Tag Archives: Nosler

RELOADERS CORNER: 4 (More) Semi-Auto Details

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Beyond precision and accuracy, the base goal for any handload is safety: follow these recommendations to ensure yours! KEEP READING

Glen Zediker

Since I sincerely think it’s important to know what you’re up against, in one way of looking at it, when you load for a semi-automatic rifle, there’s more this time. I don’t mean to say “up against” like it’s some sort of adversarial relationship, a fight, but not respecting some of these points can create problems.

The gas port pressure issue was addressed last time, and it’s one of the most influential. Not only does too much port pressure create excessive action cycling, it also shortens case life. The cases take a bigger beating, more expansion mostly, when the bolt tries to unlock too quickly. Clearly, I’m back to using the AR15 as the central example, but virtually all semis succumb to the same set of behaviors (yes, including the gas-piston guns).

nosler brass
My current choice in a go-to for my “better” AR15 brass is Nosler. It’s not exactly thin but it is tough, and, by my experience, holds up to my standard. It’s also ready to load (well prepped).

One: tough brass
Therefore, next on the list is choosing a tough case! Tough, here, means “hard.” Brass is an alloy and the makeup varies from maker to maker.

The reason that a harder composition helps is because it’s more resistant to expansion, not as elastic. That might sound, on the front end, like a bad thing because harder brass is also more brittle so could tend to succumb easier to the ills of excessive expansion. Softer brass will conform more agreeably. True. It might seem like an equitable trade off, but I assure you that it is hardness ultimately that matters most. I notice the softness mostly in primer pocket expansion, or I should say that harder cases don’t open up as quickly.

Thicker cases, by the way, are not necessarily harder. Again, that’s in the alloy composition itself. Some high-dollar cases, Lapua for instance, are relatively soft despite being thick-walled.

The overall best choice for reuse in a semi-auto is probably good old Lake City. It’s exactly what it should be, and that’s been pretty well proven for decades. LC is easily available but, except in rare circumstances, will be once-fired. Most cases left over from commercially-available NATO-spec loadings are likewise fine. Lake City, as a bonus, also tends to be relatively thinner-walled (higher capacity) than many of the commercial brands, and its quality (wall thickness) is pretty dang good.

Check out what Midsouth has HERE

 

Two: adequate case shoulder set-back
Next, and this is a huge source of debate and disagreement amongst my readers, but, since now I’m strictly speaking of semi-auto needs I doubt there will be much dissent: full-length resize all cases! It’s a matter of degrees, and getting handle on port pressure (plus) taming down an excessively functioning gas system, reduces this difference: but most cases from most semi-autos will emerge with a pretty well-blown case shoulder. Make double-sure you’re sizing the cases down to at least 0.003 clearance. There are gages that help, and HERE is a link to one.

If you don’t there are safety and function problems ahead.

Three: adequate case neck “tension”
Likewise, make double-sure the case neck is being reduced an adequate amount to retain the bullet. There should be a minimum net difference of 0.003 inches between sized outside case neck diameter and loaded round outside case neck diameter. Reason: don’t take a chance of inadvertent bullet movement during the recoil and feeding cycles. That movement can be back or forward! It’s easily possible for a bullet to jump ahead when the inertia from the bolt carrier assembly chambers the next round.

sized case neck
Same as said about headspace: a bolt-action can “get away” with a lot, but a semi-auto round has to be constructed with an eye on cycling stresses. A firmly-held bullet resists stubs and intertia-induced movement. I recommend a minimum of 0.003 “grip.”

Four: tough primer!
Choose a tough primer! There’s a floating firing pin on an AR15 (M1A also) that is supposed to be held in check but that system doesn’t always work! If you load and extract a round and see a little dimple in the primer, that’s from the firing pin tapping off of it (again, created by inertia of bolt closing). A combination of a high primer and a sensitive primer cup assembly can create a “slam-fire,” which you do not want.

primer indentation
This always scares me. A tough-skinned primer is a very wise choice loading for anything with a floating firing pin, like an AR15 or AR10.
No! Check each and every primer to make sure it’s seated to below flush with the case head!

Brands? CCI has some mil-spec primers that work well, and I’ve had great success with Remington 7-1/2. Some of the well-respected “match” primers are a little thin. The CCI and Remington also hold up well to the (sometimes) greater firing forces working on the primer (again, from the quick unlocking).

And, finally, make double-sure that each and every primer is seated to below flush with the case head! That’s true for any firearm (because it also means that the primer is fully seated) but imperative for safety in a semi-auto. This is especially an issue for those who use a progressive-type loading press. There’s nothing wrong with the press but it may not give the sensitivity in feedback to know that the primer is fully seated without checking.

Here’s what I use from Midsouth

This article is adapted from Glen’s books, Handloading For Competition and Top-Grade Ammo, available at Midsouth HERE. For more information about other books by Glen, visit ZedikerPublishing.com

The RDF: Nosler’s New Reduced Drag Factor Bullet

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Nosler RDF Bullets Point is the Point***UPDATED***

Since Nosler’s press release on the new RDF™ bullets was announced, the product has been shipped to Midsouth Shooters! We looked to an independent poster for their review of the new offering, and we were more than impressed with the results.

