Tag Archives: optics

SKILLS: Do You Need A Rifle Scope?

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To push the limits of your tactical rifle a long-range rifle scope might just be what you need, or not… READ MORE

rifle scopes
Some shooters romanticize the idea of getting a huge rifle scope so they can shoot a country mile. It is best to find balance in realistic goals for your rifle and the optic.

SOURCE: Springfield-Armory Armory Life, Adam Scepaniak

In previous articles we discussed the merits of utilizing and understanding the practicality of iron sights as well as when red dot sights can improve speed and awareness and be beneficial to those of us with less than perfect vision.

That now brings us to the topic of more conventional rifle scopes with magnification. There is a novelty in being able to push one’s shooting prowess to its limits and see exactly how far you can connect on a shot. Simultaneously, you don’t want a rifle scope on an all-purpose carbine that is so overmatched for your target that close quarter targets become unfeasible to engage.

There is a certain balance that must be achieved in magnification, weight and other ancillary features to accomplish the mission at hand. In the third part of this series on carbine sighting systems, we will now cover the pros and cons of rifle scopes on your modern sporting rifle.

Realistic Goals
With most people’s modern sporting rifles being chambered in .223 Rem/5.56mm NATO, your effective range is roughly 600 yards (without deep-diving into reloading your own ammunition and some other wizardry performed on your firearm). Understanding this is essentially the practical limit of the cartridge, you then need to ask yourself how far you are actually going to shoot.

Secondly, how close do you want to shoot? If you top off your rifle with a titan of a scope you may not be able to engage anything quickly under 100 yards. Conversely, if the magnification of your rifle scope is too weak, how comfortable are you shooting long distances with low magnification? Identifying your working range, or the distances you intend to engage targets, will lead you to what magnification your rifle scope should be.

rifle scopes
A good quality scope, such as this Vortex Strike Eagle 1-6X, can offer you close range performance as well as the ability to reach out to longer distances.

My answer to that proposed question was potentially 300 yards at a maximum and possibly 10 yards at a minimum. Sounds nearly too close and too far at the same time, right? Well, there are a bevy of rifle scope manufacturers who make optics that could amply cover that range of distance. With a rifle scope that is 1-4X, 1-6X or 1-8X, you have the ability to shoot both near and far while not adding significant weight to your weapon platform.

Real-World Applications
With a rifle scope that can be dialed down to 1X or essentially no magnification, you have the ability to do the work iron sights or a red dot can accomplish. This affords the shooter a greater field of view and better awareness of their surroundings. This can be exceedingly valuable for defense or hunting situations. Also, many rifle scopes offer the feature of lit reticles so your optic could truly do the work of a red dot in close quarters.

At the same time, you can spike your magnification up to potentially 6X or 8X to engage long-distance targets. This makes that example of a 300-yard shot more feasible without sacrificing your ability to shoot something a stone’s throw away in front of you. While some of your friends might boast of their ability to shoot far with little magnification, it is better to make your shots as easy as possible instead of tight-rope walking the limit of your abilities behind a rifle.

Practical Considerations
Another consideration aside from the magnification of your optic is the size and weight. Most modern sporting rifles are viewed as mobile firearms — something someone can easily carry or sling over their shoulder. At a weight of roughly 6 lbs., it really diminishes the mobility of your firearm if you tack on a gawdy 4-lb. rifle scope. While it might appear cool for social media and your range buddies, it will fail a “practicality test.”

rifle scopes

rifle scopes
Something that a rifle scope can accomplish that iron sights or a red dot cannot is to make a long, difficult shot more easily possible.

With a rifle scope that can be brought down to 1X, you get the benefits of greater awareness and field of view with the ability to apply magnification.

So, if you have an AR-15 in your stable like a SAINT and want to turn it into more of a workhorse, a rifle scope can add a lot of value! If you believe a scope will be too overpowering or will ruin your chance of close-up shots, think again. A well-chosen rifle scope has the potential to give you the benefits of iron sights, a red dot, and magnification all in one.

The only thing that might deter some people is the price that comes along with it. Good rifle scopes can start around $200 and easily exceed $2,000 fairly quickly. As mentioned earlier, it’s all about finding that balance of what you wish to accomplish and what will get you there. Be safe out there, and happy shooting!

Springfield Armory® recommends you seek qualified and competent training from a certified instructor prior to handling any firearm and be sure to read your owner’s manual. These articles are considered to be suggestions and not recommendations from Springfield Armory. The views and opinions expressed on this website are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Springfield Armory.

Adam Scepaniak
Adam is a manager at The Guns And Gear Store in Waite Park, MN. He’s also a writer for the NRA Shooting Sports USA, TheFirearmBlog, Sierra Bullets, All Outdoor, OutdoorHub, and Boyds Gunstocks. He is a Glock and Smith & Wesson Certified Armorer as well.

 

SKILLS: When You Need A Red Dot

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What are the advantages and disadvantages to red dot optics? READ MORE

red dot sight

SOURCE: Springfield-Armory Armory Life, Adam Scepaniak

While some people who have not jumped on the bandwagon of red dots might view them as a gimmick, I can assure you they offer more than you might think. Red dots can be useful for individuals who may have vision impairments or wear glasses because there’s no need to focus on three points — the rear sight, front sight and the target you are engaging. For some people, having to focus on three varying points can be very difficult. Instead, you can have a singular focus on a red dot overlaid on your target.

red dot sight
A good red dot optic like this Vortex Sparc AR will give you a great sighting option for your rifle.

Real-World Applications
Red dots can be extremely useful for close-quarters target engagement, whether for a competitive league event, recreational shooting or self-defense. Instead of taking the micro-seconds to align a rear sight over a front sight, you can more quickly obtain a sight picture of a singular red dot over what you are shooting. Moreover, wherever a red dot appears, regardless of the shooter’s orientation or symmetry to the target, they will accurately hit.

red dot sight
Combining a red dot and iron sight set up on your SAINT can really amp up its performance.

Red dots may appear to “float” within the optic and that is a result of the red dot correcting for a shooter’s angle or level at which they are aiming. Wherever the dot appears, you will hit. This is a result of the effects of reduced parallax in non-magnified red dot optics. But, putting aside the tech-speak, the end result is that no matter where the dot may appear in the optic, it will be on target downrange. No need to perfectly center it. Simply get the dot on the target and press the trigger.

