Tag Archives: Remington

REVIEW: Remington 870 DM

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This may be the best pump action shotgun for your needs… READ WHY HERE

870 DM
The author finds the 870 DM a good all around shotgun with much to recommend.

Bob Campbell

The Remington 870 DM is a detachable magazine pump action shotgun that is garnering a great deal of interest and both positive and negative comments. It isn’t the first detachable magazine shotgun as the AK types have been in use for some time and there are detachable aftermarket kits for modifying existing shotguns. But this is a production pump action shotgun from the Big Green. Some feel the popularity of the AR 15 rifle had led to the detachable magazine shotgun. The tube fed shotgun just worked so well with so little complaint the only attention it received was a long extended magazine tube. It is interesting that Remington did not choose a self loading shotgun. Then there is the magazine, which at six shells is hardly a high capacity type. Just the same the shotgun bears study as it offers many advantages for both individuals and police departments.

The pump action shotgun is a model of reliability and the Remington 870 among the most respected. Since the pump action shotgun is manually operated the power or recoil impulse of the shells doesn’t matter. Low brass birdshot or Magnum buckshot is equally reliable in the pump action shotgun. The shooter manipulates the action and a trained shooter can be pretty fast with a smooth shotgun such as the Remington 870. With some eleven million Remington 870s sold it isn’t an unknown quantity. And while the 870 DM differs significantly from the original 870, it is essentially still a Remington 870 pump action. The DM is offered in several versions including tactical and hunting versions. My shotgun and the one used in this test is a standard wood furniture version with bead front sight. There are tactical and hunting versions of the DM listed on the Remington website.

870 DM
The magazine is well designed.

If you use an AR 15 type rifle then the use of a shotgun with a detachable magazine will be simple enough. The original 870 uses a tubular magazine under the barrel. In different versions this tube holds four to eight shells. The shells are loaded one at a time. The advantage of simply loading the piece with a detachable magazine is obvious. I have to point out that the tube fed shotgun may be topped off with a shell or two as needed during an action if the need is there. Just the same, if the shotgun is fired empty and you need a reload right now the removable box magazine is the way to go. It is much faster to change a magazine than to thumb the shells into place one shell at a time. The DM, like all 870s, may be quickly fired by opening the action dropping a shell in the chamber and firing. The tube under the barrel with the DM is simply a tube that serves as a guide for the forend as it is used to rack the action.

The magazine well looks like an aftermarket addition but isn’t. The receiver isn’t a standard 870 and the bolt differs as well. The mechanical operation is a pump action 870 but the parts of the DM are not interchangeable with the 870 in many cases. Even the trigger group is different. However, common accessories such as stocks and forends do interchange and the many different barrel types for the 870 also may be used in the 870 DM. Operation of the 870 DM is straightforward. The magazine doesn’t load like a rifle magazine but a shotgun magazine and the shells are pressed firmly to the rear to load. The magazine locks solidly in place with a bit of practice. The magazine release is placed forward of the magazine.

Depending on arm length, shooting style and even clothing, when you are firing the shotgun and racking the forend the arm may contact the magazine. Keep the elbow bent slightly in order to be certain you do not contact the magazine with the arm on the backstroke. The action is as smooth as any modern Remington 870 and that is pretty smooth. Chances are the shotgun will smooth up with use as my Magpul Tactical Remington 870 has. The advantage or disadvantages of the shotgun with a detachable magazine will be debated. The magazine tube is proven and does not interfere with stashing behind the truck seat or riding in a rack in a police cruiser. The tube is easily loaded and it is practically unknown for a shotgun magazine tube to fail.(Disregarding cheap plastic aftermarket extensions.) The magazine is easily loaded for those familiar with magazine fed rifles. An important advantage for safety is that the shotgun is more easily unloaded with the magazine. Rather than pressing tabs in the shotgun to release shells from the tub one at a time, the DM may be unloaded simply by removing the magazine. The DM version holds a total of seven shells with six in the magazine and one in the chamber. The tactical versions of the tube fed 870 hold eight in the magazine, standard versions four. I recommend against anyone keeping a shell in the chamber for home defense. The shotgun may be made ready quickly enough to face a threat. Shotgunners often keep a slug or two along with buckshot in a shell carrier on the receiver of the shotgun. With the DM version a brace of slugs may be kept at ready in a removeable magazine. A trained individual using a standard pump shotgun may change out to a slug in the chamber quickly, changing the gunload is another matter. There are a lot of options and debates concerning the DM and I am certain it will not replace the traditional tube fed shotgun. New buyers not familiar with tube fed shotgun are probably going to be the most common customer.

870 DM
This is a fast handling and effective shotgun.

Over the course of several days two hundred twenty shells were fired, a goodly number for such a hard kicking beast. The shotgun is smooth enough and tracks well and I was able to get good results on target after a modest acclimation. Reduced recoil buckshot is a proven law enforcement load that should prove ideal for home defense as well. Reducing the velocity of the buckshot load actually results in a tighter pattern with the 18 inch barrel Remington. The 870 DM had no problem handling this loading. Patterns were as good as with any Remington shotgun. I used Remington 12 gauge 00 buckshot in the Managed Recoil line. Results were excellent. I have also used the new #4 buckshot loading in the Ultimate Defense line. Results were good. I think that the Remington DM is a modern shotgun with much appeal. It is useful for defense against dangerous animals or light cover if needed- simply switch to slugs. The Remington 870 DM is a useful and reliable shotgun per our testing. For many the 870 DM will be a great improvement.

