to secure the garage door. Depending on the age of your garage door, you can place a padlock on the track of the door, which will keep it from moving. Of course, this isn’t something I recommend doing all the time since it’s a pain to constantly remove the padlock, but it’s a good solution if you won’t be using your garage door for a while.

Of course, these are year-round security considerations. But if you plan on traveling for the holidays — make sure to take the proper precautions to secure your garage, since it’s one of the easiest ways for criminals to gain access to your home.

Jason Hanson is a former CIA Officer and New York Times bestselling author of Spy Secrets That Can Save Your Life. To get a free copy of his book, visit www.SpyEscape.com.

Why You Should Have An AR-15 For Home Defense

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Choosing a home-defense firearm is a very important, and very personal, decision. Here’s a few ideas on another to add to your list. READ MORE

ar15 home defense

Team Springfield

Good news is, a relatively small percentage of people will experience a home invasion during their lifetime.

Bad news is, unless you possess the ability to see into the future, you won’t know if you are one of them until it happens.

If you’re reading this, then you’ve probably already had that realization and have decided to equip yourself for home defense. #BePrepared

Many law abiding gun owners will advocate hard for using a pistol vs. a rifle for home defense. We suggest going to the range yourself and putting the two to the test. Once you’ve put in some trigger time and are familiar with the operations of both weapons, your home defense pistol and an AR-15 rifle, put yourself on a timer and keep score. You might just surprise yourself at how well you perform with the AR.

Having said that, here are a few reasons you should consider selecting an AR-15 to defend your legacy.

EASE OF USE
The primary benefit of the AR-15 platform lies in its intuitiveness and comfortable ergonomics. The position of the fire controls and its overall light weight make the AR easy to operate, and that’s an important factor, especially under pressure.

As with any firearm though, familiarity and continuous training are mandatory. Those who have spent a lot of time with the M16, like so many of our military veterans, will most likely find use of the AR-15 seamless, but first-time rifle owners will obviously need to invest time in training at the range.

EASE OF ACCESS
The biggest challenge to having a firearm for home defense is ease of access. If you need to defend yourself quickly, accessibility is obviously pertinent!

An AR can be just as easily accessible in a home defense situation as another type of firearm. It can be stored in many of the same locations as a shotgun or even a pistol. The sheer size of an AR-15 rifle may also make it easier to grab when things go bump in the middle of the night.

But it’s also mandatory to be diligent with security. It’s common sense and common knowledge, but all firearms must be stored in a secure location, so that non-authorized users cannot gain access.

So, if that means you must unlock your AR-15 at night so you have quick access to it, and then lock it back up in the morning (after you’ve put on your EDC gun), then that is what you must do — every day and every night. #GoodHabits

CAPACITY OPTIONS
Many self-defense shootings involve only a few fired shots, but if you can gain extra capacity with your home defense weapon, you may as well have it. While many double-stack pistol magazines can hold 15 to 18 rounds, a standard AR-15 magazine capacity is 30 (although not legal in some states).

Another, often over-looked, option is the 20-round AR-15 magazine. It makes the rifle just a tad lighter, and you may really like how much more maneuverable it becomes.

SIGHT ACQUISITION
Another great aspect of using an AR-15 for home defense is its ability to be customized with attachments. Putting on a red dot optic will make “finding” your sights far easier in a high-pressure, low-light situation. Again, training is paramount. Those of us who have firearms with optics know that initially, that little red dot may not show up in the center of the scope as quickly as we would like it to.

Mounting a flashlight or laser sight onto the handguard can also be beneficial, though there are pros and cons to these illuminating options. All of the SAINT™ models have either Keymod, or M-Lok rails, so attaching a light or laser can be done quickly and easily.

PENETRATION
A common knock against the AR-15 for home defense is that the 5.56×45 NATO chambering will over-penetrate. This statement is somewhat controversial.

All ammunition, whether for pistols, shotguns, or rifles, is developed for different uses / purposes. With the plethora of 5.56 and .223 ammunition on the market today, you have many options. Most of the lighter weight rounds, and many “varmint” hunting rounds, are designed to break apart when hitting a hard object. There are several other cartridges designed specifically for personal / home defense, such as Hornandy Critical Defense, Black Hills TSX, Federal Vital-Shok, and Winchester PDX-1 Defender.

Take a look around YouTube too. You can search for penetration tests where 9MM, 40S&W, 45ACP pistols and 5.56mm and .223 rifles penetrate a variety of materials such as wood or cinder block.

Do your research, and choose the option that fits your needs within your fortress.

And always make sure your home defense firearm is zeroed with your ammunition of choice.

In the end, regardless of what gun you choose for home defense, if and when the time comes to take a shot, you must always be aware of what’s behind your target and what’s in the line of sight between you and the target.

Check out some great choices HERE