Another valuable benefit to red dots is their ability to provide good contrast in low-light situations. When iron sights may not be visible during dusk, dawn or overcast conditions, even to an individual with perfect vision, a red dot can create enough contrast to safely and successfully engage a target. Black iron sights on a dark silhouette may make placing a safe shot difficult because you don’t know precisely where on the silhouette you are aiming. A red dot will crisply and definitively show you your reference point.

Pros and Cons
One downside that should be considered for red dots is a need for batteries. The batteries themselves are usually cheap and the battery life of most red dots are improving exponentially to have a working lifespan of one to two years or even more. Even so, you may want to have extra batteries squirreled away in the pistol grip of your rifle or your pocket just in case.

red dot sight
When installing a red dot while iron sights are present, allow for enough space to manage your red dot. Do not block off any buttons you may need to press.

One tactic people will employ if they fear their red dot dying is to co-witness a red dot with their iron sights. The act of co-witnessing is to align their rear iron sight peep through the optic and to the red dot which is covering their front sight post. This triple-alignment assures you are as level and in line with your target as possible. If you happen to break your red dot or its battery dies you simple continue to shoot with your iron sights. This safeguard method is used by a lot of people, and they will flip down their rear sight if that sight picture appears “too busy” to look through.

red dot sight
One option for utilizing your red dot is by co-witnessing (seeing both the red dot and your iron sights) at the same time.

Another advantage with red dots is their capacity to allow the user to have greater spatial awareness around them while shooting. Since you are not tunnel-visioned or intensely focused on a front and rear sight, only the red dot, you can take in your complete peripheral vision and see everything occurring around you. This can be highly valuable in defensive situations so you are not blindsided.

There are lot of benefits to both iron sights and red dots when shooting with your rifle. Be safe out there and happy shooting!

red dot sight
Another co-witnessing option is to fold down your rear sight and align just your red dot and your front sight post.

Springfield Armory® recommends you seek qualified and competent training from a certified instructor prior to handling any firearm and be sure to read your owner’s manual. These articles are considered to be suggestions and not recommendations from Springfield Armory. The views and opinions expressed on this website are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Springfield Armory.

Adam Scepaniak
Adam is a manager at The Guns And Gear Store in Waite Park, MN. He’s also a writer for the NRA Shooting Sports USA, TheFirearmBlog, Sierra Bullets, All Outdoor, OutdoorHub, and Boyds Gunstocks. He is a Glock and Smith & Wesson Certified Armorer as well.

Why You Need Iron Sights

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This is part one of a three-part series on sighting options for your rifle. This first entry covers iron sights. READ MORE

iron sights

SOURCE: Springfield-Armory Armory Life, Kit Perez

While the AR-15 (or “Modern Sporting Rifle”) continues to balloon in popularity for competition, hunting, and defense, there is one facet of it that does not seem to get that much attention: iron sights. Why is that? Many people who are enamored with the AR-15 are equally infatuated with optics. Whether it is magnified optics or red dots, both types of sights are tremendously popular compared to iron sights. So, with optics coming to the forefront of shooter preferences, why and when would someone want to still run iron sights? Fully knowing what a basic set of irons are capable of might be half the battle.

Always On
The misperception of iron sights might stem from the various upbringings we have all had with firearms. If you were introduced to guns as a child with a single-shot, bolt-action .22 Long Rifle with iron sights you likely progressed from there to bigger, better and more modern firearms. Other factions of shooters may have joined the arms bandwagon later in life and began with an AR-15 with an optic, or potentially a different scoped rifle. If you initially skipped over iron sights in your start with rifles, it would be admittedly difficult to regress back to “lesser” technology. Unfortunately for that aforementioned group, lacking a rudimentary understanding of iron sights means you’re missing a basic skill of marksmanship.

When the conversation of “should you use iron sights,” or at a minimum understand them, comes up, I immediately think of Murphy’s Law: What can go wrong, will. Moreover, the technology in optics can fail. Whether it’s a battery dying or glass being irreparable damaged, if you have back-up iron sights you can always remain in the fight, hunt, or competitive event.

Old-School Rangefinding
So, removing the thought of Murphy’s Law from your mindset, why else should you understand and deploy iron sights? For one, the width of a mil-spec front sight post (FSP) can be used to measure the relative size and distance of objects. A mil-spec FSP such as the one present on the Springfield Armory SAINT AR-15 is 0.07” wide. Some fast math tells us that is loosely 3.2 mils at 100 meters.

iron sights
The SAINT’s rear sight has two peep apertures you can use — one is for normal aiming and the other for quick, close-quarters shooting.

More people should become comfortable and familiar with this view because if your optics fail this may be all that you have to work with, for better or worse.

The military teaches that a mil-spec FSP at 150 meters is the average width of a military-aged male’s torso (approximately 19” across). So, for example, if a whitetail deer is facing you straight on and your FSP completely covers the deer’s chest, that particular deer should be at loosely 150 meters. While this is a very primitive ranging technique, in the 21st century it’s great knowledge to keep tucked away in your mind. And it always works. No batteries to run out or glass to break.

Even More Options?
With many sets of iron sights such as on the SAINT, you also get multiple rear apertures through which to aim. Sometimes they’re referred to as day-time and night-time peeps (small and large) while more modern shooting manuals identify each aperture as being utilized for normal shooting and faster close-quarters target acquisition. The ability to have two choices in a rear aperture and greater awareness by not being forced into “tunnel vision focus” with an optic can be quite valuable.

iron sights
While you might think you don’t need those iron sights that come on your SAINT rifle, they are actually a highly capable aiming system.

Since iron sights can serve a two-fold purpose in their peeps and there are handy secrets in their dimensions, when should you use them then? Some of the best applications are for hunting and competition. If you’re going to be participating in a 3-Gun competition, an educational carbine course, the Tactical Games or a similar style AR-15 course of fire, then iron sights could be immensely valuable. In regards to hunting, the ranging ability and fast target acquisition could be handy for unpredictable game appearances. Also, when Murphy’s Law finds you, the likelihood of a nearby gas station stocking your obscure watch battery for your primary optic will be abysmally low. When you’re competing or hunting, it’s often better to “have and not need iron sights than need and not have.”

iron sights

So, if you just added an AR-15 to your arsenal and are thinking of stripping the factory iron sights off of it, think again! They offer a lot of value. Possibly consider using them as a back-up and know that you’ll be more informed and prepared. Be safe out there, and happy shooting!