870 DM
#4 buckshot offers a good pattern.

READ MORE HERE

RELOADERS CORNER: Priming, Part 2

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Last time the tooling and process of seating a primer got detailed, and now more details about The Thing Itself. Read all about it…

primer close up

Glen Zediker

A primer consists of a brass (usually) cup filled with impact-detonated explosive compound, lead styphate specifically. Right. Primers explode. The compound starts as liquid, not that that matters, and while it’s still wet, a triangular metal piece called an “anvil” is positioned in the opening. When it’s hit by the firing pin, the center of the cup collapses, squeezing the explosive compound between the interior of the cup and the anvil. That ignites the compound and shoots a flame through the flash hole. That ignites the propellant.

There are two primer sizes, and then type variations. The two sizes are “small” and “large.” For example, .223 Rem. uses small, .308 Win. uses large. Rifle primers and pistol primers are not the same, even though they have diameters in common. Rifle primers have a tougher cup, and, usually, provide a hotter flash. Do not substitute pistol primers for rifle primers! Some pistol shooters using very high-pressure loads substitute rifle primers, but also often need to increase striker impact power.

Variations: There are small variations in primer dimensions, heights and diameters, and also variations exist in new-case primer pocket dimensions, among various brands, and, of course, lot-to-lot variations can and do exist within any one brand. Usually, these variations are not influential to suitability. Usually. However! On occasion, small diameter variations can affect how well different primers will feed through various make priming apparatus. This can and has become a hitch in some progressive loading machines. Cup height variations can lead to seating depth (primer height) issues.

Remington 7-1/2 primers
I have my “go-to” primer, as do most, but I’ve found best results in certain circumstances with another brand. I will not vary primers, though, in my tournament ammo for any one day: as with propellants and bullets, each leaves a different residue in the bore, and that will, not can, influence zero making the switch. In other words, I won’t use CCI for short-line loads, and Remington for 600-yard ammo, not on the same day.

There are also “magnum” primers. These have a hotter spark. They are engineered to deliver a stouter kick-off to larger, more dense columns of slower-burning propellant. They also work well with spherical-type propellants (less air space between the granules). There are also “match” primers. These ostensibly are more consistent quality. Not all manufacturers offer these options. If they do, unless you have a scheme or more carefully-considered reason, just go with what fits your application. There’s no need for match primers in blasting ammo. There are, no doubt (and no doubt significant) differences among varying brand primers with respect to “output.” As mentioned earlier on, there are also pretty well-known tendencies that are either more or less preferable among varying primer brands.

The primer is, in my experience, the greatest variable that can change the performance of a load combination, which is mostly to say “pressure.” Never (never ever) switch primer brands without backing off the propellant charge and proving to yourself how far to take it back up, or to even back it off more. Don’t deny this one.

I back off one full grain of propellant to try a different primer brand.

Finding the best-performing primer for any particular combination of cartridge, bullet, and propellant isn’t just always as easy as putting a “match” primer in there. I have my preference, and it’s what I try first, but, to be certain, sometimes best accuracy and consistency (related) come with another. Again, it’s a combination of propellant fill volume, burning rate, propellant type (single-base, double-base, extruded, or spherical), and column “packing” density that favors either a “hotter” or “cooler” flash.

Priming cup composition also factors mightily in my final choice, and that’s a big factor in some semi-autos. More next time.

primer tray
Here’s handy. A primer “flip” tray puts all the primers in the sams orientation and orients them for easy loading into a primer magazine feed tube for use in many automated systems. See what’s available at Midsouth HERE

SAFETY
Do be extra careful handling primers! No kidding. It’s the most explosive element in a cartridge, and it’s intended to be detonated from impact, so… Wearing safety glasses at the loading bench might seem nerdy, but it’s wise. Likewise, and this has happened way on more than once, but, fortunately, never yet to me, is a mass detonation of primers contained in a feeding device, such as a primer feeding magazine tube. Such circumstance is grave indeed. Progressive loading machines, as well as many bench-mounted appliances, use a tube magazine that contains the primers. This tube must be filled, like any magazine. Make sure you know when full is full, and don’t try to poke in one more. This is usually when “it” happens. Remember, primers are detonated via pressure. Said before, but important enough to say again now: Never (ever) attempt to more deeply seat a primer on a loaded round. And keep the priming cup (the tool part that holds the primer for seating) clear of all debris. I’ve heard tell of brass shavings, leftover tumbling media, and the like, getting between the primer and the tool cup, and forming its own little firing pin.

See what’s available at Midsouth HERE

The information in this article is from Glen’s newest book, Top-Grade Ammo, available HERE at Midsouth. Also check HERE for more information about this and other publications from Zediker Publishing.

Mad for Magpul

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Long before you’ll feel the excitement on the range of a 3-gun match you’ll need to pick your poison, and by that, I mean you’ll need to determine the guns you want to shoot. Continue reading Mad for Magpul