Tag Archives: ammo

HUNTING: .300 AAC Blackout for Deer?

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This is a big question around the whitetail woods: how well can the AR-15 serve as a viable hunting rifle when chambered for this round? Here’s one answer… Read on!

300 blackout

SOURCE: NRA Publications, American Hunter
by Philip Massaro

The AR-15 platform has been modified and fiddled with for quite a while, and has its own series of cartridges designed specifically to function within the parameters of the rifle. The 6.8 SPC, the .458 SOCOM, the .50 Beowulf — all were built to give the AR-15 a different level of performance than the standard 5.56 NATO/.223 Rem.

There is also no doubt that .30-caliber cartridges are, have been, and probably will remain America’s favorite. So many cartridges have been modified to hold .30-caliber bullets that I have almost lost count. The .300 AAC Blackout is the cartridge built to function in the AR-15 platform, and with its design comes a different mindset, as the cartridge is called upon to fill a special role.

As a hunting cartridge, the .300 BLK certainly doesn’t look like one of the usual suspects: it is a stubby little guy, definitely lacking the look of a long-range cartridge. That’s fine, because the Blackout was never designed to fulfill that role. Perhaps a bit of history is warranted:

The Blackout’s roots are spread in the soil of the U.S. Military, which was looking for a round that would give better sub-sonic capabilities than their suppressed 9mm carbines, especially for close-in work. With some modification of a wildcat cartridge — namely the .300 Whisper — the .300 Blackout was delivered by Advanced Armament Corporation. The case itself can trace its roots all way back to the .222 Rem., through the .221 Fireball case also formed from that platform. It was designed to fit in a standard 5.56mm AR-15 magazine in double-stack configuration, yet use the long 220-grain .308 caliber bullets for subsonic performance. The Blackout did just that — pushing those 220-grain slugs at 1010 fps — but also did very well with the lighter bullets. That short case will push 125- and 130-grain bullets to a muzzle velocity of around 2200 fps — certainly no speed demon, but enough to get the job done on military targets. It functions perfectly through the AR platform, with one caveat: any ammunition that uses the sleeker-ogive bullets will actually chamber in the .223/5.56mm rifles, and that can pose one helluva problem should the ammo be confused. Please keep them separated!

In the the deer woods, the .300 AAC is an acceptable choice. If ranges are kept around 100 yards — much like the .30/30 WCF — things should go right for you. Were I using a Blackout on a deer hunt, I’d most definitely choose a premium hunting bullet in the 125- to 135-grain range, as they’ll produce the proper terminal ballistics. Those heavy 220-grain slugs are simply moving too slowly to give reliable expansion, and will more than likely whistle on through like a solid, resulting in a wounded or lost animal. No one wants that.

AAC deer rounds
Author believes that, loaded with a suitable bullet, the .300 Blackout is suitable for use as an effective deer cartridge, as much so as are others with similar ballistics, such as .30/30 WCF.

Ammunition choices are pretty broad now. As said, you’ll want to keep your hunting distances within reason, and choose a bullet that will expand reliably at the furthest distance you expect to take an animal with the Blackout — the range where that bullet will slow down. I’m not one of those who gets hung up on energy figures — where the commonly accepted figure of 1,000 ft.-lbs. to kill a deer came from, I don’t know — but you definitely need reliable expansion in order to kill effectively. Looking at just a few, Hornady loads the 135-grain FTX bullet at a muzzle velocity of 2,085 fps, and this will make a great hunting round. They also load their 110-grain GMX — an all-copper, polymer-tipped bullet — that will also get the job done well, again, providing you use it within reasonable ranges. Barnes builds their VOR-TX Blackout ammo around the 120-grain monometal TAC-TX bullet; Barnes worked very hard to deliver a bullet that is plenty accurate and yet gives good expansion and penetration.