Adam Scepaniak
Adam is a manager at The Guns And Gear Store in Waite Park, MN. He’s also a writer for the NRA Shooting Sports USA, TheFirearmBlog, Sierra Bullets, All Outdoor, OutdoorHub, and Boyds Gunstocks. He is a Glock and Smith & Wesson Certified Armorer as well.

Springfield Armory® recommends you seek qualified and competent training from a certified instructor prior to handling any firearm and be sure to read your owner’s manual. These articles are considered to be suggestions and not recommendations from Springfield Armory. The views and opinions expressed on this website are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Springfield Armory.

Leupold Debuts the VX-Freedom

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VX-Freedom-Warm_BannerAds300x250

Relentless Reliability: The Leupold VX-Freedom

Innovation is in the very core of the American spirit – we aspire to be independent, to build our own solutions, to constantly improve. It was that core trait that drove Marcus Leupold – son of Fred, the legendary co-founder of Leupold & Stevens, Inc. – to throw aside a riflescope that failed him and build something better. More than 70 years later, that spirit still thrives at Leupold, and it’s embodied tenfold in the new VX-Freedom line of riflescopes.

You want relentless reliability? The VX-Freedom delivers it. You want elite optical performance at a price you can’t ignore? Consider that box checked. You want to unleash your rimfire rifle, dominate from any tree stand, or tag out across an open draw? The VX-Freedom’s got you covered.

The entire VX-Freedom line is designed, machined, and assembled right here in the U.S.A. with one purpose in mind – to give you the freedom to put a Leupold on any long gun you own, knowing it will perform for a lifetime.

VX-Freedom_3-9x40-CD

Elite Optical Performance
Only a company with Leupold’s history and engineering expertise can deliver an American-made optic that boasts performance and affordability like the VX-Freedom. You’re looking at best-in-class optics – crisp, clear images with unmatched edge-to-edge clarity. It’s complete with military-spec lens coatings that provide abrasion resistance, protecting the riflescope in the most challenging terrain. As Tim Lesser, vice president of product development for Leupold & Stevens, Inc., explained, the new line has been built from the ground up to deliver on the promise of the Leupold brand.

“The VX-Freedom is built to deliver the versatility and performance hunters and shooters have come to expect from our brand,” Lesser said. “Whether you’re looking for your first scope or your fortieth, there will be a VX-Freedom that’s purpose-built to suit your needs.”

VX-Freedom_Hunting

Rugged Reliability
Every scope line that comes out of the Leupold factory is “punisher tested and verified” – a relentless process of pounding the optic in a way that replicates a lifetime of abuse. On top of that, it’s engineered to disperse energy during every shot, which adds to its rugged nature. Finally, the VX-Freedom’s new, ergonomically advanced power selector ring is low-profile but provides exceptional grip, making it easy to use even in the cold, wet, or while wearing gloves.

Let There Be Light
It’s no secret that the first and last 20 minutes of any big game hunt are often the most crucial – it’s when the animals are most likely to be up and moving and when you’re most likely to get a shot. Thing is, that’s also when there’s not much light to work with, and you can’t hit what you and your optic can’t see. That’s why the VX-Freedom line incorporates Leupold’s Twilight Light Management System, a proprietary lens coating system that increases the amount of usable light that reaches your eye.

VX-Freedom_Power_Selector

Translation: Your optic will still be able see Bullwinkle during those last five minutes of legal light, even if your naked eye can’t. That means you’re more likely to be calling buddies to help you pack out a kill under the stars.

Unparalleled Versatility
At launch, the VX-Freedom will be available in some of the industry’s most popular magnification ranges: 1.5-4×20, 2-7×33, 3-9×40, 3-9×50, and 4-12×40 – all featuring second focal plane reticles and 1-inch maintubes. They’re great for muzzleloaders, rimfire rifles, and centerfire rifles. But Leupold didn’t stop with just improving the riflescope design, they also decided to offer three brand-new reticles with the VX-Freedom. Alongside the standard Duplex and Pig-Plex offerings, the Freedom is available with a Tri-MOA, Rimfire MOA, or UltimateSlam reticle.

VX-Freedom_Gold_Ring

The Tri-MOA reticle is designed to fill tags – hash marks in 1-MOA increments give you precise reference points for quick, accurate shots, and the upper portion is clear, making it easy to keep an eye on the game animal in your sights. The Rimfire MOA reticle stretches your favorite plinking rifle’s legs out to 200 yards and beyond. The vertical hash marks are set for rimfire rifle ballistics at 1-MOA increments. The UltimateSlam, meanwhile, offers hold points from 50 to 300 yards for muzzleloaders and shotguns.

Built to Last
The VX-Freedom series is everything you’ve come to expect from a Leupold optic. It’s tested to the very same ruggedness standards as the company’s top-tier riflescopes. It’s also backed by the Leupold Full Lifetime Guarantee – you’ll be able to put it through its paces and not have to worry about it holding up.

VX-Freedom_Dials

“We’re relentless because we know our consumers are relentless,” Lesser said. “At the end of the day, you don’t quit, and you don’t back down. Our products won’t, either.”

Click Here to check out the new Leupold VX-Freedom at Midsouth Shooters Supply!

SKILLS: Problems (Some) Riflescopes (Can) Have

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The more you know the better choices you can make. Consider all of this carefully before you purchase your next riflescope.

by NRA Staff

There are some problems that riflescopes can experience, but you should note that modern manufacturing techniques can make a real difference. There are three main issues:

Parallax
Many riflescopes suffer from a condition that stems from the inability of a scope to remain focused at all ranges. The compromise solution for most scopes is to design them to focus at infinity or one specific range. This serves most purposes and simplifies scope design. When a scope is properly focused at the chosen zero range, parallax will be minimal.

However, this is not acceptable for some applications, such as varmint shooting and hunting at long ranges. Under such conditions, parallax becomes a problem that must be addressed. Scope makers solve this problem by offering models with adjustable objective (AO) lenses. AO models incorporate adjustable objective bell housings with graduations marked on the traveling edge that allow quick and easy adjustment to remove parallax at any range. Alternately, some models locate the parallax adjustment in a third turret on the main tube for more convenience. Although AO and side-focus models cost more, shooters demanding enhanced accuracy often feel they are worth the asking price.

Sealing
Most quality scopes are sealed. This means the outer lenses and adjustment systems must be sealed against ingress of water, dust and dirt. This is very important, as dust or dirt inside the tube will degrade the image in several ways, mainly by appearing as black spots within the field of view. Dirt inside the tube can also jam the delicate adjustment system. Moisture inside the tube can cause fogging so that the shooter cannot see through it. Moisture can also cause corrosion of inner parts and surfaces.

