Winchester 1886 Called Most Expensive Single Gun Ever Auctioned

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

 

For a rifle of its age, Lawton’s Winchester 1886 #1 was in “Excellent” condition at the time of its sale in April. The barrel and magazine retained 95% of the original blue finish. The receiver shown here retained 90% of the original case colors. Photo courtesy of Rock Island Auction Company.
For a rifle of its age, Lawton’s Winchester 1886 #1 was in “Excellent” condition at the time of its sale in April. The barrel and magazine retained 95% of the original blue finish. The receiver shown here retained 90% of the original case colors. Photo courtesy of Rock Island Auction Company.

A Model 1886 Winchester rifle presented to Henry Ware Lawton, a U.S. Army captain widely credited with capturing Apache leader Geronimo, is now the most expensive single firearm ever sold at auction after drawing $1.26 million at Rock Island Auction Company’s April sale.

According to Rock Island Auction Company (RIAC), other guns have sold higher as a pair, but no other single firearm surpasses this new world record.

The Winchester Model 1886 Sporting Rifle (serial number 1) was presented to Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Capt. Henry W. Lawton by fellow Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient, friend and influential firearms designer and noted friend of the Browning family Lieut. George E. Albee. The rifle and a gold pocket watch were presented to Capt. Lawton by the “Cattlemen of Central New Mexico” as a token of their appreciation for his service in the capture of the Apache Indian Chief Geronimo and his band in 1886.

“It is an honor to be entrusted with an American treasure,” said Rock Island Auction Company President Kevin Hogan. “Being serial number one and possessing such outstanding condition would alone be enough to draw six figures at auction. When you add one of the most famous names in the history of the Old West you have a huge crossover appeal and set the stage for something special to happen.”

In the summer of 1886, a force under the command of Capt. Lawton and Capt. Charles Gatewood pursued Geronimo and other hostile Chiricahua Apaches into Mexico and the Arizona territory. In September 1886, Gatewood and Lawton found Geronimo and negotiated the surrender of the last band of hostile Apaches to the U.S. Army. Lawton and Gatewood escorted the Apaches to San Antonio for holding before the band was transferred to Florida.

Albee, a friend of Lawton’s from the Civil War, worked for Winchester and was able to secure serial number “1” of the company’s newest rifle design in 1886. He presented it to his old war buddy and lifelong friend to commemorate Lawton’s remarkable achievement.

Watch the video below for more about this remarkable rifle. Or click on the links below to read a detailed account of the men involved with the rifle.

The Capture of Geronimo, Part I

The Capture of Geronimo, Part II

Ammo Answers from Federal Premium

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

The Federal Premium Ammo Insiders explain the different types of handgun ammunition designed for target shooting and personal defense. Some terms explained in the video: Full Metal Jacket (FMJ), Total Metal Jacket (TMJ), and Jacketed Hollow Point (JHP). And in the second video, Federal answers how often you should change your carry ammunition and why — assuming you don’t shoot it up first.

Click here to see our choices of Federal handgun ammunition.


‘Captain Louisiana’ Gets Himself Some

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

 

Captain America: Civil War, the Marvel comic-book flick, is in theaters now, so speed-shooter Jerry Miculek takes a page from the movie and dons a tight Captain America costume to find out if a replica titanium Captain America shield will fight off .45 ACP rounds fired from a 1911 pistol. With his quick trigger finger and incredible-slow-motion camera, Miculek hammers the shield with eight shots.

Then, in Part II, he sees if the shield itself can become an offensive — rather than solely defensive — weapon in “real life.”

The Web’s New Rimfire Master: 22plinkster

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

If you haven’t taken the time to watch his videos, Click Here, settle in, and be prepared ask repeatedly, “How’d he do that?” and exclaim, “Holy Smokes, that was incredible!” We’re always excited to see what new challenge he’ll present himself, and his unique and entertaining approach in each video.

22plinkster

22plinkster has made his home on YouTube as more than just a trick-shot vlogger. He’s become one of the interwebs favorite firearm personalities. Check out the great article from our partners  at Federal Ammunition, and what they had to say about our friend, 22plinkster.

Click Here to read the entire story!

Do you have any suggestions on challenges for 22plinkster? Make your recommendations in the comments below!

Video: One-Handed Walther CCP Takedown

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Dan Davies shows how he takes down his every day carry gun of choice, the Walther CCP.