The whitetail deer has suffered from guinea-pig status; I know hunters who seriously use calibers ranging from .17 Rem. all the way up to the .450 No.2 Nitro Express to make their venison, with varying levels of success. The whitetail is so prolific that, like feral hogs, sportsman tend to experiment with varying calibers and bullet weights. A good bullet, like that GMX or TAC-TX, at the lighter .30-caliber weights, will get the job done, and that’s been pretty well proven. Considering the Blackout’s trajectory, you’ll want to limit the range to 100 or 125 yards. To obtain a 200-yard zero with the Hornady FTX load, you’ll need to be 5 inches high at 100, which is a bit drastic. Perhaps a 100-yard zero, or 1 inch high at 100, where you’d be in vitals at 125 yards, makes more sense.

So, is the Blackout the perfect deer cartridge? It’s no .308 Win., but I that within 100 yards it’s a better choice than any .22-caliber centerfire. The choice is up to you, but if I were handed an accurate Blackout for a hunt in the northeast woods, I wouldn’t hesitate to use it, provided it was loaded with a good, sensible bullet.

Check out AAC choices at Midsouth HERE

New Hornady Products for 2018

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Hornady has just announced their new products for 2018, from the much anticipated new reloading tools, to innovations in ammo and projectiles, Midsouth is eager to fill our shelves with their new offerings! Read on for a brief breakdown of what’s coming soon!

New in Reloading:

Cordless Vibratory Powder Trickler:

Some cool tools are on their way from Hornady MFG., like this Vibratory Trickler, which makes “quick work of various reloading chores!”

The Vibratory Trickler, powered by two AAA batteries, features variable settings to trickle all kinds of powders, ensuring the precise amount for each charge. Its modular design means you can use it with or without the base and also makes cleanup quick and easy.

Featuring:

  • Trickles all powders
  • Light-up LED screen
  • High, low, and variable trickle settings
  • Use in base or outside of base
  • Weighted for stability
  • No-slip base

Hornady Rotary Case Tumbler:

hornady rotary case tumbler

Clean and polish brass cartridge cases to a brilliant shine with the rotary action of this tumbler, coupled with its steel pin tumbling media (included). Use in conjunction with Hornady® One Shot® Sonic Clean Solution.

Six-liter drum holds 5 pounds of brass cases. Set tumbler to run for up to eight hours in half-hour increments using the digital timer.

Check out all the new items coming to our reloading category by clicking here!

New Projectiles:

Speaking of reloading, lets take a look at some of the new projectiles being developed by Hornady!

hornady dgx bonded bullets

DGX Bonded®

The DGX® Bonded (Dangerous Game™ eXpanding) bullet features a copper-clad steel jacket bonded to a lead core to provide limited, controlled expansion with deep penetration and high weight retention. Bonding the jacket to the core prevents separation from high-energy impact on tough material like bone, ensuring the bullet stays together for deep expansion.

DGX® Bonded bullets are built to the same profile as the corresponding DGS® (Dangerous Game™ Solid) bullets but expand to 1½ to 2 times their bullet diameter.

Thicker Jacket

The thicker 0.098” copper-clad steel jacket of DGX Bonded sets it apart from other dangerous game bullets, allowing it to tear through tough material like hide, muscle and bone.

Controlled Expansion

DGX Bonded features a flat nose with serrated sections to deliver a uniform expansion from 100 to 150 yards and straight penetration, reducing possible deflections.

Bonded Jacket and Core

The bonding process locks the jacket and lead core together, improving the retained weight of the expanded bullet.

ELD-X and ELD Match Bullets:

eld-x hornady bullets

There’s also a few new calibers coming to the ELD-X line of projectiles. The Extremely Low Drag – eXpanding bullets are a technologically advanced, match accurate, ALL-RANGE hunting bullet featuring highest-in-class ballistic coefficients and consistent, controlled expansion at ALL practical hunting distances. You can find them right here at Midsouth!

New Ammunition:

There’s some interesting complete cartridges coming out this next year, and a few to really examine will be the subsonic line, the 6.5 PRC, and the new line of .223 ammo called Frontier®

New 6.5 PRC

The Ultimate Trophy Magnet

The name says it all! The 6.5 Precision Rifle Cartridge was designed to achieve the highest levels of accuracy, flat trajectory and extended range performance in a sensibly designed compact package.

The name says it all! The 6.5 Precision Rifle Cartridge was designed to achieve the highest levels of accuracy, flat trajectory and extended range performance in a sensibly designed compact package.