Scopes are sealed at the factory by first attaching them to a vacuum pump that removes all air from inside the tube. The tube is then filled with dry nitrogen gas to prevent fogging and then subsequently sealed. Of course, if you remove a turret or the ocular bell housing, the nitrogen gas may escape, thus compromising your scope’s anti-fogging capability.

Many high-quality scopes have double seals to ensure gas-tight integrity. However, no scope is permanently waterproof despite advertising claims to the contrary. Wear, tear, impacts and age all conspire against the tube holding the nitrogen gas. For this reason, most scope manufacturers will reseal and refill a scope at modest cost.

Want to check your scope for leaks? Try this simple test: Fill a sink or washbasin with warm water. Immerse your scope in the water for five minutes and check for bubbles coming from the tube. Bubbles mean leakage and such scopes should be sent back to the manufacturer for resealing and refilling.

Shock & Recoil
Newtonian physics are not kind to riflescopes. In addition to maintaining their accuracy, reliability, and water-tight integrity, scopes must withstand the considerable shock of repeated recoil many times the force of gravity. The delicate adjustment mechanisms and lens mounts are particularly susceptible to high G loads and must be designed accordingly. Scope makers are well aware of this and have designed shock resistance into their products. They have been so successful that shock resistance is now taken for granted by shooters and manufacturers alike.

Air rifles are a special case. Be careful when using conventional riflescopes on a spring-piston air rifle. If you do, the lenses may come loose, sometimes within a few shots, and your scope could be damaged or ruined. The reason is that spring-piston air rifles recoil in both rearward and then forward directions while a conventional rifle recoils only rearward. Thus, a riflescope for a conventional firearm need resist G forces in only one direction — rearward. Air rifle scopes must resist G forces in both directions. This requires a special scope designed for the purpose.

SKILLS: Riflescopes: Lens Coatings

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Lens coatings provide superior optical clarlty and utility. Here’s how and why…

coated lenses

Source: NRAFamily.org

In any optical system, some light is lost through reflection each time the light passes through a glass-to-air surface. The light loss can be significant in multi-element riflescopes; as much as 50 percent of the light may be lost to reflection as it passes through an uncoated lens system.

In the 1940s, it was discovered that magnesium flouride coatings on lenses would increase light transmission, color fidelity and image brightness considerably. Today, nearly all modern scopes have coated lenses that transmit from 95 to 99 percent of the light that enters the objective lens.

Coatings such as zinc sulfide and zirconium oxide are used, often in combination with magnesium flouride. A coated lens will appear tinted when viewed from the side. The exact color may vary from blue, green, purple, red or gold. Abrasion-resistant coatings have been developed for the exterior lens surfaces of modern riflescopes. Water-shedding coatings have also been developed.

Various levels of coating can be applied to lenses ranging from a single layer of magnesium flouride on the exterior objective and ocular surfaces, to as many as 15 layers or more on every surface of every lens. Typically, coating layers are only a few ten-thousandths of an inch thick.

The term “fully coated” when applied to a riflescope usually means that all lens-to-air surfaces have at least one coating layer. This includes the interior lens systems as well as the exterior.
The term “multi-coated” or “multiple-layer coated” signifies that multiple coating layers have been applied to some, but not all, lens surfaces. Normally, this means that only the outer lens surfaces have been multi-coated. “Fully multi-coated” signifies multiple coatings on all lens-to-air surfaces.

Lower-priced scopes may have from one to five lens-coating layers while more expensive scopes may have as many as 15 or even more. In lower-priced scopes, only the outside surface of the objective (front) and ocular (rear) lenses are coated. Higher-quality scopes have all internal and external lens surfaces multi-coated.

How many layers are enough? That depends on the quality of the lens system and the intended purpose of the scope. Adding more layers of coating rapidly reaches the point of diminishing returns, but on a high-quality scope where maximum light transmission and image fidelity are necessary, 15 layers of coating can be easily justified.

SKILLS: Optics ABCs: What All Those Terms Mean

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When it comes to optics for firearms, the specific terms that people use to describe them can be confusing. Here’s what all that argot actually means…in alphabetical order, no less.

Source: NRAFamily.org

rifleman with scope

Contrast
The ability of an optical system to distinguish clearly and crisply between areas of light and dark is called contrast. For shooting purposes, always select the riflescope with the highest contrast.

Exit Pupil
Exit pupil is the diameter, in millimeters, of the beam of focused light transmitted by the ocular lens. The exit pupil can be calculated by dividing the diameter of the objective lens by the power, or magnification, of the scope. An exit pupil of about 5mm or larger in diameter is preferable. A large exit pupil provides a brighter image with greater contrast and a wide field of view for easy target acquisition. Exit pupils smaller than 5mm in diameter offer darker images with lower contrast and progressively narrower fields of view.

Eye Relief
Eye relief is the distance of the eye from the ocular lens when the image fully fills the lens and is not vignetted. Normally, eye relief figures are given as a distance range, for example 3.2 to 3.8 inches, due to differences in individual visual acuity. On a variable-power scope, eye relief typically changes with scope power. Too little eye relief is undesirable, particularly on a scope mounted on a hard-kicking magnum rifle, where it may contribute to a “scope bite” on the eyebrow. For this reason, most centerfire riflescopes have a minimum eye relief of 3 to 4 inches. A riflescope with an eye relief of less than 3 inches should only be used on a small-caliber rifle with low recoil.

Most riflescopes and shotgun scopes are designed to be mounted on the receiver, close to the eye, and thus have relatively short eye relief. Scopes to be mounted on handguns and on the barrels of long guns are classed as long eye relief (LER) or extended eye relief (EER) scopes. Some models provide as much as 18 to 20 inches of eye relief, enabling scope use on a handgun extended at arm’s length. Other models may offer an eye relief of 12 inches or less for scope mounting on a scout rifle. Note that the higher the magnification, the shorter the eye relief of such scopes.

Field of View
Field of view is the width of the area that can be seen in the image at a given distance. Normally, field of view is expressed as the number of feet in the image at 1,000 yards, for example 322 feet at 1,000 yards. Field of view decreases dramatically with increasing magnification. A narrow field of view makes it difficult to find the target and then to hold it in the image. For this reason, a wide field of view may be more important than high scope magnification.