Walther Arms representatives ran into Dan at the USCCA show in Atlanta on May 1, 2016. He told the company of his affinity for the CCP and how he takes it down one handed. The video below shows how he does it:

Do you think the Walther CCP is too hard to break down? What do you think of Davies’ method?

New: Inland M1 Scout Carbine in .30 Carbine

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Inland Manufacturing has begun making a .30-caliber Scout Carbine with a black-anodized-aluminum upper handguard and Picatinny rail, so that the shooter can mount long-eye-relief scopes on the rifle. MSRP: $1,239.

Inland M1 Scout Carbine in .30 Carbine
Inland M1 Scout Carbine in .30 Carbine

Inland’s Picatinny rail also makes it possible to mount red dots, lasers, lights and other accessories. The Inland Scout Carbine also has military-type iron sights. The rail/handguard is attached to the barrel.

The Scout Carbine is chambered in .30 Carbine and is fitted with a military-style conical flash hider. The barrel thread is 1/2×28, so the flash hider may be removed to fit a suppressor or other muzzle treatment.

The American walnut stock is sprayed with a proprietary industrial textured polymer that gives it a tough black finish.

Inland’s Scout Carbine will accommodate 10-, 20-, and 30-round military magazines, and it is sold with one 15-round magazine in all states except California, where it is sold with one 10-round magazine.

The rifle weighs 5.5 pounds (without bases, rings, and scope) and has an 18-inch barrel (including flash hider). Overall length is 35.75 inches.

Current Inland carbines are serialized starting at 9,000,000 and have a definitive barrel marking to ensure they’re not confused with original U.S. military carbines built during W.W. II.

Are you looking to get your hands on one of these Inland Manufacturing .30-caliber Scout Carbines?

Springfield Armory Releases Limited Edition Chris Kyle 1911 Legend Series TRP Pistol

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

Springfield Armory is pleased to announce the Legend Series Chris Kyle 1911 TRP Pistol. In cooperation with the Chris Kyle Foundation and the Chris Kyle family, the company aims to honor the spirit of American Sniper and Navy Seal Chris Kyle while providing direct support to the foundation. Continue reading Springfield Armory Releases Limited Edition Chris Kyle 1911 Legend Series TRP Pistol

Obama Administration Looks to Deny Firearm Purchases through Social Security

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

post at U.S. Law Shield warns that the Obama administration’s new gun-control measures would strip some Social Security recipients of their Second Amendment rights. A new proposed regulation would use information from the Social Security Administration to determine whether an individual will be allowed to buy a gun!

“Under the proposed regulation, the Social Security Administration would identify any individuals who were ‘adjudicated as mentally defective,’ for the purposes of the 4473 Firearm Purchasing Form,” says Law Shield Independent Program Attorney Michele Byington, who’s also a partner in the Houston law firm Walker & Byington. “The problem is this term is incredibly broad; while it includes people who have been found in a courtroom to be mentally incompetent or committed to a mental health institution against their will, it also includes anyone ‘unable to manage one’s own affairs.’”

michele-byington_1750 copy
Michele Byington, Law Shield Independent Program Attorney

There is no exact definition for “unable to manage one’s own affairs.” One of the departments that already also uses this definition, the Department of Veterans Affairs, interprets the phrase to mean anyone who has been declared incompetent to manage pension or disability payments and assigned a fiduciary. Currently, 4.2 million recipients of Social Security have their payments managed by someone else and could be affected by this new regulation.

Byington said, “If anyone receives Social Security payments on your behalf, you could be banned from buying a gun!”

Information about these potentially millions of people would be provided to the Justice Department four times a year and would be included in the F.B.I.’s NICS background check system. If a person comes up on the background check system as having a mental impairment or as being unable to manage their own affairs, they will not be allowed to exercise their Second Amendment right to purchase a firearm.

The Obama administration’s justification of this proposed regulation is that it will “plug holes” in the background check system with the goal of preventing mentally unfit individuals from obtaining firearms. However, the way the regulation is currently worded could unfairly affect millions of Americans, Byington said.

This proposed regulation could discourage senior citizens from applying for financial management help for fear of losing their Second Amendment rights. It could also unfairly take away rights from those more than capable of safely and responsibly possessing a firearm who have opted to receive their Social Security payments through a representative. Luckily, Congressman Sam Johnson has sponsored a bill that would prevent the agency from placing people who need financial help into the gun background check system.