Utilizing moderate powder charges that result in repeatable accuracy, low recoil and reasonable barrel life, the 6.5 PRC produces high velocities for target shooting with performance well beyond 1000 yards.

Rifle makers currently chambering the 6.5 PRC include GA Precision, Gunwerks, PROOF Research, Stuteville Precision and Seekins Precision. Check back often as additional gun manufacturers confirm chambering the 6.5 PRC.

There’s a lot more to cover, and information is still coming in daily on the new products announced for next year. Stay tuned for a more in depth look at these items as we get a chance to demo them.

REVIEW: A Long-Range Story: Hornady 4DOF Ballistics Calculator

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Here’s a new ballistics calculator that takes four important ballistic factors into account, not just BC, to provide radically more precise calculated bullet flight figures. Here’s how it works…

4DOF

by Richard Mann

The new Hornady 4DOF ballistics calculator is so precise because it combines what Hornady calls the Four Degrees of Freedom. In other words, it takes into account windage, elevation, range, and angle of attack to generate a drag coefficient.

4 DOF

Recently, a few magazine editors visited for a week. Egos were on display and opinions were as thick as brass on the range at Gunsite Academy. The purpose of this get-together was to test about two dozen rifles, some purpose-built for connecting at extended distances. I have access to a 1,700-yard range and we spent the day there. My 17-year-old son, Bat, served as the official “range rat.”

After our 500-yard testing was complete, I told my associates I needed to get the DOPE (data of previous engagement) on my son’s African rifle. This would save a trip back to the range and give him some time behind the gun as payment for the support role he’d been filling.

The previous evening we had chronographed the Hornady Precision Hunter ELD-X load for the 6.5 Creedmoor my son would be using. That velocity, along with the bullet and related specifics were entered into Hornady’s 4DOF ballistic calculator, which is available online. I’d printed the results and our goal was to confirm elevation come-ups out to 500 yards. Amazingly, this was done with 5 shots; my son connected center target at 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 yards. The data generated by the Hornady 4DOF calculator was spot-on.

Bat was having fun and shooting well, and since he now had the attention of the visiting editors, I figured, what the heck, he might as well try 700 yards. His first shot at 700 was about 2 inches high so he made a .25-MOA correction and fired again. Center hit! Now he really had their attention.

The next farthest target was at what I was told was 1,100 yards, and Bat asked if he could take a poke. I was skeptical and worried he’d blow the impression he’d already made on these experts, but figured the boy deserved a chance. The Hornady 4DOF ballistics calculator data called for a 38.25-MOA adjustment at 1,100 yards. I got on the spotting scope and told him, “Send it.” He did, and he missed high, by what appeared to be several feet.

I Instructed Bat to walk the reticle in the Bushnell 2.5-10X Engage riflescope — yes, this was a 10X riflescope — down 1 MOA at a time. At 3 MOA below center, I called the shot just left. (Wind is a terrible thing at 1,100 yards.) My instructions were to keep the same elevation hold but to also hold 2 MOA off the right edge. He pulled the trigger six times and achieved six hits. The onlookers were stunned, I however, was confused.

With the 4 DOF calculator from Hornady you can input your data and go to the range with total confidence it will be precise. Of course, remember, garbage in, garbage out. You have to input the right information.

4DOF printout

How could the Hornady 4DOF ballistics calculator data be so correct out to 700 yards and be off so much at 1,100? A range finder and a return to the Hornady 4DOF ballistics calculator answered the question. Instead of 1,100 yards, the target was at 1,048 yards. Resetting the Hornady 4DOF calculator to display come-ups in increments of 10 yards, it showed the proper correction for that distance to be 35.25 MOA. With our original 38.25-MOA correction we were 3 MOA or about 33 inches high. Had we known the correct range to the target, the 4DOF-generated data would have allowed for an easy first or, since we had a bit of wind, second-round hit.

What makes all this possible is the math and mechanics behind the Hornady 4DOF ballistics calculator system. Its four degrees of freedom, taking into account windage, elevation, range, and angle of attack, allow trajectory solutions to be calculated with a drag coefficient instead of a ballistic coefficient (BC). It’s also the first publicly available ballistics calculator capable of determining the accurate vertical shift a bullet experiences as it encounters a crosswind, which is known as aerodynamic jump.