When looking through a scope with a 100-foot field of view at 1,000 yards, a 100-foot-wide object viewed at that distance will just fill the visual field.

Focal Plane
The focal plane is the plane or distance from the objective lens at which light rays from an object converge to form a focused image inside the main tube. Objects in the same focal plane appear to the eye to be at the same distance, and therefore can be seen with equal clarity without the need to refocus the eye. One of the advantages of optical sights is that the target and the reticle are in the same focal plane. This eliminates trying to focus on both iron sights and the target at the same time. This is why riflescopes are so popular with shooters who have less-than-perfect eyesight.

There are two focal planes in a typical riflescope: The first behind the objective lens, and the second behind the erector lens set.

See the huge selection of riflescopes available here at Midsouth HERE

The Bullet-Cam, a Whole New Perspective in Shooting

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Just watch the video below. Turn on the sound, and gape in amazement at what technology has brought forth.

Now, how do you feel about this advancement? What questions do you have for Hornady or Vortex? How will the VIP Warranty work for an optic which is strapped to the end of a tiny missile?

Comments on their respective social media platforms field many of these mind boggling questions. Apparently, the warranty expires once the bullet leaves the barrel. The camera is suspended in a gel similar to that of the human eye. The camera is powered by positive thinking, just like Tony Robbins. Most importantly, you can live stream to Facebook, because Facebook would LOVE this…Right?

This is truly one of my favorite days every year. I’m a self proclaimed gullible goof, so this one got me right in the gut. I literally turned to one of our purchasers and exclaimed, “Why are these not on the website yet???” Needless to say, I’ve earned a new nickname around the office…

Thanks Hornady, and Vortex for playing along. I’m off to track down the Boggy Creek Monster on the back of a unicorn.

Leatherwood Hi-Lux Micro-Max B-Dot Sight Review

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According to the Major, you don’t have to spend a fortune to get a truly good red-dot sight…

by Major Pandemic

It used to be that you had to spend the price of your gun just to get a quality red-dot that would endure the abuse dished out in the field. Today we are fortunate that new manufacturing technologies and materials have advanced to the point that a good red-dot can be had for under $100 and a truly high quality red-dot such as this Hi-Lux model are just over $200.

Leatherwood, red-dot, AR15, optic sight, Hi-Lux
The Leatherwood Hi-Lux Micro-Max B-Dot is rugged, reliable, and reasonable.

Leatherwood, red-dot, AR15, optic sight, Hi-Lux

Just after the initial release my then-new Hi-Lux Micro-Max B-Dot sight was mounted on a basic AR15 pistol build and it was later moved to my Sig MPX 9mm pistol. One year and approximately 8000 rounds of .223 and 9mm later, the Hi-Lux Micro-Max B-Dot has performed amazingly well, still holds zero, and I am still on the first factory included battery. From my perspective it is one of the top values for a high quality red-dot sight, so much so that I ordered another one.

This time the red-dot was mounted on a very special Aero Precision M4E1 custom AR15 pistol build.  The build has it all — AP M4E1 integrated handguard mount, a unique cool and functional upper design, an ambi-lower, KNS anti-rotate pins, Ballistic Advantage match barrel, HiperFire EDT2 trigger, and Phase 4 Tactical buffer tube, BCG, Charging Handle, and FatMan Brake. It is a heck of tricked out build that needed a great red-dot and the Hi-Lux is the perfect choice offering a lot of features, great optical clarity and a crisp red-dot.

FIT, FINISH, FEEL, FEATURES, AND FUNCTIONS
The Hi-Lux Micro-Max B-Dot is typical high quality that you would see on all Leatherwood Hi-Lux optics. The red-dot design is robust and designed to take a lot of abuse. Once upon a time, only Aimpoint could boast about a 50K+ hour run time, but now this $220 red-dot can deliver that same long run-time.

The Hi-Lux Micro-Max B-Dot also features a tintless tube which in turn provides an extreme amount of clarity and enhanced low light vision. It is one of the few red-dot sights which gives the shooter clear glass versus a dark sunglasses tint. From a form factor the sight is completely cross compatible with all Aimpoint T-1 mounts which are available everywhere. If you have a favorite Aimpoint T1 mount it will work with the Hi-Lux. A couple of my favorite mounts are the Sampson QR T-1 QD mount and American Defense Manufacturing ADM T1 Micro QD Mount. Hi-Lux offers its own $35 co-witness riser, which is hard to pass up for the price, and is the mount I ordered for this build.

The Hi-Lux Micro-Max is extremely compact 2.5-inch length and comes with flip-up lens covers, screw on/off kill flash filter, and spare CR2032 battery compartment in the battery cover. Dot size is 2 MOA, tube size 20mm. Of note, with the added kill flash filter and lens covers installed it does add a bit of bulk over an Aimpoint T1 or similar Primary Arms Micro Dot but not any significant weight. I think most people will appreciate the snap and screw on features unless they really need to strip all the add-ons off for some reason.

My initial Hi-Lux Micro-Max B-Dot sight held zero perfectly through more than a few bumps bangs and scrapes and thousands of rounds of 9mm and 5.56 NATO. I did have some initial concern that the extremely lightweight Hi-Lux Riser might not hold up well to side hits due to the I-beam steel design; however, I have never had an issue and it is far stronger than it looks.

Instead of the typical rotary setting switch, Hi-Lux decided on using push-button operation instead that provides click ON, hold for OFF, and click UP/DOWN to cycle through the 12 dot brightness settings.

Leatherwood Hi-Lux Micro-Max B-Dot, AR15, AR15 pistol, red-dot, optic sight, Aimpoint
I choose this red-dot for a prize AR15 pistol. It’s a fine compliment.

FINAL THOUGHTS
The Hi-Lux Micro-Max B-Dot is one of my favorite red-dot sights. It functions perfectly, delivers excellent clarity, and offers plenty of daylight to low-light dot brightness settings. I will not likely be in a situation where I need a Kill Flash attachment, however the lens covers work extremely well. Owning a safe full of red-dot sights, my experience is that they get dirty quick and the flip-up covers really help assure the glass is clean and bright when I need to shoot.


major pandemic

Major Pandemic is an editor at large who loves everything about shooting, hunting, the outdoors, and all those lifesaving little survival related products. His goal is simple, tell a good story in the form of a truthful review all while having fun. He contributes content to a wide variety of print and digital magazines and newsletters for companies and manufacturers throughout the industry with content exposure to over 2M readers monthly.  MajorPandemic.com

SHOT Show 2016 Special Edition: New Optics

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Guest post by Robert Sadowski, courtesy of SHOT Daily.