Do you think this law is the best way to keep firearms in the hands of responsible owners or is it government overreach that will do more harm than good?

Segregating Cases by Weight

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

This is a specially-adapted excerpt from the forthcoming book, “Top Grade Ammo,” by author Glen Zediker, owner of Zediker Publishing. Click here to order from Midsouth.

by Glen Zediker

Weight is another common means of case segregation. I can’t imagine doing this job without an electronic scale, because I have done this job without an electronic scale.

A bag full of new brass is a wonderful thing. Sorting is optional, but worthwhile to get the very most from it.
A bag full of new brass is a wonderful thing. Sorting is optional, but worthwhile to get the very most from it.

Most set a percentage tolerance for weight, not so much seeking identical weights. Otherwise, you’ll have to sort a lot of cases. The physically larger something is, the more variation can exist. 1% is pretty harsh; 1.5% is more reasonable; 2% is commonly used. You’ll figure out the viability of your segregation criteria after you go through a few dozen cases. If you have 10 piles, then the criteria might be too harsh. If you use a percentage, certainly then larger caliber cases will have a greater overall weight tolerance/variance than smaller ones. Think of it as: 1% in a 90-grain .223 is 0.90 grains, and in a .308 Win., it’s 1.7 grains, or about double.

No doubt — cost is the first segregation criteria. The author says components from Europe are better than domestically produced items. But at what cost. The author has used a lot of Norma and Lapua brass, and it’s extra-high-quality, which means low-tolerance/variance. It’s also soft and heavy. I’d be willing to spend for it, but I prefer to sort other brands that are more suitable for use in a repeating action of any type. Hours and hours of doing this showed me that Norma, for example, gives about 5% more “really good” cases compared to the domestic brand I favor.
No doubt — cost is the first segregation criteria. The author says components from Europe are better than domestically produced items. But at what cost. The author has used a lot of Norma and Lapua brass, and it’s extra-high-quality, which means low-tolerance/variance. It’s also soft and heavy. I’d be willing to spend for it, but I prefer to sort other brands that are more suitable for use in a repeating action of any type. Hours and hours of doing this showed me that Norma, for example, gives about 5% more “really good” cases compared to the domestic brand I favor.

This segregation method or means is nearly universally adhered to by NRA Long Range competitors. The belief is that weight reflects on case capacity: heavier cases, lower capacity; lighter cases, higher capacity; and, mostly, same-weight cases, same capacity. Most are not looking for “light” or “heavy,” just “the same.” There’s a correlation between wall thickness consistency and weight consistency, I’m sure, but it’s not direct.

Don’t confuse the ultimate results from an exercise in segregation. We will get what we look for, but that’s all we know for sure. No doubt, the combination of segregation by weight and wall thickness should result in the best of the best, but, dang, that might also result in a very small pile.

Important: Fully prep all the cases prior to weight segregation! The reason is a matter of reliability in the result. Primer pocket uniforming, length trimming, chamfering, and inside flash hole deburring all require removal of brass. The amounts will vary in each instance. I’ve collected and weighed enough shavings from prepping before and can tell you that, if you’re segregating by fine increments, you’re kidding yourself if you don’t follow this advice. The amount of brass removed does not at all directly reflect on the quality of a case because the areas where the weight is originating don’t influence the “overall” quality. But it can influence the scale. Which is the criteria, right?

Weight segregation is easy, but tedious. Establishing criteria limits (defining the contents of each pile) comes mostly from experience in checking examples of the stock being used. Just weigh as you go and label as you learn. Get some plastic containers and label them, after deciding on the range you’re sorting by, and toss the case into the appropriate bin when you pick it from the scale pan. Keep in mind that the goal is to find “light” “heavy” and “okay.” Most shooters I know who weight-segregate are looking for three piles and, of course, the occasional culls.
Weight segregation is easy, but tedious. Establishing criteria limits (defining the contents of each pile) comes mostly from experience in checking examples of the stock being used. Just weigh as you go and label as you learn. Get some plastic containers and label them, after deciding on the range you’re sorting by, and toss the case into the appropriate bin when you pick it from the scale pan. Keep in mind that the goal is to find “light” “heavy” and “okay.” Most shooters I know who weight-segregate are looking for three piles and, of course, the occasional culls.