By using Doppler radar and actually shooting bullets, Hornady calculates the exact drag curve for every projectile in the 4DOF Bullet Library. (Currently there are more than 100 projectiles from Hornady, Lapua, Berger and Sierra.) BC can change as velocity changes, a drag curve doesn’t. Explained simply, instead of using BC, which gives you a snapshot of a bullet at various distances; Hornady has created a video of the bullet’s flight. This allows the 4DOF calculator to predict drop with perfection at any distance, every time.

The takeaway from all this — the one that’ll matter to you and your ammo — is that the Hornady 4DOF ballistic calculator is extraordinarily precise. Taking data this exact to the field on a first try is as rare as 17-year-old boys who can hit at 1,100 yards, six times in a row.

Check it out HERE

Download the app HERE for iOS

Download the app HERE for Android

John Vlieger Reviews Hornady HAP 9mm

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By John Vlieger:

The HAP (Hornady Action Pistol) bullet is the renowned XTP jacketed hollow point without the grooves cut into the jacket, simplifying the manufacturing process. What you end up with is an accurate,  consistent, and economically priced jacketed bullet. Reloading data is available for this bullet from multiple manufacturers, there’s no coating to shave off or exposed lead to worry about, and it doesn’t break the bank when you want to buy in bulk. In the video below I put the HAP 9mm bullets up against a few steel targets, and give you some more info. The sound on the video is a little muffled, due to a windy day at the range.

I load and shoot over 20,000 rounds of ammunition a year, so when I’m shopping for loading components, the main things I look for are economy, ease of use, and consistency. The Hornady 115 grain HAP bullet meets all of those requirements and more for competition and target shooting. 115 grain bullets are an industry standard for 9mm and most guns should be able to run them right out of the box, so using it as a go to bullet weight makes a lot of sense.

Midsouth now exclusively has the Hornady 9mm HAP bullets at plated bullet prices. Click Here to head over, load your own, and put them to the test!

Priced for Plinkers, Built for Pros!

The Bullet-Cam, a Whole New Perspective in Shooting

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Just watch the video below. Turn on the sound, and gape in amazement at what technology has brought forth.

Now, how do you feel about this advancement? What questions do you have for Hornady or Vortex? How will the VIP Warranty work for an optic which is strapped to the end of a tiny missile?

Comments on their respective social media platforms field many of these mind boggling questions. Apparently, the warranty expires once the bullet leaves the barrel. The camera is suspended in a gel similar to that of the human eye. The camera is powered by positive thinking, just like Tony Robbins. Most importantly, you can live stream to Facebook, because Facebook would LOVE this…Right?

This is truly one of my favorite days every year. I’m a self proclaimed gullible goof, so this one got me right in the gut. I literally turned to one of our purchasers and exclaimed, “Why are these not on the website yet???” Needless to say, I’ve earned a new nickname around the office…

Thanks Hornady, and Vortex for playing along. I’m off to track down the Boggy Creek Monster on the back of a unicorn.

Ultimate Reloader: New 6.5 Creedmoor Ammunition from Norma

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Gavin Gear, Ultimate Reloader:

Norma is known for their high quality brass and ammunition, I’ve used Norma brass for precision reloading in calibers like .30-06 with great results. Recently, I saw that Norma had announced a new addition to their Professional Hunter lineup of ammunition: in 6.5 Creedmoor! I thought I should try some out with the Ruger Precision Rifle, and that’s what I’ll cover in this post.

As you saw in the video, this ammunition behaves more like match ammunition than it does hunting ammunition- I really wish it was deer season! Here’s the chronograph results:

With an SD of 13.7 FPS, this ammunition is very consistent in terms of velocity. It’s not surprising that the first four shots went into a .5″ group. This new ammunition is built around the Swift Scirocco II 6.5mm Bullet, and here’s more info about this precision-oriented hunting projectile:

Technical Information

  • Caliber: 264, 6.5mm
  • Bullet Diameter: 0.264
  • Bullet Weight: 130 Grains
  • Bullet Length: 1.350″
  • Bullet Style: Polymer Tip Spitzer Boat Tail
  • Bullet Coating: Non-Coated

Ballistics Information:

  • Sectional Density: .266
  • Ballistic Coefficient:.571

This is certainly a great choice of ammunition if you are hunting medium game with a rifle chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor. I do hope to show more 6.5 Creedmoor rifles here on Ultimate Reloader chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor- stay tuned!