The influence of 3-Gun shooting has affected all sectors of the industry, including optics. This year, there are numerous compact, low- to medium-power riflescope options for those 3-Gun shooters who have a need for speed. Going long is also a continuing trend, with plenty of long-range scopes with huge tubes and gaping objectives at all price points. Red-dots continue to be popular, with brands offering all types of sights for all classes of firearms platforms. Here’s a look at some of the players in optics and the new gear they have to offer.

AIM Sports

The 2–6x32mm is a variable-power medium-range tactical scope with a side-mounted red-laser module. The 4x32mm tactical riflescope features a tri-­illuminated rapid-ranging reticle designed for MSR platforms and calibrated to the ballistics of the .223 Rem. A simple yet durable fixed-power 3x36mm tactical scope features a tri-illuminated reticle. For hunters, the 3–9x40mm scope features a one-inch tube and covered low-­profile turrets. Locking turrets are now available on the XPF line of riflescopes. (aimsportsinc.com)

BSA

The Prevo hunting scope line is designed for the diehard hunter. Models include the PV3–9x40mm (SRP: $69.95), PV3.5–10x50mm (SRP: $79.95), PV4–16x44mm (SRP: $104.95), and PV6–24x44mm (SRP: $109.95), all of which feature a 30/30 reticle. (bsaoptics.com)

Bushnell

The military-grade Elite 1-Mile laser rangefinder with CONX technology (SRP: $819.95) provides instant customized holdover and wind-hold data at the press of a button. The unit features Bluetooth connectivity, with a smartphone app that allows users to select or enter custom ballistic curves. It also offers an Applied Ballistics mode that connects with CONX-compatible Kestrel devices. (bushnell.com)

Carson

A 10x42mm full-size binocular has been added to the 3D/ED Series and features HD coating, ED glass, and Mossy Oak Break-Up Infinity finish body armor. (carson.com)

Crimson Trace

The LinQ system (SRP: $500) is a laser/light unit designed for the MSR platform that uses Bluetooth-like technology between a pistol grip to control a tactical light/laser module without cables or touch pads. Ambidextrous buttons on the pistol grip allow the user to operate the laser/light module, which can be removed from the MSR and used on another firearm. The Carry 9 Program (SRP: $249, red; $319, green) packages a Blade-Tech Klipt Ambi IWB concealed-carry holster with a Crimson Trace laser sight for either a Smith & Wesson M&P Shield or Glock G43 pistol. Using Shock Stop (SRP: $319, red; $399, green) technology for red and green laser grips on S&W J-Frame Round-Butt revolvers helps reduce felt recoil. New Master Series 1911 laser grips include aggressive textured aluminum and faux ivory models. (crimson trace.com)

C-More Systems

3-Gun shooters will like the C3 1–6x24mm (SRP: $1,999) riflescope for the MSR platform. Features include lockable target turrets, with elevation zero stop and an illuminated reticle that is calibrated for a .223 Rem. 55-grain bullet. The Lazer Point MTL-OS is a tiny laser sight for Glock pistols that magnetically attaches over the rear sight. It can be removed or installed in seconds with no tools. (cmore.com)

Celestron

Adding to the Trailseeker series of spotting scopes are three models: a 65mm (SRP: $238.95 straight, $249.95 angled), 80mm (SRP: $309.95 straight, $319.95 angled), and 100mm (SRP: $489.95 straight, $499.95 angled). Features include a rubber-armored housing that is water- and fogproof. Adaptors for the iPhone 5/5S, 6, and 6+ offer an exact fit for any phone and eyepiece combination. (celestron.com)

FLIR

The compact Scout III comes in three thermal resolutions: 240×180, 320×256, and 640×512 pixels (SRP starts at $1,899). These are the latest generation of handheld thermal devices. Units can detect and display the body heat of animals, people, or objects up to 1,200 yards away in total darkness, and now feature refresh rates of 30Hz or 60Hz, depending on model. The Scout TK (SRP: $500) thermal handheld camera is designed for campers, hikers, and hunters. (flir.com)

Hartman Ltd

Hartman is a new player in the red-dot optic space and is debuting the MH1 Red Dot Reflex Sight (SRP: $650), an advanced tactical sight with the largest (compared to other similar devices) field of view through the sight. It is waterproof up to 20 feet and night-vision-compatible. It also features ambidextrous activation buttons and a sleep mode. (hartman-il.com)

Hi-Lux Optics

Debuting is a line of 34mm tube and first-focal-plane scopes. First-focal-plane models include the compact CMR8 1–8x34mm (SRP: $799) and the PentaLux 4–20x50mm (SRP: $599). The 34mm tube models include the CMR8 1-8x34mm and the long-range Vanquisher 6–26x50mm (SRP: $499), as well as the BMG scope and a Uni-Dial series 5–30x56mm (SRP: $599) with 34mm tube and customizable ballistic turrets. (hi-luxoptics.com)

Konus USA

The economical Pro M30 riflescopes are redesigned to provide clearer views for long shots in low-light conditions. Two models include a 2.5–10x50mm (SRP: $219.99) and a 3–12x56mm (SRP: $249.99). Both use an engraved 30/30 reticle with dual illumination. The upgraded SightPro DP (SRP: $79.99) red-dot sight offers 1X power for close-range shooting and a 2X power-booster attachment for medium range. It works on pistols, shotguns, MSRs, bolt-action rifles, and even blackpowder rifles. The affordable Rex 8x42mm (SPR: $169.99) binocular uses a silver coating on the prisms for improved light transmission. (konuspro.com)

Laser Genetics

The powerful NS-300 Subzero series features two models—NS300-SZ (SRP: $339.95) and NS300x40-SZ (SRP: $389.95)—with a focusable 520mm green laser that can paint targets out to 500 yards. (lasergenetics.com)

LaserMax

The Spartan Laser series (SRP: $99, red; $149, green) features a mounting system designed specifically for handgun accessory rails, with ambidextrous activation and automatic shutoff after 10 minutes. (lasermax.com)