The procedure used by most winning 1000-yard shooters is to segregate by weight and then outside-turn the case necks to make the neck walls consistent. Again, it ultimately will be a better test if the neck turning is done prior to weight segregation. At this point, however, we have done a lot of work.

So, looking back on the last article, which was segregating by neck wall thickness variations, here’s what I think: If most of your shooting is under 300 yards, go with neck-wall thickness. If you’re covering more real estate, I’d suggest sorting by weight. No doubt, a combination is the ultimate.

Since I focus on concentricity both before and after bullet seating, I can’t say any weight-segregated cases have outperformed my concentricity-selected ammo at 600 yards. I also know, from experience, that the cases I favor are demonstrably low in weight variation. For me, segregating by wall thickness makes more sense. I use the same brand/lot for 200, 300, and 600 yards; the difference is the load. I am pretty much looking for a good, better, best to coincide with my needs for accuracy at 200, 300, and 600 yards.

This might sound contradictory, but it seems that when firing on targets at short range, where weather conditions aren’t overly influential and bullet limits are not nearly being approached, it’s superior concentricity that prints the best groups. Further on down the pike, though, concentricity is important, certainly and always, but it’s really the consistency of bullet velocities that gets “10s.” A good long-range shooter (who can keep a handle on condition-influenced corrections) will lose more points to elevation shots than to wind. High-low shots are, for a Master or High Master, pretty much the fault of the ammo. The reason velocity deviations are just not that important to short-range groups is solely a time-of-flight answer. The longer a bullet is in the air, and the slower it’s moving, the farther and farther it flies, the more initial velocity consistency factors in.

The preceding is specially-adapted from material in the forthcoming book “Top Grade Ammo” coming (very soon) from Zediker Publishing. Check BuyZedikerBooks.com and ZedikerPublishing.com for more.

Midsouth Shooters Crawfish Cup Part 3: The Competition

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestyoutube

It’s Match Day at the 2016 Crawfish Cup, and the air is filled with morning haze, a few mosquitoes, and palpable anticipation!

87 Competitors took to the range on the day of the competition. The shooters gathered under the pavilion for the competitor meeting, where it was announced that the official referees from the NRA would provide practiced eyes on the competition. Also in attendance was Damien Orsinger, the region’s NRA representative, whom we were thrilled to see.

Damien

With these exciting developments relayed to the competitors, the final range rules were given, and they dispersed into their 8 person squads to begin their assigned event: The Mover, the Barricade, the Falling Plates, and the Practical Event.

If you’re like us, you may have a slight knowledge of what each event entails.  The Falling Plates are pretty self explanatory. Each competitor lines up at 10 yards, and must shoot a series of 6 plates within a specified amount of seconds. The difficulty increases with distance, all the way out to 25 yards. You saw in Part 2. It’s not as easy as it looks.

The Barricade presents even more challenges as the competitors must set themselves behind a partition, without eyes on the target. The buzzer sounds, the target turns to face the competitor as he or she leans out from the barricade to take their shot. This must be done within seconds, from varying distances, and using alternating hands. Imagine coming out from behind a wall 35 yards from your target, drawing your gun, gaining your sight picture, and firing from your non-dominant hand, all within a matter of seconds. Yes, it sounds impossible.

The Practical Event shares some commonalities with the Barricade. Competitors line up to face a target which is turned away from them. They must fire a series of shots within a few seconds, and at varying distances. From here, the two events begin to differ wildly. The shots taken are within quick succession. For instance, one must place one shot in each target within three seconds, two shots in each target within four seconds, and three shots in each target eight seconds. Oh, did we mention there’s two targets! Yea, two targets. It only gets more difficult from here, as the amount of shots, total time to take the shots, and the distance changes dramatically. In the end, a competitor must make their final shots in two targets, three in each, at 50 YARDS! Hey, at least you can go prone. I know I would have to lie down, and I probably would just stay there.

Finally we have the Moving Targets Event, or the Mover. The shooters take on this event solo. A hush falls, the mover hums to life, and a target races across the berm. All the while, the shooter waits for movement, draws, and fires a number of shot before the target reaches the opposite side from which it started. Draw, lead, and squeeze. Now, back out a few yards. Fewer shots, same amount of time, about 6 seconds. Go further back now. Again. Now, you’re at 25 yards. You have to hit this target three times with each pass. It passes you 4 times at this distance. At 25 yards, that black circle you’re aiming for, is little more than a dot, even with your red dot, stick shift, years of training, practice yesterday, and anxiety under control, trying to compensate for each shot within a few seconds separates competitors from champions.