It’s always good to feel the sharp recoil of the Ruger Precision Rifle against my shoulder, and to smell the burnt gunpowder in the air. Can’t wait to sit down again with this ammunition to see if I can get that 3/8″ 5-shot group I know this ammo is capable of! If you are looking for this new 6.5 Creedmoor Professional Hunter ammunition, Midsouth Shooters Supply has it!

Have you been shooting Norma Professional Hunter ammunition? If so, please share your experiences!

Thanks,
Gavin

Check out the Ultimate Reloader site HERE for more reviews, how-to’s, and much more!

Ultimate Reloader: When Reloading Goes Wrong

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From Ultimate Reloader : by Gavin Gear

When Reloading Goes Wrong: Hornady Cam Lock Bullet Puller

I’m going to load a bunch of 9mm today! That was my plan, and I couldn’t wait to go shoot a bunch of the ammo with my Glock 17. Everything was going “great” until I noticed the powder level seemed to be getting higher as I was loading. “That just doesn’t look right” I thought. I took a charged case off the press, and soon determined I was 2.2 grains over my 9mm load- way too far over to risk shooting. I won’t repeat what I said right then: something like @$#&. In disgust, I put the ammo aside in a tub with a sheet of paper laid inside with a Sharpie scrawl that read “Over, not safe”. I didn’t even want to think about breaking down 500 rounds of ammunition with my impact puller. That would probably take (:30 per cartridge X 500 cartridges = 250 minutes = ~4 hours and 15 minutes!). Later I decided it would be a good time to get a press-mounted collet puller. Hopefully that would save some time! Fast-forward a year later and I’m finally getting around to fixing this 9mm ammo. Feels good to take care of this pile of unsafe ammo.

As you saw in the video, this tool is pretty simple, but it’s magic when you need to pull a large quantity of bullets. I wouldn’t attempt this kind of job without such a tool! Here’s a look inside the die opening where the collet sits:

pulled down ammo using hornady cam lock bullet puller
The stages and components of pulled-down ammo.

Also pictured above: a “bad” cartridge before the bullet was pulled, the case, powder, and bullet after pulling (note the slightest ring from the taper crimp previously applied). I feel great about reusing these bullets for anything but a bullseye match- I don’t think the crimp groove or any of the “scratches” will affect the re-reloaded ammunition’s performance for most types of pistol shooting.

Here’s the parts and pieces for a typical Hornady Cam Lock Bullet Puller setup:

The components of the Hornady Cam Lock bullet puller
The components of the Hornady Cam Lock bullet puller

Pictured here:

  1. Cam Lock die body
  2. Cam lever
  3. Stem
  4. #9 collet – .338″ – .358″ range (9mm jacketed bullets measure .355″)

In order to use this tool, you’ll need the appropriate collet for each diameter range of bullets you intend to pull. From the Hornady Accessories Catalog:

cam lock bullet puller chart

You can find the Hornady Cam Lock Bullet Puller HERE at Midsouth Shooters Supply (click here for collets).

This puller worked great for me for the ~500 9mm cartridges that I had to tear-down and re-reload. I’m going to order more collets as the need arises, because I really like the way this tool works. Almost makes the process fun! If you’re looking to pull bulk bullets, check out this tool!

Thanks,
Gavin

Progressive Press Tricks

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Progressive reloading presses are amazing and efficient ammo-creating machines, and they’re not just for pistols! Here’s a few tips on getting the most from yours. You can find the Hornady Lock-N-Load Progressive Press at Midsouth Shooters by Clicking Here!


Glen Zediker


A “progressive” press is a wondrous thing.

This is a machine (only word that fits) that progresses through loading operation stations via a rotating shell plate (well, most rotate, but some commercially-oriented units move straight-line). This plate incorporates a ratcheting mechanism that indexes a cartridge case into alignment with the next tool station with each cycle of the press handle (some require manual index-advancement of the plate, but most can be had as “automatic”). Another case is added with each stroke, as is another bullet at that station, so after the plate has been filled with cases, a loaded round is ejected and an empty case is added each cycle, with each stroke of the press handle.