Leapers/UTG

The 8X power T8 Series 2–16x44mm MRC (Multi-Range Combat & Competition) riflescope (SRP: $399.97) is set up for close-, medium-, and long-range distances. Three reticle options include a mil-dot, a circle dot, and a reticle for airgunners. The 3.9-inch Open Reflex Sight (SRP: $199.97) is built for MSRs and offers a large field of view, a Picatinny mount, and dual red and green illuminated circle dot or dot reticle options. The 6-inch ITA Red/Green CQB Dot Sight (SRP: $74.97) offers 1X magnification in either a T-dot or dot reticle option. (leapers.com)

Leica

The ER 5 series of riflescopes includes six new models—a 1–5x24mm, 1.5–8x32mm, 2–10x50mm, 3–15x56mm, 4–20x50mm, and 5–25×56 mm (SRP: $749 to $1,429). The ER line features extended 5:1 zoom ratios, 4-inch eye relief, and .25 MOA turret adjustments. The Geovid HD-R 42 laser rangefinding binocular comes in two models—an 8x42mm (SRP: $2,599) and 10x42mm (SRP: $2,649)—and features an open-bridge design and accurate ranging from 10 to more than 2,000 yards. Effective Horizontal Range (EHR) technology provides precise shooting solutions based upon distance and angles within .2 seconds of pressing the activation button. (us.leica-camera.com)

Leupold

Designed and assembled in the U.S., the new VX-3i hunting scope line (SRP: $499.99 to $1,249.99) features the Twilight Max light-management system, which balances light across the visible spectrum for a brighter, crisper image. Scopes are equipped with an easier-to-turn power selector, with bold, tactile power indicators and a dual-spring-adjustment system that provides match-grade accuracy adjustments while maintaining its in-the-field ruggedness. The BX-3 Mojave Pro Guide HD binocular line has two 50mm models—a 10x50mm ($774.99 to $819.99) and 12x50mm ($839.99 to $874.99)—that offer a 15 percent increase in field of view. The open-bridge design is durable but light in weight. Available in Kryptek Typhon and Kryptek Highlander camo patterns or black. Bowhunters take note: The Vendetta 2 (SRP: $439.99) bow-mounted laser rangefinder now has a faster software package and improved mounting system, and it can be used on a crossbow. Leupold’s built-in True Ballistic Range (TBR) calculator automatically compensates for the shot angle, delivering the correct incline-adjusted range instantly. (leupold.com)

Lucid

The P7 4X optic (SRP: $435) offers fast targeting with a ballistic MOA holdover reticle. The 19-ounce unit runs up to 2,500 hours on a single AA battery, and is waterproof, shockproof, and fogproof. (mylucidgear.com)

Meopta USA

The one-inch-tube MeoPro line now has two additional models—a 6.5–20x50mm and 6.5–20x50mm HTR (SRP: $1,092.49 to $1,149.99, depending on model and reticle). The scopes are designed for long-range hunting and precision shooting, and feature a powerful magnification range and side-turret parallax adjustment, and are available with four different reticle options, depending on the model: Z-Plex, BDC, McWhorter HV, and Windmax 8. The MeoPro HD binocular series now includes the MeoPro 8x56mm HD (SRP: $1,034.99), designed for low light with a large objective lens, advanced fluoride high-definition optics, and MeoBright multi-­coated lenses. (meoptasportsoptics.com)

Meprolight

The Sting (SRP: $1,557) dual-wavelength laser pointer incorporates two lasers—visible and infrared—in one unit. Features include single zeroing, high- and low-power options, and color-coded LED indicators for visible or infrared modes. Available to LE and military personnel only. (themakogroup.com)

Minox

The new ZX5 line of riflescopes features four models—a 1–5x24mm, 2–10x50mm, 3–15x56mm, and 5–26x56mm (SRP: $499.99 to $749.99, depending on model and reticle). Features include a 30mm tube, with or without an illuminated BDC or Plex reticle, and 5X magnification. (minox.com/usa)

NcSTAR

The VISM Reflex Sight with Green Laser (SRP: $119.99) is a compact sight system that combines a red reflex sight and a green laser. Both the dot sight and laser are controlled by a push-­button control panel and powered by a single CR123A battery. The sight provides a 1/3 co-witness with BUIS. (ncstar.com)

Nightforce Optics

The SHV 4–14×50 F1 (SRP: $1,250) scope is Nightforce’s first first-focal-plane reticle scope and latest addition to the SHV line. The scope features illuminated reticle options, side parallax adjustment, and .25 MOA or .1 Mil-Radian adjustments with 90 MOA of elevation and 70 MOA windage. (night forceoptics.com)

Nikon

Six new riflescopes, three in the Monarch 3 series—3–12x42mm (SRP: $549.95), 4–16x42mm (SRP: $579.95), 4–16x50mm (SRP: $629.95)—and three in the Prostaff series—3.5–14x40mm (SRP: $359.95), 3.5–14x50mm (SRP: $459.95), 4.5–18x40mm (SRP: $459.95)—will now be equipped with BDC Distance Lock. The new BDC Distance Lock function keeps everything in the first focal plane, which allows the riflescope to maintain its scale and distance proportions on a target throughout the entire zoom range. (nikonsportoptics.com)

Rudolph Optics

The Hunter H1 3–9x40mm (SRP: $294.95) scope is designed for medium and long distances in centerfire and rimfire calibers, and features a D1 reticle. The Varmint Hunter VH 4–16x50mm (SRP: $1,095) scope features a T3 reticle, efficient light transmission, a wide magnification range, and long eye relief. The Tactical T1 6–24x50mm (SRP: $1,295) scope comes equipped with a T3 reticle calibrated in true .25 MOA values at 20X magnification and can be re-indexed to zero after sighting in. (rudolphoptics.com)

SIG SAUER

SIG has gone all in with a complete line of optics for 2016. All of SIG’s riflescopes feature one custom SBT (SIG Ballistic Turret) elevation dial calibrated to your customer’s ballistics and environmental conditions. TANGO6 6X zoom premium riflescopes were designed for a wide range of uses, from close-quarter battle and long-range shooting to 3-Gun and dangerous-game hunting. Models include a compact 1–6x42mm, 2–12x40mm, 3–18x44mm, and a long-range 5–30x56mm (SRP: $1,749.99 to $2,999.99). These scopes come with the HDX optical system, HellFire fiber optic, and glass-etched illuminated reticles, first- or second-focal-plane designs, and zero stop turrets. With a 4:1 zoom and first-focal-plane design, the TANGO4 riflescope line is intended for mid- to long-range shooting. Models offered include a 1–4x24mm, 3–12x42mm, 4–16x44mm, and 6–24x50mm (SRP: $749.99 to $1,249.99), all with illuminated glass reticles, 30mm tube, and ZeroLock turrets.