Even with a perfect score, you’re not guaranteed a win. The top competitors are trying to get as many X’s as possible. An X is a shot within the inner-most circle. Hit there, and you’re set. Get more shots within the “big” black dot, and the cup has a better chance of going home in your luggage.

Check out the gallery below, and see these true competitors hard at work in their sport.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It was unlike anything we’d ever witnessed. The blend of speed, skill, accuracy, and precision culminated in a dramatic and inspiring performance from every competitor, whether they were a novice, or a world class professional. Each shooter stood tall, took aim, and gave it their absolute best on the firing line.

From Range Master George Mowbray, “The 2016 Crawfish Cup turned into a shootout amongst the elite competitors of the sport! The Open Gun Super Squad was comprised of last year’s winner, Bruce Piatt, 2014 winner Kevin Angstadt, 2013 winner Doug Koenig and challengers Mark Itzstein, Kim Beckwith, Troy Mattheyer, Jeremy  Newell and first time Crawfish Cup competitor Tony Holmes.”

George detailed how the drama unfolded throughout the day in his match narrative. He said, “Kevin Angstadt jumped out to an early lead in the TK Custom sponsored Practical Event, posting an impressive 480 points with 45 tie-breaking X-ring shots. Bruce Piatt also had a 480 on the Practical Event, but with 39 X’s. Troy Mattheyer was in third place with a clean score and 37 X’s. Mark Itzstein and Tony Holmes followed with 36 and 32 X-ring hits respectively. 2013 champion Doug Koenig had a high X-count of 44 on the Practical, but let one shot slip out of the ten-point ring, ending the event with 478 points. Still an impressive start to the match, nonetheless.”

“Next up for the top squad was the Briley Custom Barricade event. Typically, it is a high X-count event for the top Open Gun competitors, and today didn’t disappoint. Caspian’s Bruce Piatt and Mark Itzstein, sponsored by Secure Firearm Products, posted perfect scores of 480 points with a perfect 48 X’s on the event. This was a personal best for Itzstein and his first 48-X Barricade Event in competition and propelled him past Troy Mattheyer and into third place behind Midsouth Shooters Angstadt, who still led with 91 X’s and Piatt with 87 X’s.”

George continued, “Next came the Falling Plates, which was sponsored by Lucas Oil Outdoor Line. All of the squad easily cleaned the event with 480-48X scores. Going into the final event, it was a tight race with Midsouth’s Kevin Angstadt clinging to the lead he established at the outset with a total score of 1440-139X, to Piatt’s 1440-135X. Itzstein, Mattheyer and Holmes rounded out the top five with X-counts of 132, 129 and 123 respectively. As is usually the case at the Bianchi Cup National Action Pistol Championship.”

“The drama peaked when the four greats met for their final event of the day, the Moving Target, sponsored by Secure Firearm Products. The new state-of-the-art Mover raced targets before Bruce Piatt, Tony Holmes, Doug Koenig, and Kevin Angstadt. Tied in Falling Plates, X’s gathered in both Barricade and Practical, the Mover began to separate our champions into their positions. The slightest misstep, hesitation, or distraction could equal defeat. In the end, one champion rose above the others to take the day.”

“When the final shot rang out, Bruce Piatt repeated as the 2016 Crawfish Cup Champion with a score of 1920 points and 176 X’s. Tony Holmes jumped into second place by shooting a 478 on the Mover, finishing with a 1918-153X. Smith & Wesson’s Doug Koenig also had 176 X’s, but dropped 4 points overall to finish with a 1916-176X. Kevin Angstadt was close on his heels firing a 1916 with 173 X’s. Mark Itzstein also shot a 1916, but could only muster 158 X’s to finish in fifth place. Troy Mattheyer shot an eight point shot and a five point shot on the Mover to finish with a very respectable 1913-157X performance. The top three competitors, Piatt, Holmes and Koenig, are all sponsored by H & M Black Nitride giving Black Nitride a clean sweep at the Crawfish Cup.” Check out the press release from Black Nitride Here!

The-Cup

Check out Part 4 for more scores, match details, and plans for 2017!

The reloading blog where you can find articles, tips, industry news, gear reviews, and more!