It’s a compact-sized bench-mounted ammo assembly line.

hornady progressive
It’s not right at all to call a progressive an “automated turret.” Turrets have a head that moves; progressives have a shell-holding plate that moves. And, there are other operations embodied in a good progressive design that simply cannot be replicated with an auto-indexing turret.

In a progressive, each operation — case sizing, priming, propellant dispensing, bullet seating, and even more — is supplied by a toolhead that has four or more tool-containing bodies corresponding to the openings on the shell plate. Priming is accomplished via a primer dispenser, which is usually a tube containing primers coupled with an means to locate each primer such that it will be seated on the handle upstroke (shell plate coming down); almost always, this is coincidental with full-length sizing. The propellant dispenser form varies, but is another automated process that is linked (literally) to the press handle stroke.

Progressive loading machines are complex, but they can be well-conceived, well-made appliances that perform reliably. Results are largely up to the operator. More about that in a bit.

The cost and complexity of a progressive (related) primarily reflect its level of automation. A “basic” progressive requires the operator to manually position an empty case at the first station, manually advance the shell plate, and place a bullet in each case mouth. The more complex, and costly, machines have case and bullet feeders, and warning systems that give notice of diminishing components.

Keep a close watch on supply levels! The efficiency of a good progressive can warp time… Running one of the “big” progressives I am always surprised how quickly the primer supply and powder meter hopper empty.

Keep the machine clean and lubricated. This eliminates most function issues. Think about what’s going on here and it’s easy to see that a well-maintained machine will be a reliable and consistent machine. Remember that all operations revolve around the revolution of the shell plate. Keep it clean and lubed appropriately.

Mount a progressive securely on a rigid base. There is a lot (a lot) of pressure and stress involved in cycling a progressive, especially a “big” one. Again, think about what’s going on, how many duties are being processed each stroke, and consider those processes, and it’s clear that this big bad boy best be fastened down. It’s noticeably easier to operate a progressive when it’s mounted rigidly. Some progressives seat the primer on the press handle upstroke, some on the downstroke (most are on the upstroke). A rigidly-mounted press adds to the feel of this operation.

Get “good” dies. Most progressives, and certainly the popular machines, can accommodate any 7/8-14 threaded die. Feel free, and encouraged, to use the “better” sizing and seating dies, just as you might for a single-stage press.

Incorporate a good quality powder meter (something with a 7/8-14 attachment means). This can be done via a “conversion kit,” if the machine isn’t already outfitted with linkage that will cycle the powder meter operating handle. Makes a huge difference here, just as it does regardless of press type.

Address primer pockets. The priming operation inherent in a progressive doesn’t provide the feel of a bench-mounted or hand-operated tool. That’s not a problem at all if the primers are being seated fully using a progressive. To help ensure that they do, I think it’s wise to run a pocket uniformer. That way, the pocket will be what it should be, so the priming operation should likewise result in a well-seated primer. At the least, check each and every loaded round you get of a progressive for a high primer. Sometimes the machine needs to be adjusted, by the way, to seat primers fully.

Caveats? There are a few, not many.

I have long and often said that the big reason I don’t use a progressive for all my ammunition is because I really never get to see one run. By that I mean the increased ease and speed potential of a progressive is wasted on me because of my loading habits. It all stops, dead in its tracks, with case preparation steps, which includes the steps themselves and maybe even more the order in which I do them. Once I get my case prep work done, actually loading each round comes down to dispensing a propellant charge, putting a bullet into the case mouth, and running it up into a bullet seating die. I can do that rapidly. However! And here’s the hold up, before I get a cartridge case to that point, I have to do all the sizing operations on it. A bigger-scale progressive would give me the means to size each case fully, which is body, neck, and then neck inside, so there’s an extra operation (the inside neck sizing). Again, if there’s a threaded hole for a die and a station point underneath that, it could work for me. But if I have to do the sizing and then, say, trimming, everything breaks down, and slows down.