The WHISKEY-5 series of 5X riflescopes were designed for traditional hunting rifle and MSR platforms. Models include a 1–5x20mm, 2–10x42mm, 2.4–12x56mm, 3–15x44mm, 3–15x52mm, and 5–25x52mm (SRP: $874.99 to $1,624.99). WHISKEY-3 scopes feature low-dispersion glass, a rugged chassis, capped turrets, and one custom SBT elevation dial. Models include a 2–7x32mm, 3–9x40mm, 3–9x50mm, 4–12x40mm, and 4–12x50mm (SRP: $229.99 to $374.99). The prism-design BRAVO series of red-dot battle sights are designed for MSR shooters. These fixed-power sights include a BRAVO3 3x30mm (SRP: $437.49) and a BRAVO5 5x30mm (SRP: $499.99), which are compact and offer 10 levels of illumination intensity. The BRAVO4 (SRP: $1,624.99) features a 53-foot field of view at 100 yards versus the standard 37 feet. The red-dot and reflex sight ROMEO series can fill most shooters’ pistol, shotgun, and rifle needs. The miniature ROMEO1 reflex sight (SRP: $374.99 to $437.49, depending on mounting system) is designed to fit most popular pistols; it co-­witnesses with iron sights on SIG pistols with machined slides. Manual brightness controls use SIG’s MOTAC (Motion Activated Illumination) system, which remembers your last setting after powering off. The larger ROMEO3 reflex sight (SRP: $474.99 to $499.99) is designed for MSR rifles, shotguns, carbines, submachine guns, and full-size handguns. ROMEO4 tube-style red-dots (SRP: $474.99 to $499.99) come in four different models that offer Picatinny and KeyMod mounts, combo solar/battery power, and have either a 2 MOA dot or 65 MOA circle/2 MOA dot reticle options. The ROMEO7 (SRP: $374.99) is a full-size 1X red-dot sight designed for MSR platforms. The KILO2000 rangefinder (SRP $624.99) updates four times a second in HyperScan mode with LightWave DSP technology that is fast and accurate, and can range reflective targets at 3,400 yards, trees at 1,500 yards, and deer at 1,200 yards. The built-in inclinometer calculates range for angled shots.

The rugged roof prism ZULU binocular line combines high-quality glass, Spectracoat lenses, and Abbe-Konig prisms for brightness, contrast, and crisp resolution. ZULU3 models include a compact 8x32mm (SRP: $312.49) and 10x32mm (SRP: $337.49), the single-hinge ZULU5 8×42 and 10x42mm, the open-hinge ZULU7 8x42mm (SRP: $849.99) and 10x42mm (SRP $912.49), and the ZULU9 9x45mm (SRP: $1,437.49) and 11x45mm (SRP: $1,499.99).(sigsauer.com)

Steiner

The new HX series of binoculars is designed for comfort during extended scouting and uses new lens coatings for better light transmission. These roof prism binoculars include four models: 8x42mm (SRP: $919.99), 10x42mm (SRP: $999.99), 10x56mm (SRP: $1,499.99), and 15x56mm. (steiner-optics.com)

Swarovski

The X5(i) riflescope series was developed with the long-range shooter and hunter in mind. The two models are a 3.5–18x50mm (SRP: $3,432 to $3,666, depending on reticle) and a 5–25x56mm (SRP: $3,666 to $3,888, depending on reticle). The scopes have up to 116 MOA of elevation adjustment inside the 30mm tube body and a 5X zoom range. The improved EL binocular family has six new models, including an 8x32mm (SRP: $2,443), 10x32mm (SRP: $2,554), 8.5x42mm (SRP: $2,832), 10x42mm (SRP: $2,888), 10x50mm (SRP: $3,110), and 12x50mm (SRP: $3,188). The line features SWAROVISION technology and the FieldPro package, which enhances binocular comfort and ease of use. (swarovskioptik.com)

Trijicon

The Miniature Rifle Optic, or MRO (SRP: $579 without mount, $629 with mount), red-dot sight features a large objective lens and shortened optical length to eliminate the tube effect common with so many tube red-dot sights. Comes equipped with a 2 MOA dot aiming point. (trijicon.com)

TRUGLO

The TRU-BRITE 30 compact rifle series includes a 1–4x24mm and 1–6x24mm (SRP: $184 to $270) that feature an illuminated reticle and two pre-calibrated BDC turrets for .223 Rem. and .308 Win. The compact ultralight TRU TEC 20mm (SRP: $221) tactical red-dot sight offers a 2 MOA reticle and unlimited eye relief. The larger TRU TEC 30mm red-dot (SRP: $368) offers a larger tube. (truglo.com)

U.S. Optics

The design of the ER-23 3–23x50mm riflescope was based upon requests from military, LE, and competitive shooters. The scope is compact to accommodate night vision and features locking turrets. Reticle options include the MIL GAP and the Horus H59. (usoptics.com)

Vortex

The Diamondback binocular line has been redesigned with eight new models: 8x28mm, 8x32mm, 8x42mm, 10x28mm, 10x32mm, 10x42mm, 10x50mm, and 12x50mm (SRP: $189 to $319). Features include a short-hinge design and rubber-armored housing. (vortexoptics.com)

Zeiss

The all-new Victory V8 illuminated riflescope line includes a 1–8x30mm (SRP: $2,888.99), 1.8–14x50mm (SRP: $3,333.32), 2.8–20x56mm (SRP: $3,888.88), and 4.8–35x60mm (SRP: $4,111.10). Select models include the bullet-drop compensator ASV system, which uses nine engraved rings to allow shooters to match the appropriate ring to their specified long-range ballistics. The pocket-size Terra ED 8x25mm (SRP: $299.99) and 10x25mm (SRP: $329.99) binoculars are lightweight and compact, weighing just 10.9 ounces. The Terra ED 32mm binoculars, in 8x32mm (SRP: $411.10) and 10x32mm (SRP: $444.43), are now equipped with an exclusive Under Armour bino harness that features durable, thick hypalon attachments, solid metal hardware, and adjustable elastic straps. (zeiss.com)

Reporting by SHOT Business Daily, reprinted with permission. SHOT Daily, produced by The Bonnier Corporation and the National Shooting Sports Foundation, covers all facets of the yearly firearms-industry show. Click here to see full issues. Product pricing and availability are at of time of publication and subject to change without notice.