Here’s an excerpt from the reviewer, deadnbrkn84:

Avatar
“We’ve been shooting these for the last month or so and the 70’s have been shooting extremely well and we’ve been running a BC of .211. Basically the same as the 75 Amax but you can run these a lot faster. With our 223AI’s we were running the Amax at about 3100. These are closer to 3200. They like to be run fast. I also measured a bunch and they are beyond consistent.”
He went on to add,
“I have the 6mm’s arriving any day in quantity to shoot and I will tell you they will be giving the Hybrids a run for their money. If they are anything like the 70’s (and they are the same design) the BC will blow the Hybrid away and these will cost less. I’ll keep you all posted but these will be a bullet to watch.”
You can see the difference in meplat from left to right below:
Bullet lineup comparison of hollow point bullets for the nosler RDF bullet
From left to right; Original Nosler Hollow Point, Berger VLD, Nosler RDF
The difference in meplat is definitely noticeable, reducing drag, and flattening trajectory over greater distances for each bullet. For those not in the know, Meplat (from the French word “méplat” meaning “flat”) is the technical term for the flat or open tip on the nose of a bullet. The shape of the meplat is important in determining how the bullet moves through the air.

Check out the bullets for yourself below:

22 Caliber 70 Grain Nosler RDF Bullet

Click Here to purchase the 22 Caliber RDF Bullets now!

6mm 105grain Nosler RDF Bullet

Click Here to purchase the 6mm RDF Bullets now!

6.5mm 140 Grain HPBT Nosler RDF Bullet

Click Here to purchase the 6.5mm RDF Bullets now!

30 Caliber 175 Grain HPBT Nosler RDF Bullet

Click Here to purchase the 30 Caliber RDF Bullets now!

The original article, as well as Nosler’s official press release, is below:

Nosler's New RDF Bullets

Nosler Inc. of Bend, OR, announced recently the first of several new innovative products slated to roll out over the coming weeks with the release of their new RDF™ Reduced Drag Factor bullet line. RDF™ features the highest BCs and smallest, most consistent meplats of any hollow point match bullet line on the market.

“Long-range competitive shooting has quickly become one of the fastest growing shooting activities in the world, and quality bullets are the cornerstone of the sport” said John Nosler, Executive Vice President for the company. “Our engineers were challenged with delivering a bullet that would drastically reduce aerodynamic drag and increase ballistic consistency, providing shooters with an indisputable advantage in the field. What we achieved is a leap in match bullet technology that we predict will become the winning differentiator for shooters across the country, and around the globe.”

The RDF™ line was designed from the ground up by Nosler’s world-class team of engineers with the goal of delivering exceptionally high BCs that result in the flattest trajectory and least wind drift possible. Several key design factors contribute to the RDF’s game-changing performance. Nosler’s meticulously optimized compound ogive, which bridges traditional tangent and secant bullet shapes, is insensitive to seating depth, allowing handloaders to seat bullets with ease, an advantage for competitors who often load hundreds of rounds per sitting in preparation for a match. Also lending itself to the bullet’s sleek form factor is a long, drag reducing boattail, making the product optimal for long range efficiency.

close up of the RDF Nosler BulletWhen compared side-by-side, shooters will immediately notice a striking visual contrast between Nosler’s RDF™ and today’s leading industry match bullets, with a hollow point so small it’s nearly undetectable to the naked eye. The bullet’s tightly profiled design boasts a 40% average reduction in meplat size, completely eliminating the need to point and trim tips—a laborious step performed by match shooters in order to achieve increased ballistic efficiency and an edge over the competition.

available calibers and specs on the rdf bullet from nosler

Nosler’s RDF™ bullet line will initially launch with the following offerings in both 100 and 500 count boxes:
· 22cal 70gr.—G1 Ballistic Coefficient 0.416 | G7 Ballistic Coefficient 0.211
· 6mm 105gr.—BC field verification in process
· 6.5mm 140gr.—BC field verification in process
· 30cal 175gr.—G1 Ballistic Coefficient 0.536| G7 Ballistic Coefficient 0.270

More details about RDF™ bullets can be found at www.Nosler.com

Have you tried the new Nosler RDF Bullets yet? If so, please give them a review, or tell us what you think in the comments below!

Midsouth’s Match Monster™ Bullets – by Nosler

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Welcome to the new era of exclusive projectiles at Midsouth Shooters! Introducing the Match Monster™ Bullets, made by Nosler.

Match-Monster-Bullets-by-Nosler
Exclusively at Midsouth Shooters Supply!

Experience world class accuracy with Midsouth’s Match Monster™ Lineup!

Midsouth Shooters and Nosler have unleashed a new MONSTER! Introducing the new – MATCH MONSTER! This new offering gives shooters the superior performance they demand, at a bulk savings they deserve. We put this selection together with Match shooters in mind. These, like our Varmint Nightmare and Varmint Nightmare Xtreme Bullets, are purchased in huge bulk quantities and then broken down into smaller amounts – so that you get to take advantage of bulk savings. These bullets use extremely precise lead-alloy cores that create an impressive standard for Match Monster™ bullets. The hollow point bullet provides a small meplat to reduce drag and increase aerodynamic efficiency. A pronounced boat tail design provides efficient flight characteristics over a wide range of velocities.

The Match Monsters

Match-Monster-155-Grain

 

Match-Monster-168-Grain

 

Match-Monster-168-Grain-with-Cannelure

    • 30 Caliber
    • (.308″ Diameter)
    • Hollow Point
    • Cannelure
    • Boat Tail
    • 168 Grain
    • BC = .462
    • 500 Count
    • Click Here to Shop Now

 

Match-Monster-175-Grain

 

Match-Monster-190-Grain

 

Nosler-Reloading-Manual-8

    • Nosler Reloading Manual #8 contains new load data for the Match Monster line of bullets
    • Interchangeable with Custom Competition bullets of the same caliber and grain weight.
    • Click Here to Shop Now

 

 

This is a new era of projectiles at Midsouth Shooters – look for more caliber specific bullets, diameters, and grain weights in the near future!

Monster Savings, Monster Results – Midsouth’s Match Monster Bullets!!!