I’ve been most wrongfully accused of knocking progressives. Not even a little bit am I doing that. The closer your starting point (sizing a clean case) is to your ending point (seating a bullet) the better a progressive will reward you. That’s all’s I’m saying.

Hornady Progressive Press
Progressive reloading presses are not at all just for straight-wall pistol cases. High-quality, precisely-constructed ammo can be produced on a progressive. Just need the right tooling and the right approaches. A “big” progressive, like this Hornady, can handle virtually any cartridge.

You will find, and it will be a natural evolution of your approach, that there is larger volume preparation work done for progressives. All I intend to suggest in that is that, as round-count volume increases, so too will round-count preparation. When I use a progressive I tend to “save up” empties and run bigger batches. Ways you might find to improve handling larger quantities is to split up bench sessions for decapping, cleaning, trimming, applying lube (even though I don’t think they work all that well, the spray-on lubes work easiest for prepping large quantities of cases), or whatever else you do prior to announcing a case is fit for a reload. I really think you should decap cases prior to running them on a progressive. Keep the press as clean as you can. Primer grit residue doesn’t help. Pay special attention to the keeping the priming station area clean.

decapping die
I strongly recommend using a decapping die prior to placing the cases on the shellplate. There’s a lot of grit otherwise that’s getting onto the mechanism. Pay particular attention to progressive priming parts: be watchful for any debris that could conceivably detonate a primer; that could be catastrophic.

The preceding was adapted from Glen Zediker’s newest book, Top-Grade Ammo, now available! Visit ZedkerPublishing.com or BuyZedikerBooks.com for more information. 

Can a Go-Pro Save Your Life?

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We have to say, we’re pretty shocked at the results! 22plinkster is back at the range, testing out his Franken-pistol once again, on a Go-Pro Hero 4. Check out the video below:

Did you know you’re more likely to be hit with a 22LR projectile, than any other caliber of bullet?

Just Announced! New Hornady 2017 Products

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Christmas came early for those of us who follow Hornady, with their announcement of new products to expect in 2017. Let’s kick things off with the product launch video. Just a head’s up, it’s a beefy video, with tons of products listed, so if you want to break it down into multiple parts, then Click Here.

WOW! Here’s a few of the big takeaways we’re excited about…

Reloading-

Case Prep Duo:

Let’s start with the Case Prep Duo. Chamfering and deburring will be afar easier process with this handy little tool, with handy being the operative word. The swivel handle allows what is essentially a powered hand drill, to turn into a table top case prep station, stabilized by two rubber feet.

The Hornady case prep duo

Lock-N-Load® AP Tool Caddy:

Keep your commonly used reloading hand tools in easy reach with the L-N-L Tool Caddy. Swivel the arm to accommodate a righty or a lefty, then fill the arm with whatever tools you need to keep you focused on the task at hand.

the lock n load ap tool caddy

Ammunition-

America’s gun runs on black

Best said by Neil Davies, Hornady Marketing Director, “Without a doubt, black guns are the most popular firearms in America right now…” Hornady took this fact to heart, and began to make ammunition which would optimize the performance of America’s favorite guns. “Loaded with legendary Hornady® bullets, Hornady BLACK™ ammunition is designed to fit, feed and function in a variety of platforms. Direct impingement, gas piston, suppressed, unsuppressed, inertia, bolt, pump, supersonic, subsonic, rifle, mid-length, carbine or pistol – Hornady BLACK™ ammunition delivers superior performance for a variety of applications. Made in the USA.”

Hornady Black Ammo

Click Here for a full list of the offered ammo.

Bench Necessities-

Hornady® Reloading Handbook: 10th Edition:

One of the most valuable tools to any reloader, is knowledge, and what better way than with over 1,000 pages of well over 1,300 loads, including some new ones, like the 280 Ackley Improved, 7×64 Brenneke and the 338 Federal.

the new hornady reloading manual 10th edition

We’ll be reporting, in-depth, on the multitude of new Hornady products hitting the shelves soon, as well as a timeline as to when you can expect them to appear for purchase at Midsouth Shooters Supply. Stay Tuned!

Did you watch the whole video? Was there a product mentioned you’d like more info about? Let us know in the comments!